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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Regency Romance
The heroine is Deborah Grantham, she helps run her aunt's gaming house - her aunt is respectable but short of money as she has had to look after Deborah and her brother. Deborah has two men interested in her the Earl of Ormskirk who wants a mistress and Lord Mablethorpe (Adrian) who offers marriage.
The Hero is Max Ravenscar, who is enlisted by his aunt (Lord...
Published on 19 Sept. 2004 by april-showers

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hammy reading
I was so happy to see this title amongst the recent Naxos audiobook recordings of Georgette Heyer's books, as I haven't seen another reading of it anywhere. However, the narrator was badly cast. Her reading is slow-paced with strange silences as she appears to be trying to alter her voice for her characters and her intonation is hammy and irritating. It feels quite...
Published 15 months ago by Stonehaven


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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Regency Romance, 19 Sept. 2004
This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
The heroine is Deborah Grantham, she helps run her aunt's gaming house - her aunt is respectable but short of money as she has had to look after Deborah and her brother. Deborah has two men interested in her the Earl of Ormskirk who wants a mistress and Lord Mablethorpe (Adrian) who offers marriage.
The Hero is Max Ravenscar, who is enlisted by his aunt (Lord Mablethorpe's mother) to help her pay Deborah to leave Adrian alone.
The only problem is Deborah insulted refuses to be bought off and a battle ensues between her and Max, complicated by carriage races, wagers kidnappings, distressed young girls, friends younger brothers and the evil Sir James Filey.
The writing is so beautifully and distinctively G Heyer (written in 1941 there are no 'intimate' scenes - but you never miss them) and like all her books I loved it, although it is not one of my personal favourites it will be read many times.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very funny, lively, brilliant., 26 Feb. 2010
This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
Max Ravenscar is incredulous when he hears that his young cousin intends to marry a common gaming-house wench. But when he meets the attractive and elegant Miss Grantham in said gaming house, and is strongly attracted to her himself, he finally realises what he is up against. With his hapless cousin behaving like a mooncalf in her presence, he is determined to stop it whatever it takes. Deb is outraged at his insolent manner, and there ensues a battle of wills between them, with both prepared to go to any lengths to get their own way. An enjoyable and very funny story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Engaging Battle of Wits In Regency Times, 29 Nov. 2010
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This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
Horrified by the prospect that her misguided young son may be about to make a mesalliance with a woman from a gaming house, Lady Mablethorpe engages the aid of her nephew Max to rescue her poor Adrian from this lady's clutches.

And so begins a battle of wills between the Midas-rich, cynical and clever Max Ravenscar and the delectable, proud and just as witty Deborah Grantham, forced to assist her aunt, Lady Bellingham, at the gaming tables of her 'select' establishment in London's St James's Square. Revolted and fascinated in equal measures with each other, they will spar their way to a tempestuous love whilst Max tries to free the sweet but hapless Adrian from his infatuation of Deb, and she tries just as fiercely to thwart him at every turn, to teach him a lesson.

Backed up by such characters as the twittering plumed-hatted Lady Bellingham, the devilish Lucius Kennet, ex-pugilist Wantage, nefarious Lord Ormskirk, the helplessly innocent Miss Laxton and Max's minx half-sister Arabella, this story sparkles from beginning to very end.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hammy reading, 4 Dec. 2013
I was so happy to see this title amongst the recent Naxos audiobook recordings of Georgette Heyer's books, as I haven't seen another reading of it anywhere. However, the narrator was badly cast. Her reading is slow-paced with strange silences as she appears to be trying to alter her voice for her characters and her intonation is hammy and irritating. It feels quite amateurish, which I'm sure Naxos wasn't intending, having commissioned excellent readings by Richard Armitage and Clare Wille. (The recent unabridged version of Sylvester by Nicholas Rowe, while far more professionally delivered, also lacks sparkle and wit and sympathy with the story and characters - he sounds bored and I found myself constantly drifting off, despite being riveted by a previous unabridged recording, now forced out of print by the new version). I'm not sure I'll be able to listen to the full recording of Faro's Daughter as the clumsy reading is fast putting me off what was a previous favourite. What a pity Naxos didn't find readers more in tune with Heyer's light but immensely fun novels for these two readings.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars very good Heyer with a unique setting and heroine, 13 April 2008
This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book. The only downside to it is the slightly odd note the heroine strikes-- she is honorable and intelligent, yet does something very silly. That bit of the book seemed like it was lifted from a story about a different heroine.

Overall, a fun romp with a heroine who has a sense of honor, and a hero who makes a great mistake in his evaluation of her. Interesting because the setting and situations are very different than other Heyer books. A satisfying ending.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a Favourite, but still wonderful, 22 Nov. 2007
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Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
Here, Heyer takes on the notions of what it is to be 'respectable' in terms of the Regency Period. The heroine helps run a gaming den, hence the title, Faro's Daughter (Faro is a kind of card game). She becomes emotionally entangled with a young aristocrat who has formed an attachment to her and wishes to marry her. Naturally his family don't approve. It is all very well for a young man to waste his money on cards and loose women, but it is not very well for him to then marry into such a world.
The hero, Max, is sent to rescue his addle pated relation from such a terrible fate, and naturally becomes entangled with the young femme fatale herself, with all kinds of disastrous consequences, which naturally in Heyer's world, all work themselves out neatly before the end of the book!
What I found difficult about this book was the fact that I couldn't really warm to the heroine, Deborah, too easily. It seemed she was more a vehicle than a character in her own right. She never really fleshed out well, as so many of Heyer's other characters do.
Despite this it was still a delightful read and one of the most productive ways I've found to spend a wet Saturday afternoon. You won't be disappointed.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars poor reading, 25 Mar. 2013
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this is read with apparent lack of understanding. one character is Irish but this is ignored making a near nonsence of what he's saying. very disappointing compared to previous recordings in this series.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unusual Heyer and very funny, 21 Jun. 2008
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Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
The heroine Deb Grantham makes this an unusual story as she's working in her aunt's gaming house, though to be fair she's as upper-class as all Heyer's heroines. The hero Max Ravenscar is untitled and while very rich is uninterested in women and prefers horse-racing and gambling. All the same, he is completely offended when his cousin Lord Mablethorpe intends to marry Deb as soon as he is of age and takes it upon himself to buy her off...

For once the tension between hero and heroine has a genuine cause and Max is very ungentlemanly with Deb at the beginning which leads her to plot his downfall which she does with a charming combination of ruthlessness and care. The central scene in the cellar is wonderful (I don't want to give anything away) and very funny, and workings out of the tangled plot both playful and amusing. Deb's aunt adds some light relief and the interventions of an Irish gambler friend and a pugilist add to the slightly unorthodox setting. However the ending is as charmingly predictable as ever. I tend to prefer the masterful to the timid heroes in Heyer's books and so this is one of my favourites.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love in a gaming house, 13 Mar. 2011
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Damaskcat (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Kindle Edition)
Deborah Grantham assists her aunt - Lady Bellingham - in running a gaming house. She has caught the eye of young Lord Mablethorpe who has shocked his family by saying he wants to marry Deborah when he comes of age in a few months time. Mablethorpe's cousin, the wealthy Max Ravenscar, vows to buy Deborah off. But things do not go to plan and Max finds in Deb a foe worthy of his steel.

This is a boisterous comedy of misunderstandings and manners. It is probably one of Georgette Heyer's more light hearted novels with its fast paced plot and volatile characters. I loved Deborah and Max and Lady Bellingham is a marvellously comic character with her fixation on the cost of green peas and wax candles. I also liked Arabella - Max Ravenscar's half sister.

A marvellously enjoyable romp of a book with amusing dialogue which will make you laugh out loud in places. The goodies are not too good and the baddies are not too bad and the reader knows that things will work out well in the end. This is an ideal book to read when you need cheering up on a wet winter afternoon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Max Meets His Match in Deborah - Lovely Story, 13 Aug. 2014
This review is from: Faro's Daughter (Paperback)
Max Ravenscar is a renowned gambler, is considered a somewhat uncaring gentleman and makes no effort to impress eligible females. However, once he learns his young cousin, Adrian, is enthralled with a young woman who works in her aunt's gaming house, Max is determined to put an end to the romance and soon meets his match. Deborah Grantham does indeed work in a gaming house but she is a few years older than Adrian, is a woman of honor and has no intention of accepting Adrian's suit.

When the haughty, Max Ravenscar comes to the gaming house with the intent of taking Deborah down relative to her "assumed" intentions, and has the gall to offer her the inducement of 20,000 pounds to give Adrian up, Deborah is affronted and decides to turn the tables on Max. I. Loved. Deborah. She enlists the aid of a friend to kidnap Max and store him in the basement in order to make sure he can't perform in a race to which he has committed and upon which lots of money has been wagered. Things begin to go awry when Max and Deborah both begin to realize everything is not as they assumed. When Deborah's younger brother returns home and begins to involve himself with the "kidnapped" Max, further complications ensue.
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