Customer Review

144 of 158 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Broken Britain gone mad!, 3 April 2010
This review is from: Littlejohn's House of Fun: Thirteen Years of (Labour) Madness (Hardcover)
I've been following the media satirist Richard Littlejohn for many years and greatly enjoyed this latest collection of essays, recipes, poems and drawings. Littlejohn plays the character of an ultra-opinionated tabloid journalist who outrageously distorts the facts of his articles in order to match his various catchphrases, many of which are based around clever puns and worldplay.

I'd recommend this book to anyone finds Jeremy Clarkson's output a little too literate and left-wing.
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Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 3 Apr 2010 18:04:03 BDT
Last edited by the author on 3 Apr 2010 18:23:28 BDT
S. E. Blake says:
"Littlejohn plays the character of a (sic) ultra-opinionated tabloid journalist" ? Don't be a fool, he IS that character.
A bully-boy and a coward whose closest exposure to humiliation was narrowly avoided when David Dimbleby missed posing an embarrassing quote from the Daily Mail about Joanna Lumley which would have skewered him, this author was seen sweating and squirming on last week's edition of the BBC ' 'Question Time.'
Some indication of this book's collapse in value is apparent through its 50% price depreciation within a week of publication; a publication celebrated with a recent D. Mail literary lunch sponsored by Tesco - no doubt with battery hens clucking their approval at being torn apart by the Bard himself.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Apr 2010 01:18:50 BDT
I also watched the Question Time with Littlejohn and didn't once get the impression he was sweating or squirming. He seemed factually well-informed and placed his punches deftly and was frequently applauded by the audience. He was certainly better value than the dullards sitting next to him. These early Amazon reviews of Littlejohn's book are quite intriguing in that all of them award him 5 stars and then display a uniform snideness and visceral hatred of his work - any significance in that they cluster around April 1 or do we have a concerted conspiracy campaign at work here? I haven't read this book, neither I suspect have these reviewers who are gloating over its "collapse in value", but I've read a few excerpts online and the main thrust of his satire seems to me to be our national loss of common sense. Littlejohn clearly touches quite a few raw nerves on the liberal-left and their reaction suggests that he inspires more than a whiff of fear.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Apr 2010 16:07:52 BDT
G. J. Marsh says:
My remarks were obviously meant to be tounge-in-cheek but hint at a deeper truth. Gaunt, Glenn Beck, Littlejohn et al are paid to be opinionated, and are in huge demand for their "telling it like it is" brand of media work. So I've often wondered to what extent these types of commentators actually agree with their public announcements, considering they so often produce such poorly researched, inflammatory garbage.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Apr 2010 00:22:42 BDT
Tigger says:
You could draw a parallel with Toby Young who now says he used to get so drunk while editor of The Sun he used to make up editorials he didn't believe in and then not even recognise them the next morning.

He now claims he was a wet liberal Guardian reader type all along. Hence all the drinking, perhaps. I have no sympathy with him at all. Whatever you believe, you should be honest and not earn a large salary writing stuff you wouldn't agree with in a million years.

I do get the felling that Littlejohn is probably the genuine article: snide, vicious, sexist, violently traditional, anti-intellectual, selfish, money grabbing, loutish and probably racist as well.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Apr 2010 17:13:26 BDT
Guy - They clearly haven't read the book. Why buy a book written by someone you hate? It's clear why they are posting this stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Apr 2010 17:26:13 BDT
Littlejohn is clearly Britain's finest columnist. In 2005 he was inducted into the press media inaugural Hall of Fame as one of the giants over the past 40 years. As Matthew Parris (The Times) said quite some time ago, "....I admire Littlejohn, love his writing and am amazed that 1990s Britain has only produced one such satirist."

Nothing has changed since.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Apr 2010 16:56:25 BDT
"Littlejohn is clearly Britain's finest columnist."

A comic statement up there with 'the metallurgist Uri Geller'.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Apr 2010 18:02:18 BDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 1 May 2010 14:13:57 BDT
Last edited by the author on 1 May 2010 23:07:45 BDT
Nor is it a coincidence how folk keep pointing out that if our beloved, Florida-dwelling English patriot had a brain cell, it would surely die of abject loneliness. Nor, say, that his 'services' consist of a flop show on Sky News (secured for him by fellow scumbag Kelvin Mackenzie), a novel that tanked badly, and a few reprints of yellow journalism - for a newspaper that praised Hitler - that end their days on the shelves of remainder shops.

Try and stop twitching that curtain.

Posted on 12 Jul 2012 05:21:49 BDT
Nonny says:
"Media satirist"...now that is satire.
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