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Customer Review

42 of 53 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars part good part bad, 23 April 2008
This review is from: Shoot the Damn Dog: A Memoir of Depression (Hardcover)
Sally is a victim of her families own wealth which causes part of her depression and then the wealth she has helps her recover from depression and alcoholism. I am a normal working mother I cannot afford to take 3 years off work to recover. I certainly couldn't afford a landscape gardener, ever. £4000 for rehab??? acupunture weekly? I can barely afford it 6 weekly.
sick time? 2 weeks off then back to the rat race. who out there has 20,000 pounds in the bank doing nothing? I barely have 200. My mum in law is on benefits for the rest of her life 100 quid a week.
I don't envy her time at boarding school give me my mainstream education any day.
I'm not saying the book is bad but did she really need to talk about the money aspect of things? I will write a book on battling depression from the working class point of view and see if the differences can be spotted.....
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Showing 1-10 of 11 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 22 Jul 2009 16:48:16 BDT
J. Wilson says:
I totally agree with this point. I've never suffered from depression (but have several friends who claim to) - I certainly couldn't afford to "suffer" in the say this woman did. I want to read about it from the perspective of someone without a cushion so soft!!

Posted on 21 Oct 2009 11:16:42 BDT
J. Evans says:
I totally, totally agree with this point too. Sally Brampton should try suffering from 'severe clinical depression' (she enjoyed repeating that phrase eh?) in the NHS. Therapy groups, accupuncture? You are lucky to see a psychiatrist once a week in an NHS hospital and every couple of months as an outpatient. There was something rather self-indulgent about this book that spoilt it for me.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Aug 2010 22:35:20 BDT
Graeme says:
Well that comment merely demonstrates that you don't understand the concept that depression is a serious illness, and not an indulgence. It matters not what your financial status is. You wouldn't say "I couldn't afford to "suffer" from cancer".

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jun 2011 15:51:06 BDT
Eulipia says:
It's a pity that the author didn't grasp that it didn't matter what financial status one has and looked at her depression - as well as treatments - that didn't depend so much on having so large a disposable income.

Posted on 21 Jun 2011 15:52:10 BDT
Eulipia says:
"I will write a book on battling depression from the working class point of view and see if the differences can be spotted..... "

I wish that you would write such a book.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Jul 2011 17:27:18 BDT
Chris says:
Phew! That was a narrow escape! I very nearly brought this book, but now I can see I just could not relate to it! It is true, The Black Dog is no respecter of wealth, itelligence or age. However, to read a book from someone so privileged might just turn my Black Dog into a snarling nasty animal and it doesn't need much encouragement! How many of us (especially now sick benefit has been 'redefined?) are struggling to feed our families, much less pay for expensive therapies and how many small agencies which offered real support have been shut down due to funding problems. I would love to see a book on 'battling depression from the working class point of view and see if the differences can be spotted..... ', that is something I would part with my meagre, hard earned wages to buy. Anita, if you have it within you, go for it! If you don't, maybe someone else should take up your mantle. The challenge is out there!

Posted on 30 Aug 2011 00:22:36 BDT
M. E. Powell says:
I don't think that you have any idea of what this book is about. This is not a book detailing the different monetary elements of recovery from depression, nor is it a how to guide to recovery. It is a memoir, accurately depicting the struggle which Sally went through in order to get better. Perhaps you cannot afford the particular process which she used, perhaps you can't go to private doctors. What you can do is examine the more personal, less monetary elements of her struggle and take advice from someone who has suffered and largely recovered.
Moreover, please do not make any references to her families own wealth, or to her family at all. Her families wealth had nothing to do with her recovery at all, mainly because her family did not have any. The money she had at the time of her recovery was her own and her husband's, whch they jointly worked to create. Do not attack somebody just because they speak from a different perspective from you. Attempt to understand their viewpoint without jumping to conclusions or assuming they cannot help.

Posted on 20 Apr 2012 17:13:52 BDT
Catherine says:
Loved your review! Not read the book yet, but your review was so honest. Thanks!

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Dec 2013 14:04:33 GMT
A succinct reply and absolutely correct, all I'm hearing from others are their envy and jealousy over someone's wealth depicting a common view that people with money cannot possibly know what depression or hardship is. This was her journey, she cannot help the family that she was born into as nor can any of us. As you say, her and her husband's money was worked for and used, good I'm glad, I hate to think of anyone suffering this debilitating illness of which I have suffered for years and I had no money, I got through it myself, but I would not sit here and denigrate her story simply because I didn't have money and she did. I am interested in her journey and what it meant for her, but I would like to hear about those of us who make without a cushion as well, maybe I will write my own one day. If we are still here after what we have gone through then we should consider ourselves fortunate, many do not make it and that is a sad reality, therefore it's not about money.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Dec 2013 14:15:33 GMT
So you would wish severe clinical depression on this woman because she happened to have a safety net and you talk about it as if you can choose to go out and try it like you would a new brand of drink or a new item of clothing. I find your comment very envious and cruel, you didn't like her viewpoint and that's okay, but no need to attack her and wish upon her something so dreadful because perhaps that would make you feel better.
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