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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you enjoy watching TV you'll enjoy this book, 30 Dec. 2009
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Bantam Dave (Bradford, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Shouting at the Telly (Paperback)
Go anywhere where people are holding conversations and it is a fair bet that sooner or later you will hear somebody talking about what they watched last night on TV. It's ironic that the thing that many people say is killing the art of conversation, television, is also one of the things that most people have conversations about. In short, people love to talk (and read) about TV; we enjoy finding out if anybody else as seen or remembers a particular programme and whether they thought it was good or bad as we thought it was.

This is what makes this book - a collection of articles about TV old and new - such an engrossing read. The subjects covered are very diverse; none are that serious though and most are a little offbeat. For example there are articles about things like TV themes and the old ITV regional logos's and there are also articles that ponder subjects such like why bosses on TV are always completely useless. Granted, because the articles are written by a number of different people, the quality of the pieces are variable. This means that some are a bit of a waste of ink but most are good and many are very good.

As each article is quite short, usually about three or four pages long, this is an excellent book to dip in and out of, perhaps whilst there is nothing worth watching on TV.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than anything on the telly., 6 Nov. 2009
This review is from: Shouting at the Telly (Paperback)
Interesting to read people who are inside the industry talking about the way TV imprints and influences us from an early age. It was very funny, well paced and had a really good range of contributers - a good 'grown up book' rater than those stupid talking heads on TV countdown shows who are just reading of cue cards. I really liked it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A fun, if short, nostalgia-filled book, 3 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Shouting at the Telly (Paperback)
'Shouting at the Telly' is a collection of essays about television edited by John Grindrod. The writings come from a variety of people from BAFTA-winning Rebecca Front to TV music composer Daniel Pemberton (who wrote the 'pop pop pop' sounds in Peep Show - and an awful lot of other stuff). At a little over 200 pages and often only 3 pages per essay, it makes for a quick read. Some of its strength, though, does come from having 36 contributers; if you are not keen on a particular topic or the style of a particular writer, it's soon over and you can move on to the next chapter.

The book presents a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia trip to TV shows past (some more recent than others) and, as such, some prior knowledge is required - I have never seen 'Falcon's Crest', 'Howard's End' or 'Upstairs, Downstairs', for example, so some of the comments/jokes were lost on me. Fortunately, though, there is YouTube et al, so if you want to see what a writer is talking about, or feel in the mood for some nostalgia yourself, you can always have a quick search for it. While there is much poking-fun, it is all done with affection, making it quite a sweet book and a nice gift to (or treat for) any 30-something TV lover.
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Shouting at the Telly
Shouting at the Telly by John Grindrod
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