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4.8 out of 5 stars
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on 26 June 2014
Rem are one of the great bands, these songs are stripped back to the basics , and still sound fantastic, michaels voice shines through, full of emotion. A great set list ,high lights for me , would have to be country feedback ,find the river ,and fall on me
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on 24 June 2014
Purchased this for my husband who is a large REM fan. Great accoustic set and excellent value for money with the MP3 version included.
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on 24 June 2014
If you are an REM fan, this album is amazing. Always disappointed if Everybody Hurts doesn't feature somewhere but can't have it all.
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on 17 June 2014
I've been a fan of REM since my early teens, and made a point of buying all of their albums. I saw them in concert in Nottingham in 2005, and I've got a VHS bootleg of the Live at MTV 1991 set. It's fair to say I'm an entrenched fan, so I was sad when they announced that the end was nigh a few years back. So, as soon as I saw this live set was being released, I knew I'd have to have it. It IS worth every single second of sound. Superb to hear the live sets - who cares if there's no new material coming out - I cannot rate this highly enough. My only quibble? It's too short! I want more!
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on 27 May 2014
I caught the end of the 1991 session on TV and could never find a bootleg worth having. Now I have the real thing. It's so sad that I will never hear the like of it in real life again.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 3 September 2014
Well, it's a tough call, but you know how it is. On the first disc, they rule the world through the power of the mandolin, and it's worth five stars. The second disc is just tired, and deserves only two. The 1991 disc I have had on bootleg since 1993 when I found it in the UK, and it's been on rotation ever since. I have also several other boots from that same 1991 era of shows, including perfect performances from the UK together with Mr Bragg, who's got more funny jokes to tell than my uncle. This version of the 1991 show has the clear edge for being of such high sound quality. "Fall on Me" kills me every time. I think I only bought it for the sound quality of the 1991 one, which I knew must be awesome. The 2001 one I could just throw away.
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on 3 August 2014
This unplugged album by REM makes you realise what were missing from the boys from Athens Georgia!, never afraid to mix up the big hits with album anthems and just rareties that they love performing.
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on 5 August 2014
Just brilliant a great mixture of old and new, it takes you back to the early 90s when rem were in there prime. A great album.
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on 10 August 2014
Utterly brilliant and the free amazon download is fantastic too
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Now in their third year of retirement, and six years since their last live show, R.E.M. As was, are slowly moving from a band that was real to a band that isn't. All that remains are the recordings, the films, the vinyl, the memories. For a band that, in the 90's, took two extended gaps from touring (of six years and four years, respectively), R.E.M. Seemed to wear themselves out after a frantic decade of 1999-2008 that saw them traverse the planet five times and play every year in support of four albums. Though this – their third official live album, alongside the nine concert DVD's and the limited edition “Live '92” cassette – sees the beginning of saturation coverage of their on stage personality, unlike other records of theirs, “Unplugged” sees the release for the first time, the bands full acoustic MTV sessions from 1991 and 2001. Two lineups, two bands, one name. With barely one song repeated across the sets ; “Losing My Religion”, this features the band at two points : one on the cusp of enormity, a band taking a step back from the glare of attention and scrutiny, and the other in 2001, the R.E.M. trio with two extra guitarists and a new drummer. 2001 R.E.M sees the band as a post-fame entity, existing the rarified atmosphere of megasuccess with only a handful of contemporaries at that time, beyond such trivial concerns as money, hits, success, able to exist as a self-contained artistic entity capable of working entirely in their own world. Not that this necessarily shows ; audibly, there is little difference between the two bands, though Stipe's voice has aged mildly, all other things seem untouched. Both bands and both sets dip deep into the bands body of work, pulling out deep album cuts from across their history ; 2001's set particularly interests, seeing the somewhat anodyne and limp cuts from the “Reveal” album as acoustic gems when stripped of their electronic bleepybloop and lifeless death-by-1,000-mixes studio incarnations. Both sets lack a sense of shape, for example, the 1991 set finishes with “World Leader Pretend”, whilst 2001 climaxes – though that is not the word – on five then-very-recent album tracks, including as the last song, the adequate “Sad Professor”. In their acoustic forms, these newer songs sparkle in a way their studio counterparts often don't, but 14 years after the event with no reason for their release, “Unplugged” is a good but pointless R.E.M release.
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