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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bonkers!
These little books are a great idea and make lovely companions to the albums in question. Most readers will have the album already, particularly so for such a monumental classic as Led Zep iv. Thus I think this must have been one of the most difficult ones to write in the series. What else can one say that is not known already? The approach is therefore original as I...
Published on 4 Mar 2007 by jol legend

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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ugggghhhhhh!!!!!
Want to know what it was like during the recording sessions? What was the atmosphere like when Stairway to Heaven was being recorded? How did Sandy Deny get on with the group? What sort of guitar strings did Page use?
All these questions and hundreds more left totally unanswerd!
No, instead we have page after page of psudo-academic rubbish. For example, Erik is...
Published on 10 Mar 2006 by D. Brockis


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bonkers!, 4 Mar 2007
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These little books are a great idea and make lovely companions to the albums in question. Most readers will have the album already, particularly so for such a monumental classic as Led Zep iv. Thus I think this must have been one of the most difficult ones to write in the series. What else can one say that is not known already? The approach is therefore original as I think it has to be, and I think it succeeds.

What's in it? At 177 pages this is possibly the thickest book of the series. The detail is staggering; there's a bit on the imagery of the cover, the science of recording, an interesting section on the physical concept of an album (as opposed to the digital download), and alot on Aleister Crowley and satan, and the obligatory backward messages hidden in "Stairway to Heaven"; we don't even reach track 1 until page 75 and then the author even discusses the gaps in between the tracks! It concentrates very much on things magical, pagan, phallic, mythical, and (middle) earthy (even the spelling of "Erik" conjures up visions of black magic!). Therefore we learn quite a bit about Page and Plant, but not much on the other two. Alot of it is frankly bonkers, but who cares, it is thoroughly entertaining and I devoured it!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, 6 Oct 2005
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I quite fancied myself to write one of these little books on a favourite album. Then I read this. The depth and range of knowledge and insight that Erik Davies brings to bear on this album practically crushes the artifact itself. His sense of irony and humour is a constant joy and carries the reader skipping along. This is balanced, brilliant and highly enjoyable.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ugggghhhhhh!!!!!, 10 Mar 2006
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D. Brockis "dave6566" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Want to know what it was like during the recording sessions? What was the atmosphere like when Stairway to Heaven was being recorded? How did Sandy Deny get on with the group? What sort of guitar strings did Page use?
All these questions and hundreds more left totally unanswerd!
No, instead we have page after page of psudo-academic rubbish. For example, Erik is kind enough to point out that this album came out on vinyl, vinyl is analogue, analogy is key to magical practice, Jimmy Page is into magic. This is somehow significant enough to need half a dozen pages to explain and totaly ignores the equally remarcable coincidence that CDs are digital, digits are numbers, numerology is a key magical practice...
This is music writing at its worst: a music journalist who loves the sound of his own proes more than the music he's writing about. Avoid at all cost.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear......, 11 Oct 2006
Not much to say really apart from how utterly tedious this book was to read. I usually enjoy reading about how people are affected by great music but this was just nonsense and tells you nothing about how this great album came into being......a wasted opportunity.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books concerning rock music, 17 Mar 2007
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C. Lowe "Mr Lowe" (Bristol, UK) - See all my reviews
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Yes, this book has absolutely nothing about guitar strings.

Instead it is a subjective (i.e., magickal) view about the authors relationship to the record.

It captures with brilliance the fine line between the sublime and the ridiculous.

So doesn't that make it one of the best books about the ultimate rock group?
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