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Customer Review

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfection almost within reach, 8 Jan 2012
This review is from: Works By Ravel, Debussy & Massenet (Audio CD)
It seems difficult to find a masterpiece that gets as many disappointing performances as the Ravel G Major Concerto. The first two movements pose serious interpretative problems. In the first movements, these have to do with the tempo relations between the Allegramente main theme and the Meno vivo secondary sections. Meno vivo certainly means slower than the basic tempo, but how much so? Many pianists cannot resist the temptation to slam on the breaks and prepare for a show of hyper-sensitive pianism, thereby destroying both the continuity and the dry humour of the piece. In the Adagio, there is basically just one tempo, and it is certainly quite slow (`Assez lent') but not extremely so, - the piece should not sound unduly solemn or pathetic. Ravel's models here were Mozart and Saint-SaŽns, not Bruckner or Tchaikovsky.
Marguerite Long's 1932 recording with the composer conducting clearly demonstrates how these pieces should be done, but that recording really sounds its age. From the stereo era, there used to be three really good recordings: the volatile, exuberant FranÁois with Cluytens (EMI), the incomparable Monique Haas with Paul Paray (DG) and as an outsider, the intensely poetic Moravec (Supraphone), endearingly accompanied by the characterful but not wholly idiomatic Prague Philharmonia under Belohlavek.
Bavouzet now joins this trio; to my ears, he finishes in second place just behind Haas. In the booklet notes, Bavouzet writes that he and Tortelier were both pupils of the great Ravelian Pierre Sancan, and they certainly know how to pace the music - in both movements, they are just seconds slower than Long or Haas. I do have some reservations, however, concerning the orchestral playing. It is no secret that the BBC Philharmonic does not have the most powerful bass section in the world (no complaints about the really prominent side drum, though!). More disconcertingly, the playing in general, while technically very accomplished, sounds just a shade plain and anonymous at times. The cor anglais solo from the Adagio provides a good case in point: the British player is certainly technically better than his French colleague from 1965 on the Haas recording, but sounds a bit detached while the quavering, reedy French cor anglais breaks your heart. Roughly similar observations apply to the reading of the Concerto for the Left Hand, and if that means that these recordings are not quite perfect, these reservations do not seem serious enough to withhold a fifth star, especially since Bavouzet turns out to be one of the very few pianists who can really make you love Debussy's atmospheric but rhapsodic Fantaisie. The Massenet encores are lightweight but delightfully done. All in all, this is clearly the best modern recording of the Ravel Concertos, and can be confidently recommended - but true perfection remains elusive in these works.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 8 Jan 2012 14:20:05 GMT
One small caveat to your interesting review: it may or may not be "no secret" that the BBC Philharmonic "does not have the most powerful bass section in the world" but as the orchestra here is the superb BBC Symphony Orchestra and not its Manchester-based sibling, I'm not sure of the relevance of that remark. As far as the playing style goes, I agree that it's easy to get dewy-eyed about the spiritually superior frailties of those fine recordings from half a century ago upon which many of us were brought up. Personally, though, I much prefer the appropriately Mozartean detachment of the BBC SO's Cor Anglais to the soulful quacking of the French player with Haas - but chacun a son gout! Not sure either that the Massenet pieces are so lightweight as all that: they contain the seeds of Ravel's aesthetic rather neatly, and for me enhanced the value of the CD very much.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Mar 2013 23:18:02 GMT
And/Burro says:
I haven't heard that the BBC Symphony Orchestra "doesn't have the most powerful bass section in the world." But I would say they do have a fine bass section as they are a world class Orcgestra.
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