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Customer Review

19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and Informative, 31 Aug. 2007
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This review is from: The Argentine Fight For The Falklands (Paperback)
As an avid student of the Falklands War, having served there twice and having a great affinity for the Islands and people, I felt it essential to see the other side of the conflict just to see how the Argentines had squandered such a militarily strong position on the islands. Some of the accounts did not surprise me and it became clear throughout the book the massive gulf that exists between the Officer corps and the conscripted bulk of the Argentine armed forces. It amazed me that the Argentines ever thought that they could stand against the finest armed forces in the world. Middlebrook has researched the subject well although without the cooperation of the Argentine Air Force, whose accounts are derived from an Argentine publication. The anecdote that brought home to me that the Argentinian foray into British sovereign territory was doomed was an account from an officer on Mount Kent who waved off his platoon as they were sent to reenforce failure at Goose Green, his main concern being that he got into dry clothes and had a good bottle of red wine before bemoaning the loss of his men - one cannot imagine the most lacklustre British officer ever contemplating doing that. No wonder the will to win was not there.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 2 Jan 2014 09:35:30 GMT
Last edited by the author on 2 Jan 2014 09:37:37 GMT
P. Grane says:
A reviewer should keep to reviewing the book, as objectively as he possibly can. This reviewer, self-admittedly, was involved in the conflict for one side (the British) and apparently cannot rise above that. This is evident from his reference to "the Argentinian foray into British sovereign territory ..." The book's abstract says that it does not go into issues of sovereignty, yet the reviewer quite conclusively asserts that the Malvinas/Falklands were under the UK's sovereignty. Not so, according to many (though not all) historians and scholars of Public International Law. As for the reviewer's comment that the UK had "the finest armed forces in the world", I suggest that he read any of the books by Max Hastings (a British historian) on the II World War and decide if he wishes to revisit that statement.
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