Customer Review

642 of 703 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent tense thriller with a conscience, 14 Aug 2008
This review is from: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Book 1) (Paperback)
Some incredible thrillers are coming from Scandinavian countries these days. Anyone who is a fan of the Kurt Wallander series of books by Henning Mankell will know what I mean. Now we have a new addition to the shelf, courtesy of deceased author, Stieg Larsson.

This is the first volume in the Millenium trilogy and after finishing this first book, I am very much looking forward to the next two volumes. Larssson died in 2004 soon after delivering the manuscripts for 3 crime novels to his publisher. It's a pity that this gifted author isn't around for a long time to come.

The tale is split between the shady secrets of a wealthy family and the murky dealings of a famous businessman. Mikael Blomkvist, a recently convicted journalist, is hired by Henrik Vanger to investigate the disappearance of his niece almost 40 years ago. Vanger promises Blomkvist the means to clear his good name as part of the payment and Blomkvist accepts.

The author manages to maintain an excellent pace throughout, but still delivers a strong social lesson while providing the thrills. It is an intelligent thriller with a conscience. Probably one of the best of its kind in recent years.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 29 Mar 2009 17:24:24 BDT
i AGREE!

Posted on 1 Sep 2009 15:52:50 BDT
Miffy says:
loved it, am now ordering part 2

Posted on 6 Sep 2009 16:13:33 BDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 6 Jan 2010 18:24:01 GMT
C. G. Horner says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 14 Jan 2010 16:57:53 GMT
Apple-eater says:
It certainly had a political message. Much of what Larsson writes about the Swedish business class rings true; just look at the decline of Saab, Volvo, and other once-great Swedish companies, and the country really doesn't look as prosperous and self-assured as it used to. And all this happened as an admiring, uncritical, business press looked on. Just like the credit crunch here, I suppose.

But I'm not so sure it's what you'd call a conscience, I'd say it was, rather, a venting of his political views, views which many might find offensive. For example, his views on men are pure 1980s dungaree feminist.

The way everyone bad is from the right, and only the right is bad, is a bit grating. His take on the Winter War, for example - he mentions Swedish nazis going to fight for Finland, which kind of overlooks the fact that Finland was fighting for its life, having been invaded by the USSR.

And after 9/11, 7/7, the Danish cartoon riots, the Madrid bombs etc, it's hard to see the far right as the major threat to security, democracy and freedom. So no, it's not conscience that Larsson is showing.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Apr 2010 09:50:52 BDT
Warren Evans says:
Well that entirely depends on your own world view. There are those that would argue that much of the of the far right hegemony has been subsumed by the right in power. Immigration controls are punitive where we imprison refugee's; capitialism has been accepted as the only economic model (even by by Maoist China); imperialism is alive and kicking throughtout the globe (which then give's rise to religious extremism in response). So, politics or conscience? I would argue that politics IS conscience, but then I'm a political 'dinosaur'. "...it's hard to see the far right as the major threat to security, democracy and freedom" is entirely on your perspective...

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Apr 2010 20:33:12 BDT
Jase W says:
All the author delivered was novel about 200 pages too long filled with tedious sections about making sandwiches and coffee, an advert for Apple products, a hypocritical view on women and a pathetic heroine who is a middle aged bloke's idea of what a rebel is.

I cringed every time he mentioned the slogans on Salander's t-shirts. Such a corny cliche of a character.

Posted on 19 Jun 2010 04:06:39 BDT
Moonlit says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2010 22:53:58 BDT
brain cell says:
Jase Wildheart -

Why "a hypocritical view on women"? Why "a pathetic heroine"? I think you would generate a bit more respect for your views if you actually bothered to substantiate these remarks with some kind of coherent argument. That's if you're up to it, of course.

And no, 200 pages were not filled with tedious sections about making sandwiches and coffee. Try reading the book and you might find that out for yourself.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jul 2010 22:56:27 BDT
brain cell says:
Moonlit -

No, I don't feel like "trusting you". What I see is gatecrashing to advertise another book. Pretty unethical, in my opinion.
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.2 out of 5 stars (1,864 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (1,062)
4 star:
 (398)
3 star:
 (179)
2 star:
 (93)
1 star:
 (132)
 
 
 
7.99 3.85
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: Ireland

Top Reviewer Ranking: 6,191