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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Monster Rave 'n' Luna Party
The first question I had to ask myself upon viewing this movie on DVD was why has it been issued with a "15" certificate? I was always under the impression that this was an attempt to produce a horror movie that could appeal to kids and adults. In fact I remember watching a feature about the making of this movie on the ITV children's programme Clapperboard when I was...
Published on 29 Mar 2007 by Jeremy W. Newbould

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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Camp, and just a little bit Creepy
Horror author R Chetwynd Hayes (played by John Carradine) is walking home late one night when he is accosted by a starving Vincent Price. When the author says he would do anything to help, Price gratefully latches his fangs onto Carradine's neck -- but not fatally. Brushing themselves down after a brief but civilised vamp, Price invites his benefactor to the Monster Club,...
Published on 28 Dec 2006 by Murray


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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Monster Rave 'n' Luna Party, 29 Mar 2007
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The first question I had to ask myself upon viewing this movie on DVD was why has it been issued with a "15" certificate? I was always under the impression that this was an attempt to produce a horror movie that could appeal to kids and adults. In fact I remember watching a feature about the making of this movie on the ITV children's programme Clapperboard when I was only about 11 or 12 years old! There is no explicit sex or nudity in this film, no obscene language and no graphic violence so the "15" certificate is baffling to me. I have seen PG and 12 certificate movies with stronger content than this one!

Anyway, onto the film itself... The first thing that struck me about this movie was the impressive cast list. There are three great horror stalwarts in it - Vincent Price, John Carradine and Donald Pleasence. There are also some other actors and actresses who have appeared in well-known horror movies in the cast - Richard Johnson (Zombie Flesh Eaters), Anthony Valentine (To The Devil.... A Daughter), Simon Ward (Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed), Patrick Magee (A Clockwork Orange, Asylum, Tales From The Crypt) & Britt Ekland (Asylum, The Wicker Man), for example.

The premise and wrap-around-story involves the horror novelist Ronald Chetwynd-Hayes (Carradine) encountering a hungry vampire called Eramus (Price) one night whilst looking in a book shop window full of his own works. Eramus suddenly bites Chetwynd-Hayes on the neck to fulfil his desperate craving for fresh blood. Eramus tells the writer that he did not bite deep enough to transform him into a vampire and as a "thank you" for becoming an unexpected blood donor Eramus invites him to a special place called The Monster Club.

Upon arrival at the club they are escorted to the vampire's favourite coffin-shaped table and Eramus orders a glass of Type O blood because Type B is off! The waiter (who is also a vampire) suggests to Chetwynd-Hayes that he orders a tomato juice to look less conspicuous! As they sip their respective beverages, Chetwynd-Hayes, the one human in the entire joint, notices an unusual chart on the wall nearby. Eramus explains that this is a monster's genealogical chart and describes the creatures which would be produced if different monsters and their hybrids were to mate with each other. I must say this is an ingenious and original idea and it forms the basis of the three creepy stories in this film. At the bottom of the monster hierarchy is the shadmock, a creature which possesses a deadly whistle of all things! This leads us onto the first story.

The second story is a vampire tale which is very much fang-in-cheek but it is the final story, involving the humegoo creature from the chart and a village of ghouls, which is the creepiest and best of the bunch. The foundation of this particular segment involves a horror movie director (played by Stuart Whitman) who is searching for atmospheric locations for his latest movie. His search leads him to the strange village of Loughville (not to be confused with Loughborough) where he meets Luna who is a humegoo (the offspring of a ghoul and a human - what a horrible thought) and discovers the village's dreadful macabre secret. There are some seriously spine-chilling moments in this third story, particularly the moment when the film director reads the clergyman's journal in the now desolate church, and there is a literally ghoulish twist ending.

In between each story segment we are "treated" to very dated and sometimes embarrassing musical numbers by bands and artists who seem to have faded from memory nowadays - does anyone remember B.A. Robertson? It is rather amusing to see Messrs Price & Carradine strutting their stuff near the end of this film though!

One song by a band called Night, sung by a red-haired female lead singer who would make a good scream queen, is called Stripper and serves as the soundtrack to a bizarre strip-tease routine where the lady removes more than just her clothes, not that we see any actual nudity - as I said earlier this film was originally aimed at kids as well as adults so the strip routine is shown in silhouette form when it reaches the nitty-gritty part then changes to animation for the unusual finale.

On the whole, this is a very entertaining film with a wonderful cast. I especially like the ending where Eramus proposes that, because he is a human, Chetwynd-Hayes should become a member of The Monster Club as humans are the ultimate monsters. He then proceeds to explain to his grotesque fellow members about all the murderous weapons that humans have invented and the variety of methods humans have used to destroy fellow humans! Who can argue with that? This 'Who are the real monsters?' message reminded me of the 'Who are the cannibals?' statement at the very end of Ruggero Deodato's notorious Cannibal Holocaust. Who would have thought that a comparison could be made between a kids' horror film and one of the most infamous of all the so-called video nasties?

There are no special features on this DVD - I do not count scene selection as a special feature as this is something that should be standard on any DVD. So this is just a bare bones release then (sorry about the pun) but if you are a Vincent Price fan or just a fan of horror movies in general then this is worth having in your collection.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Camp, and just a little bit Creepy, 28 Dec 2006
Horror author R Chetwynd Hayes (played by John Carradine) is walking home late one night when he is accosted by a starving Vincent Price. When the author says he would do anything to help, Price gratefully latches his fangs onto Carradine's neck -- but not fatally. Brushing themselves down after a brief but civilised vamp, Price invites his benefactor to the Monster Club, where he proceeds to relate three tales about the various types of monster on the club's genealogical chart.

We start off with a twist on the Beauty and the Beast formula, featuring the lonely-but-rich Shadmock (the mongrel of the monster world), whose whistle has a particularly gruesome effect. Then, played for laughs rather than horror, the story of a young boy whose father is a Vampire, and who unwittingly reveals the fact to a group of sinister government vampire-hunters, led by the ever-watchable Donald Pleasance. Thirdly, the segment that brought me back to this film -- its ending haunted me as a kid from when I saw it at the cinema. (When I must have been 9 years old, so something was wrong there...) A horror-film director, scouting for authentically creepy locations, happens upon a backward village in the mists, a village named Loughville -- "Lough" being, of course, an anagram of what the villagers really are.

Bizarrely, in between the horror segments, we get three competent-but-forgettable songs from bands currently residing in the "Where are they now?" files of post-punk pop. Camp and creepy rather than genuinely horrifying, and rather lower in budget than I remember, The Monster Club was worth the re-watch, but only just.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Old style horror, 22 April 2009
By 
Mr. S. P. Gibson (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I was 9 years old when this film came out and thought it was fantastic. Happily I can still say the same. All three stories are cleverly thought out. The last story is very atmospheric and creepy. Each story is interspersed with great music from the late 70's. Oddly though I do remember that the film was rated PG in 1980 but this release is rated 15. Excellent film with Vincent price. A nice retro horror film.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars better than the uk version., 15 Jan 2010
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This version has a few extras that the uk version dosent have.It has an audio commentary,pages of biographies of the main cast and crew,a still gallery,an essay on the movie and production notes which are all very interesting.It also has the music from the movie which can be played separately,lasting over 40mins, and the trailer(2:20) .There is also an easter egg which can be got from the special features menu, just go to the right and an icon will come up on the coat of one of the figures in the background picture.It is a 12 minute interview with a cast member.Nice little set.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A guilty pleasure of mine but better picture quality than ever on blu-ray - shame about the mono soundtrack, 18 Aug 2014
By 
Vinman666 (Essex, U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Monster Club [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
The Monster Club is a low budget British horror film that follows the portmanteau style of multiple short stories linked by a common theme. These types of film were very popular in the 1970s, with Amicus Productions being responsible for several classic examples such as Tales From The Crypt and From Beyond The Grave.

The Monster Club is different in that the common theme surrounds a nightclub specifically for 'monsters' - vampires, ghouls and werewolves as you would imagine, plus some more unusual examples. Because it's a nightclub, music features quite heavily in the soundtrack. John WIlliams (the classical guitarist, not the Star Wars composer) contributes background music, as do UB40. But there are also 'live' performances by several acts in the club itself, notably New Wave star B.A.Robertson and 1970's rock band The Pretty Things.

I first saw this movie on TV back in the mid-1980s and fell in love with it. It's tacky - the special effects range from the reasonably impressive to the downright amateurish (eyes on springs, anyone?), and the stories vary in quality - the first is the best, the second played for laughs and the last has one or two genuinely creepy moments. The music itself isn't great but on the other hand isn't bad by any means. Why do I like it then? Because it's knowingly dumb and tacky, which is quite different to something which is unintentionally bad; the actors look like they're genuinely enjoying themselves and nobody takes themselves too seriously.

I had a copy of this film on VHS (recorded from the TV long ago) and also a budget DVD which came out a few years back, so I'm used to grainy footage and assumed this was partly due to the low budget nature of the film. The blu-ray case blurb states that the hi-def transfer was made from original film elements but I still didn't expect much. Only last night I watched the new blu-ray edition of Glory!, remastered from 4k elements and trumpeted as being produced solely with picture quality in mind. What a disappointment that was, proving that unless the source material is pristine the old saying about silk purse and sow's ear is still true. Imagine my surprise to find that whoever transferred The Monster Club has done an incredible job - I have NEVER seen this film looks so good. Details are sharp, colours are saturated and the contrast in the many dark scenes is brilliant. The soundtrack is unfortunately in mono and has not been improved to the same degree as the picture but is still better than my old DVD copy.

Special Features
Personally, one of my favourite things about the film is the song The Stripper by a band called Night. Their lineup featured Chris Thompson (of Manfred Mann's Earth Band fame) and lead singer Stevie Lange. I love her voice and the two best examples for me are her single Remember My Name and the song featured in this film. The original soundtrack album for The Monster Club is extremely rare so I think I've watched this movie on DVD dozens of times just to listen to that song. Why am I talking about this so much? Because one of the special features on this blu-ray version is the isolated audio track, which makes the music available without any background dialogue (though the levels do dip at those points). I was really excited about this when it was announced as it was rumoured that the soundtrack album was going to be included. It seems this is as close as we are going to get - a little disappointing as it is in mono as well. This could have been a five star rating otherwise.

Other features are the original trailer, an image gallery and some other promotional materials.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kooky and Silly- But It Works., 14 April 2013
The Monster Club up until 2008's Stuck was the final film by Amicus. This was their 8th anthology- coming out 7 years after From Beyond the Grave. It is without doubt also their most comedy themed film, although The Vault of Horrors runs it close.

The Monster Club is either loved or hated- partly due to the fact that the film seems a complete different entity to the famous 7 which preceded it. But however silly at times the movie is, it does have it's serious parts.

The wraparound story boasts the supreme talent of both Vincent Price and John Carradine. Price the vampire (his only vampire role) invites Carradine to his club, where there he tells him a selection of stories.

The first segment is fairly effective. A lonely ghoul who needs help with his belongings in his mansion. He receives it, however the scheming woman is really after his jewels and money. Just turn the sound down when he whistels, trust me it's sound advice.

The second story possibly had some potential, but for me, did not work. It's about a vampire dad and the less said about it the better. It does however feature Donald Pleasance.

The final segment, is easily the best story and is quite eerie if not scary in places. Obviously filmed on the grounds of shepperton- you'll be able to recognise a few sights from The House that Dripped Blood. This one involves an American film director looking for the ultimate location- naturally he gets more than he bargained for from the locals. A good story, that works well.

Between stories, we are treated, or treated not to some pop, punk, rock fusion. Very embedded in the early 80s. Whilst no doubt some tracks are catchy, it's nothing more than a goofy venture and a few laughs to be had.

So, Monster Club is certainly a different affair from other Amicus offerings. However with two good stories out of three and the appearances of Price and Carradine, this is good stuff for the horror fan.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monsters Rule OK!, 22 Jun 2000
This review is from: The Monster Club [VHS] (VHS Tape)
I have grown up with this movie and to be honest I dont know what I would ever do without it. It has to be one of the greatest movies of all time, it certainly is mine, up there with The Goonies and Police Academy. It is nice to see Brit Ekland but I personally have to say that the Club Secretary steals the show.
The make up and effects of the film are amazing. When I first saw this film I found it hard to believe that the peaople in the film were not real monsters! I suppose I still have my doubts. Recently re-released this is a treat for all film lovers. Personally I think children should be treated to a look at this and the 15 certificate puzzles me as this is nothing but a fun film containing no sex, violence or whatever.
Do try this film, but remember to cover your ears when the Shadmock whistles, he'll turn you to tofee!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An entertaining, humerous horror film packed with twists., 9 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Monster Club [VHS] (VHS Tape)
The Monster Club is a masterpiece of the short story horror genre that comes with a twist in every tale. Set in a murky backstreet somewhere in the uk the story revolves around two central characters R. Chetwynd-Hayes who, incidently, is also the author of the book entitled "The Monster Club" and a vampire called Aramis. Aramis happens accross Chetwynd-Hayes in a deserted alleyway in close proximity to a bookshop selling Chetwynd-Hayes titles. After helping Aramis out who his predicament, that being a lack of human blood, Aramis realises who's blood he has taken/sucked. He is totally mortified as the Monster community hold Chetwynd-Hayes in high regard for his literary talent as a horror author. To repay him Aramis invites him to "The Monster Club" to obtain new material for his next book which comes in the form of 3 short stories. The club scenes are fantastic, it is plainly obvious the film was produced on a very low budget as you will see from the costumes and masks of the revellers however this should be taken in good humour with the rest of the film as it all seems to add to it's appeal. Watch out for the stripper scene, it's a real eye opener, and the werewolf club secretary is superb. The story ends with Chetwynd-Hayes being ask to join the club as a member of the human race, THE GREATEST MONSTER OF THEM ALL! The short stories are great as are the guest bands.There is even a guest appearance by Fran Fullenweider! All in all The Monster Club is a brilliant film that should be watched by everyone who possesses a sense of humour, as long as you are above 15 years of age of course. A totally enjoyable 90 minutes, don't delay, watch it today.
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3.0 out of 5 stars clash of fashions, 11 Sep 2014
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This review is from: The Monster Club [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Firstly, the plus points of the Monster Club. The uk blu ray is a delightful bright picture, with more than ample mono sound. Vibrant generally, and suitably widescreen considering the less than pleasant previous dvd release. This title looms from the very ebb of the seventies, lurching into the eighties, which might well explain to all who weren't there, why there is so much on brightly lit display of the older and new styles, classic horror thespians & garish modern clobber, clashing together on every level.

Taking as the jumping off point the works of R. Chetwynd Hayes, the concept of the 3 story film in the modern milieu sounds a promising one. To some extent it certainly is, parading the grotesqueries before us at a fair lick of pace. The original author has written some fine eerie yet humourous flavoured macabre pieces that touch slightly on E.C. comics or brush up against Charles Birkin. But Chetwynd-Hayes is his own eccentric flavour, check out Cradle Demon, or The Partaker, or even My Mother Married a Vampire to get a taste of his style. In this Amicus-esque flick we get two old stalwart classic horror names providing the wrap-around story. The three stories are varying from tragic to pathos, to predictable twist ending, like the e.c. comics of yore and similar. Donald Pleasance does a fine quick turn as a very english head of a clerical death-squad in a tale that delights even now with a twist on the usual vampiric standards.

However, one flaw to this later attempt to relaunch the ageing anthology format, is the musical interludes. If only they interluded a bit more to the point of being edited to a skeletal silhouette, like the fun stripper sequence. The music is jarring, tacky and dare i say it, lacking in memorable visual or lyrical cues. It all seems to be mashed in from another movie, which regrettably Subotsky & Co. had a fondness for the musical 'cultural' happenings, as evidenced by their other output. Some folk might see it with nostalgic eyes firmly on the whole, as part of the reckless modernism. Some might just put it on the same cruddy level with the masked club members, who hail in the eighties with a rancid lack of taste...

Excellent moments, creepy concepts, eerie touches and flourishes. Doesn't sit on the same gravestone as earlier portmanteau films, but at the very least nostalgic assistance provided, it looks and sounds great to any wishing to paddle in the old brook before it dried up completely.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lot of fun, 9 Oct 2012
By 
Don D (Manchester) - See all my reviews
Well, this has a great cast and the stories are fantastic. The great Vincent Price is on good form as a vampire called Erasmus who takes a horror writer for a drink after the latter does him the favour of saving his life. We get three vignette stories around various types of monsters, and while some of it looks very cheesy the overall effect is there. This is a good strong 70's horror, and I recommend it. I'm taking a star off because some of the musical interludes are just terrible, in my humble opinion.
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