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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 8 September 2014
The F9F was the USNs and USMCs replacement for the piston powered F8F Bearcat and an entry into the jet age. As such it got thrown into the Korean War in July 1950 and stayed as a presence to the very end in 1953, with credible successes in the fighter escort and much more importantly, the ground attack role.

The book is divided into two main parts, with the former covering the USN use and the latter then switching over to the USMC experience. As with others in the series, you get a rich pictorial accompaniment (both in the form of period photographs as well as well executed colour plates), lots of first hand accounts from the pilots operating the type in Korea, and a good overview of the operations of each units that flew the type, even if you sometimes need to search for it (or rather read the book from cover to cover) to get it.

The added speed and the relatively concentrated punch from its four 20mm cannons in the nose made it a surprisingly effective platform for suppressing enemy air defences and much of the role seems to have been just that in the later years - with some hunter killer operations involving tanks, trucks and trains thrown in. While combat air patrols and general fighter roles were also performed (in principle), it seems that effective combat with enemy air units almost did not take place.

As such there were only five aerial victories recorded (in one engagement) and only a handful of losses appear to have been officially attributed to the presence of enemy fighters. Flak was much more of a threat, even if the official reporting appears to attribute the vast majority of the 110 or so lost (USN plus USMC) to technical issues, pilot error or fuel starvation.

There are also some interesting factoids thrown in, such as the rather less illustrious early career of Neil Armstrong (of later NASA fame) - he got shot down.

Overall a very good start to covering the combat operations of this early jet type, on which there is much less material available than on the more illustrious F-84s or F-86s.
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on 9 January 2015
As with all this series it provides a good overview of the type and the conflict. It seemed a little light on the thing that make this series valuable, that is the personal recollections and/or the after action reports. Not that there aren't any just not as many as in some others.

The illustrations are up to the usual high standards and inspiring if you happen to be a scale modeller.

Over good but not great.
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on 26 July 2015
REALLY FANTASTIC BOOK,SO VERY INTERESTING.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 21 August 2014
GREAT TRANSACTION - THANKYOU
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