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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Friday on my Mind, 19 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Friday on My Mind: Scooter Boy - Mod Soul Boy - Pill Head Pt. 1 (Paperback)
If you are looking for an insightful book on modernists, this book isn't it. This is simply about suburban mainstream mods 'tickets' to anyone familiar with, or on the scene. One thing is for sure, nobody in this book can be called an 'original' in any way, shape or form.

Although the book contains some bad spelling and grammar you cannot fault the author for writing and publishing the book himself, his efforts should be applauded as he readily admits in the second book 'he is no writer'. It offers a fairly interesting look at society in the mid - late 60's but is mostly limited to events that occur in and around middlesex (Isleworth and Houslow) and offers nothing in relation to the original modernist scene.

Regardless of the above, the author did clearly have a zest and enthusiasm for the scene and this does come across although one has to note that so does the author's confusion to where he wants his life to go. The second book, 'pushin' and shovin' highlights this fact even further, Don Hughes seems to be intent on finding a group of people to belong to rather than stick to what he likes and has a passion for, individuality is as equally rewarding (if not more) than being part of the mainstream. After all, soul and R&B has always been around, in fact it has grown stronger.

The author's vulnerability does show with this weakness and his subsequent alcohol problem. One hopes the second book will help others who are experiencing the same issues to find a positive direction rather than slip into near oblivion.

Although there are better books regarding both eras that these two books cover, there are also worse.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 14 Feb 2012 15:46:59 GMT
Your quite correcr in your initial assesment that this isn't a book relating to those calling themselves 'modernists' I think Keith Richards amongst others covered that period slightly better in his book. The street mods of the early mid sixties onwards bore no relation to those arguing about the development of jazz styles of earlier years nor did they court comparison to the foppishness and puppet dancing of those described as mods in the tv and film portrayments of the time.

The street mods were all about music, clubbing, pill popping, scooters and sex with fashion thrown in on top. The bands had a naive but vibrant feel about them that encouraged each new dance and I don't think it was any different in West London to any other part of London. They were all poles apart from modernists who were forgotten almost until they returned as weekend hippies in the later part of the mid sixties.

If one had gone to these clubs at around the same time as Don most were unlicensed and catered mainly to 13 to 17 year olds and possibly one would have described them as teeny bops paradise. But as Don got older so the clubs of that time came to an end to be replaced by larger licensed venues catering more for records than bands and bringing an end to places where band and audience could intergrate.

It was a sort of coming of age period reflected again quite cleverly by Phil Daniels in Quadrophenia and felt by many others at the time.

Where do you go from here ?

Posted on 14 Feb 2012 15:50:01 GMT
Your quite correcr in your initial assesment that this isn't a book relating to those calling themselves 'modernists' I think Keith Richards amongst others covered that period slightly better in his book. The street mods of the early mid sixties onwards bore no relation to those arguing about the development of jazz styles of earlier years nor did they court comparison to the foppishness and puppet dancing of those described as mods in the tv and film portrayments of the time.

The street mods were all about music, clubbing, pill popping, scooters and sex with fashion thrown in on top. The bands had a naive but vibrant feel about them that encouraged each new dance and I don't think it was any different in West London to any other part of London. They were all poles apart from modernists who were forgotten almost until they returned as weekend hippies in the later part of the mid sixties.

If one had gone to these clubs at around the same time as Don most were unlicensed and catered mainly to 13 to 17 year olds and possibly one would have described them as teeny bops paradise. But as Don got older so the clubs of that time came to an end to be replaced by larger licensed venues catering more for records than bands and bringing an end to places where band and audience could intergrate.

It was a sort of coming of age period reflected again quite cleverly by Phil Daniels in Quadrophenia and felt by many others at the time.

Where do you go from here ?
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