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5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another release from the UK History Of Soul label that should not be overlooked, 25 April 2014
This review is from: Down In The Basement : Soul From New York Volume 2 (Audio CD)
‘Lonely Avenue’, the first volume of History Of Soul’s ‘Soul From New York’ somehow passed me by (so far) but I’ve just taken a look at the track listing thereof and, as with this second (excellently titled!) volume, I see there is a similar mix of the familiar and what are, to me at least, the more obscure, pretty much balancing out 50-50. The 28-page accompanying booklet, with fulsome notes from John Ridley, throws perfect light on all the tracks and artists involved and the 56 tracks provide further examples of the roots of New York soul, the earliest cuts going back to 1956, Joe Tex’s somewhat bluesy, choir-supported ‘My Biggest Mistake’ being a King release from January of that year, Little Willie John’s more upbeat ‘My Nerves’ emanating from the same label in June, Clyde McPhatter’s more rocking ‘Thirty Days’ making its appearance on Atlantic a month later and Wynonie Harris’ ‘Tell A Whale Of A Tale’ - think on the lines of the ‘Guys And Dolls’ show song, ‘Sit Down You’re Rocking The Boat’ - coming from Atco in October. Selections then run through to 1962, that year’s offerings including the set’s overall opener, Dolores Johnson’s forcefully-belted, slow-rolling Carnival outing, ‘What Kind Of Man Are You’, Ann Cole answering Etta James with her Roulette recording, ‘Don’t Stop The Wedding’, Gerri Granger - no stranger to ‘answer records’ herself - delivering a bouncy ‘Ain’t That Funny’, a Big Top release and Timi Yuro providing the ultimate closer with the splendid ‘What’s A Matter Baby’. Needless to say there are far too many titles here to look at each individually but, stopping off at a few points on the way, from cd-one let me heartily recommend Doris Troy’s early rocker, issued as by Doris Payne, ‘You Better Mind’ (from Shirley in 1960), Jimmy Barnes’ choir-supported ballad, ‘No Regrets’(Gibralter, 1958) and Betty O’Brien’s toe-tapping, harmonica-supported ‘Why Me’ (Liberty 1961). Over on cd-two, I’ll just turn the spotlight on Barbara McNair’s ‘He’s A King’, a 1960 easy-swinger cut for Signature in 1960, the Matadors’ slow-chugging ‘You’d Be Crying Too’, a fine Keith recording from 1962 and the jazz-slanted exchanges between LaVern Baker and Jimmy Ricks on the 1960 Atlantic opus, ‘You’re The Boss’ and add that this is yet another release from the UK History Of Soul label that should not be overlooked.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 20 Aug 2014
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PAUL NEEDHAM (DERBY, DERBYSHIRE United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Down In The Basement : Soul From New York Volume 2 (Audio CD)
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Down In The Basement : Soul From New York Volume 2
Down In The Basement : Soul From New York Volume 2 by Various Artists (Audio CD - 2014)
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