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Customer Review

32 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great value up front and low running cost, 5 Oct. 2011
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This review is from: TP-LINK TL-SG1005D 5-Port Gigabit Unmanaged Desktop Switch (Personal Computers)
I have been very impressed with this unit - compact and unobtrusive it has handled my setup at home with no problems

Bedroom 2: ADSL Modem Router (100MB) -> TP Link Powerline Adapter (200MB) ->
Living Room: TP Link Powerline Adapter (200MB) -> this Switch (1000MB) -> Xbox360, Internet-enabled LCD TV, iMac

What I am most impressed with is that even though my current setup is not all gigabit I have already got a small but definitely noticeable uptick in browsing speed on my iMac (nothing else at all has changed in my setup including browser version (Chrome v14) - I supposed I would see that with any gigabit switch but at this price it's great value.

Also, one final point, the documentation states its lower power green credentials - this switch powers off the ports when not in use and adjusts the power used depending on the length of Ethernet cable in use with each port
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Comments

Tracked by 3 customers

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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 4 May 2012 15:29:09 BDT
RB says:
With regard to...

"Bedroom 2: ADSL Modem Router (100MB) -> TP Link Powerline Adapter (200MB) ->
Living Room: TP Link Powerline Adapter (200MB) -> this Switch (1000MB) -> Xbox360, Internet-enabled LCD TV, iMac"

Hi - is this setup working fine? I just called TP Link and the guy told me that connecting the switch to a powerline adapter would not work - it needs to be connected directly to the router. So I asked...does that mean I need to buy more powerline adapters as having the switch upstairs where the router is will be of no use to me...and after laughing...he said yes.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 May 2012 09:47:44 BDT
Last edited by the author on 7 May 2012 09:48:19 BDT
Ammo says:
Hi, it's working fine, the switch has crashed a couple of times, around once per month, easily rectified by rebooting it.
I'm not sure what you told the support person at TP link, if you're saying your internet connection is upstairs and you need to share this downstairs then two powerline adapters and a switch downstairs should be fine (ie same as mine; should work) - just to clarify this switch won't help on it's own for your setup, you'll need at least a pair of powerline adapters - can you clarify your proposed setup?

In reply to an earlier post on 7 May 2012 11:25:06 BDT
RB says:
Thanks for your reply.

I basically asked the guy at TP if I can set it up the way you had done.

My proposed set up was this...

One powerline adapter connected directly to my router upstairs.

The other powerline adapter would be downstairs in the conservatory. The switch would be connected to this. I would then connect a DVR and NAS to the switch.

As you can see, it's pretty similar to what you have.

The TP Link person told me that this would not work as you have to connect the switch directly to the router.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 May 2012 10:18:51 BDT
Ammo says:
Hi, that's pretty much my setup, good luck!

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jul 2012 09:51:48 BDT
Canuck's Fan says:
Hi,

Did you try it and did it work ?

I ask as it's a similar plan to mine....

Cheers.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jul 2012 11:14:42 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Jul 2012 11:15:20 BDT
RB says:
Hi,

I've actually scrapped the plan since I'm having a conservatory built and I decided to hardwire the Ethernet cables by putting in another wireless router in there. So my end plan is...

Main wireless router (upstairs) connects to second wireless router (downstairs) by Ethernet cable.

TP-Link 5-Port Gigabit Unmanaged Desktop Switch (which I've now bought) connects to the downstairs' wireless router.

I didn't scrap the initial plan because I thought the TP Link Powerline Adapter option would not work - as Ammo's post say that it does. My belief is that the TP Link advisor that I spoke to gave me an answer based on TP Link's recommended guidelines. However, I saved myself around £150 in not buying the adapters (I planned to buy a few) because I was able to use Ethernet cables instead (and was prepared to spend a few hours drilling holes and connecting everything up myself).

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 13:35:16 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Jul 2012 13:39:04 BDT
To answer this point:

The Ethernet-over-power (EoP) options are essentially a network switch where the box itself are your mains circuits. Plugging a switch into one of the EoP plugs with an Ethernet cable is exactly the same thing as daisy-chaining two regular Ethernet switches together with an Ethernet cable - i.e. (in theory) you can do this a limitless number of times.

EoP operates on the data-link layer of the network, so all they do is redirect network traffic.

What you will still need a router for is its DHCP server capabilities (or else, a component in your network capable of administering DHCP, for example some NAS servers can do this). You need something to assign and maintain IP addresses. In this sense, EoP can't replace a typical home network - instead it just augments it.

I hope this makes sense. (I also hope you successfully set all this up!)

As an example, in my house:

MODEM ---- ROUTER (DHCP)

Into the router are plugged: (1) EoP plug, (2) Ethernet switch A, (3) Ethernet switch B, (4) NAS Server

So (1) connects all other EoP devices (wifi, computer, media streamer) to my main router, and basically my mains behaves in exactly the same way that the two other Ethernet switches behave.

It also means that two devices connected through (1) have to share 100mbps when connecting to anything else in the network, e.g. NAS or stuff behind Switch A or Switch B. This is the limitation of daisy chaining switches.

Hope this helped explain it. (Hope you were originally successful!)
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