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5.0 out of 5 stars I discovered that I knew the textbooks produced in the country, but not the country., 14 Nov 2013
This review is from: The Murder of History: A Critique of History Textbooks Used in Pakistan (Hardcover)
No small wonder that K K Aziz died in abject penury. Living in Pakistan the courageous scholar had the audacity to claim that Pakistan was created by the Hindus under the persistent nagging of the Muslims of India for greater rights. It was Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel's declaration that India would rather live in peace without the permanent headache of the Muslim problem, which convinced the Hindus acquince to Partition. Jinnah had already, in May 1946 accepted the Cabinet Mission Plan thereby abandoning the Pakistani ideal.

Was there any significant effort by the Muslim masses for their freedom from their British masters? Yes there was by parties like Khudai Khidmatgars and Khaksars but both also were not in favour of an independent Muslim country. There were no other parties fighting to throw off the English yoke of slavery in the freedom struggle. Pakistani nationality therefore was born after 1947, and thrived as there was almost no other contesting opinion to the tailored Islamic image created by the salaried apologists. Some of the claims are clearly contradictory, and are very effectively demonstrated by the author.

The only question that troubles me is, that did the forefathers have any other choice? Especially if we accept the authors narrative that independence was thrusted upon us? Surly we had to survive, and in order to survive we created this magnificent identity myth. All identities are selective reading of history in my opinion, so we little choice in that matter. The real mistake was sanctifying this created identity as this creates fundamentalism and self delusion on a national level, which once it sets in, is pretty difficult to destroy, as the author found out for himself when he published his groundbreaking study.

`I discovered that I knew the textbooks produced in the country, but not the country.'

The book is a seminal study clearly explaining the mindset of the Pakistani nation, explaining most of its contradictions, presenting many intriguing areas of research and unanswered questions for any prospective historian.

Like

How did a martial Muslim race not fight for independence choosing instead to remain loyal to their new masters the British?
Broken relationship between Jinnah and Liaquat Ali Khan.
Failure to produce a new constitution even after 4 years of power by Liaquat Ali Khan.
The complete destruction of Punjabi culture and identify.

The Partition of India can be understood by the Pakistani attitude of the secession of East Pakistan when they claim that Bangladesh was never meant to remain united from the beginning. Surely now the Hindu logic when granting Muslims their own land can now be understood?

The author makes a pretty significant statement about lying in the textbooks. He makes a direct correlation with the Pakistani profile and the persistent inconsistent textbooks that produced it. The assertion is pretty relevant in my opinion, as it does explain the self righteousness, hostile, self praise and self glorification as general attributes of a Pakistani. How much damage these books full of lies has done is an open debate but it has to be pretty significant.

A very pertinent observation is also made about Punjabis taking over the Pakistani ideology mantra, which supposedly was a UP based movement. The result was the decimation of Punjabi language as a result of this enthusiastic imposition of Urdu in Punjab.

The authors makes an astute observation when analysing lack of protests against this inaccurately taught history by the people. Protests originate from the need, ability. And need emerges from want and awareness. If most people are not aware than how will they protest?

The book is simply brilliant!!!!
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