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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War at Sea a Hundred Years Ago
These wartime recollections of the Captain of the battleship HMS Canopus cover her initial commissioning from reserve, the battles of Coronel and Falklands in 1914, and Canopus’ service bombarding the Turks in the Dardanelles in 1915 and then in support of the land campaign, and against Smyrna, and contain much detail not otherwise published.

Mark Tanner...
Published 2 months ago by Seaweed

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
Informative but a bit of a dry read
Published 1 month ago by Kevin Abbott


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War at Sea a Hundred Years Ago, 11 Jun 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
These wartime recollections of the Captain of the battleship HMS Canopus cover her initial commissioning from reserve, the battles of Coronel and Falklands in 1914, and Canopus’ service bombarding the Turks in the Dardanelles in 1915 and then in support of the land campaign, and against Smyrna, and contain much detail not otherwise published.

Mark Tanner has worked the story up from a series of articles by Grant published in the Naval Review 1923-4. The style suggests that the original was worked up from Grant’s Reports of Proceedings but is illuminated by a gentle, dry humour which reflects the level of farce which has a tendency to bubble to the surface beneath all the RN’s operations, which helps to keep its personnel sane.

There are two threads in this narrative that one might single out. One is Grant’s continuing and thoughtful care for his men. The other is a clear awareness of how the entire Dardanelles event was being driven by Churchill (not named directly), bullying his admirals and generals along with no understanding of naval strategy or tactics nor of logistics, and initially as First Lord trying to win the game with the RN without proper accompanying military provision. The result was the doomed fiasco we all know about. One might also add a lingering smell of poor coordination and staff work in the higher reaches. The ambivalent Greeks and less than perfectly competent French, and the Italians who are both, also attract notice (but the French aviators in theatre receive unstinting praise).

Slow and plagued by defects, Canopus’ usefulness down South was limited, but she came into her own at the Dardanelles and the detailed account of her adventures there, including all sorts of recherché vignettes, makes fascinating reading, as do Grant’s sometimes quite acid comments on it all. Often under fire, and under mine and later submarine threat, it was sheer luck that Canopus avoided the fate of the other ships we lost there. Following the overdue but successful evacuation of the Dardanelles, Canopus was diverted to offensive operations against Smyrna, where she had been stationed part of the time already. In both locations Grant was senior naval officer and so in charge of many interesting (but otherwise unsung) adventures away from his ship, large numbers of whose company spent time ashore on various communications and other errands. The beginnings of the use of seaborne air power are noteworthy.

The main narrative is supported by an account by Canopus’ Executive Officer, Commander Stopford, also from the Naval Review, covering the ship’s career from commissioning up to Stopford’s relief in 1915. There is also an appendix relating to mark Tanner’s separately published letters of Philip Malet de Carteret, one of Canopus’ midshipmen, which includes a number of references for further reading.

Grant (1864-1938) ended his 43 years of service as Admiral Sir Heathcoat Grant KCMG, CB.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Top Man, 13 Aug 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Heathcoat Grant became a senior naval officer after WWI, indeed an Admiral. He was unlucky to get command of HMS Canopus, which was obsolete before war was even declared.

His account of command in both the Falklands and then the Dardanelles is dry and to the point. Our country is living through the 100 year commemoration of the outbreak of the war, and much of the simplistic celebration of sacrifice it entails is put into context by this short account.

No complaints other than bad luck in not being able to steam fast enough to engage the enemy. His wife visits him in Malta when he was sick. She crossed the Mediterranean twice, at risk from enemy submarines, and must have made her way across France as well. He expresses himself as being relieved that she made it safely home. Canopus shells the enemy over the top of trenches containing his brother, he notes the death of a friends son. He just carried on, like thousands of others, doing his duty. The ship constantly breaks down, he has a crew with little experience. He keeps going. He is clearly pleased with every responsibility given to him, but expresses himself without pride. He celebrates his keen young officers.

What would he make of the current lachrymose nonsense I think I know. It's free, and it is worth a read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading, 22 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Well worth reading. I had previously read 'Castles of Steel' by Robert Massie which includes very interesting accounts of the various roles of the WW1 battleship Canopus. This was the ship captained by the author of 'My War at Sea' - Heathcote S Grant - who describes the ship as 'almost obsolete'. These two books complement each other very well, albeit from very different perspectives.

An obsolete battleship certainly: but Grant's very readable account shows him as always very busy. Grant comes across to me as sensible and practical. Perhaps with another command he would have had a higher profile, but he was nevertheless very well respected. He was quite forward looking too: for example he gives interesting accounts of the use of aircraft, mainly valued for photographic surveys of enemy positions.

Grant has reservations about war planning, particularly for the Dardanelles, but dutifully does his job. I grew to respect the man and his work.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wothy commander, 11 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Very informative and readable. It made me realise how inept and unprofessional the higher command was in the first word war. No supplies even water in the heat of Turkey, and the appalling and needless loss of life this entailed. It seems that the captain was a rare competent in that campaign.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Old and creaking she might have been but she managed to be present at so many great events - the battles of Coronel (on edges) a, 16 Aug 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
This splendid book gives a unique insight into the operation of a large, though obsolete, warship in teh first two years of WW1. Old and creaking she might have been but she managed to be present at so many great events - the battles of Coronel (on edges) and of the Falklands (opening shots) and grueling and deadly service off the Gallipoli beaches. The account of service of Smyrna is particularly interesting - I have never seen it covered elsewhere. The writer comes across as a splendid man with a sound sense of duty, professionalism and compassion. Very highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great insight into the issues facing a Battleship and Naval ..., 18 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Great insight into the issues facing a Battleship and Naval commander in this period. Not too dry and his understated opinion of some of the War departments decisions shows a real idea of what the people at the sharp end had to deal with. If you are looking for high adventure (Biggles on the sea) its not for you, but if you are looking to understand the realities of WW1 well worth reading
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars, 13 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Informative but a bit of a dry read
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A little bit boring at times but it did have some personal feelings ..., 2 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
A little bit boring at times but it did have some personal feelings behind it. A good intro to the military mind set when battle looms.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, 28 Jun 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Whilst this book was written as an after action report/journal by the author, it gives a tremendous insight into the dardanelles campaign and a part of WW 1 that is seldom talked about I'll definitely be reading this again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good reflection of the Navy in the early part of the Great war., 28 July 2014
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This review is from: My War at Sea 1914-1916: A Captain's Life with the Royal Navy during the First World War (Kindle Edition)
Very interesting reading @ a time of crisis with the changes in naval warfare in the greatwar. A good read for those interested
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