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5.0 out of 5 stars A quick snapshot on the landscape of social media and the tip to excel in major social media scenses!
This book provides a quick snapshot on the landscape of social media and the tip to excel in major social media scenses, such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Linkedin, SlideShare, Youtube, etc. Tips about the content prepartion, and social media value assessment, and case study are also demostrated to pinpoint the social media essentials. Very easy to read. SEO and...
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesnt go far enough
Agree with the reviewer that stated it should be called 'why Social Media'. Ultimately the book wasn't what I had hoped for and doesn't expand on the marketing options available to you. Also, and this is a minor point as it's the content that counts, but it looks as if it's been designed in Word. The layout and illustration is dreadful which does put you off. I'd assumed...
Published 6 months ago by SilverSurfer


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5.0 out of 5 stars A quick snapshot on the landscape of social media and the tip to excel in major social media scenses!, 22 April 2015
This book provides a quick snapshot on the landscape of social media and the tip to excel in major social media scenses, such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Linkedin, SlideShare, Youtube, etc. Tips about the content prepartion, and social media value assessment, and case study are also demostrated to pinpoint the social media essentials. Very easy to read. SEO and social media in tandem can always boost online publicity efficienly. For further reading, Integrated Search Marketing Solution & Organic Search: Search Engine Optimization, Social Media, and Email Marketing: Winning Formula for SERP Dominance is an excllenet tool book to refer to. It addresses the most critical topics and tactics in the online marketing for a business: SEO, social media and Email Marketing at one central location. The book covers huge technical grounds in SEO, social media and email marketing in great details. It shows the readers the technical tips in on-page, off-page, server-side optimization and link building tactics while showing them the codes that are ready to use . Its critical tactics in FB marketing based on role playing will open your eyes. In addition, it gives the readers not only SEO Tips but also proven email marketing management tactics by tweaking the key email elements that they can apply right away.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gets to the essentials of social media marketing, 9 May 2014
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There’s no shortage of guides on social media marketing. Unfortunately, a lot of them are superficial and lacking in practical advice that companies can actually use. They describe what the various social media platforms can do but usually fail to explain why companies need to treat social media differently to other media; the broadcast model does not work in the interactive world.

Fortunately, Mark Schaefer has produced a short book which gets to the heart of how companies should approach integrating social media into their marketing strategies. For around £7 ($10) its 139 pages presents a practical primer to what social media can do for marketers and questions that business leaders need to ask themselves before posting anything online.

Humans Buy From Humans

A couple of years ago, Euan Semple wrote a book, Organisations Don’t Tweet, People Do in which he pointed out how human connection is at the heart of meditated communication platforms such as Twitter and Facebook. We use these services to find and share information and they work best when we make connections with other “real” people. Schaefer adopts a similar approach and reminds us that,

"We’re returning to the way people have ALWAYS wanted to buy from us – person to person. Humans buy from humans. And now you have the opportunity to humanize your company and join in the commercial renaissance too."

Using real examples he shows us how companies, large (McDonalds) and small (Dessert Gallery) have successfully presented a human face to their customers and prospects via social media.

Schaefer also tackles the question asked by many social media doubters, “What’s the ROI?”. However, unlike many social media “experts” who claim the ROI cannot be measured so we could not even try, he says,

"As marketers we should measure EVERYTHING. And generally we can."

He then goes on to explain some of the simple quantitative metrics we can use to track progress. BUT more importantly he discusses the qualitative measures which may be hard to quantify but which, nonetheless, can have important impacts on our bottom line. Schaefer recommends that companies maintain their own blog as a central hub from which to build their social media efforts. This is good advice as a blog gives you more control over the content you produce than only relying on Facebook or Twitter to spread your message. On pages 56 to 58 he gives 25 tangible but non-financial benefits of maintaining a company blog. If you rely on your website to generate sales then Reason 1 is probably most significant,

"SEO – Having an active, relevant blog can provide a powerful impact on search engine ranking."

This probably holds more true today than in the past, with Google’s recent algorithm changes putting a higher emphasis on quality, original content than ever before.

In Section 2 he goes through 5 difficult questions that any company thinking of engaging in social media marketing should ask themselves. He offers practical steps to help answer these questions and at the end presents a case study to show how his advice was taken up by a real B2B company to help generate $47 million in new business.

Section 3 is a concise primer on the different social media platforms and their specific strengths and weaknesses for different markets.

Overall, this is an excellent little book that distills down years of experience from a marketer who really “gets” social media. If you’re new to social media marketing, considering adopting it in your business or wondering why your efforts so far have failed, then this is a great place to start. Think carefully about the questions at the end of each chapter and you’ll avoid going down the blind alleys that many companies find themselves stuck in when they start tweeting.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Social media explained to the real world: Well structured, actionable advice, 14 Mar. 2014
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I live and work in digital marketing, I read (to varying degrees that each book deserves) most key titles across the subject. Most are OK and long winded, few are exceptional. I can safely say that this is THE best book on social media. Not for just helping me get better at explaining social media to business, but also offering new a whole new bunch of ideas in the process. Well structured, actionable advice that you can take in over a few short hours of study.

I'm a brand new fan-boy and convert, thanks Mark.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No jargon, no hype. Lots of examples and varied case studies. A great resource., 4 Sept. 2014
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Having read other books and work authored by Mark W Schaefer, I was expecting this book to do just what "it says on the tin". And, indeed, the book, which is aimed at business executives, considers how social media helps organisations understand the market, connect with customers and stand apart from competition. Moreover, the book does so in a very clear and engaging style, which is why I am adding it to my course syllabus.

This book is also very relevant for those of us using social media as individuals, rather than representing an institution, and who are unsure how to derive value from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, blogging and so on.

The book is organised in 3 sections. In the first section, the author outlines the key changes in the business context and why these require organisations to engage with social media. For instance, as more of us turn to the social web for product discovery and education, and as we increasingly resist blunt sales approaches, so organisations need to populate the web with helpful content that answers potential customers' questions and drives them to the company's website. In addition to identifying the challenges, Schaefer discusses how organisations can address them - for the example discussed (i.e., produce discovery), the book discusses how organisations can identify and answer customers' questions, and disseminate the content in ways that will get it noticed by customers at key stages of their journey.

In section two, Schaefer addresses common questions raised by those grappling with social media. The questions considered range from "Do I need Social Media?" to "How do I handle negative comments?", and the if-I-got-a-coin-everytime-somebody-asks-me-this-question-I-would-be-a-millionaire issue of "What's the ROI of Social Media?". The questions are discussed very pragmatically and, I think, the answers provided will help you face the most sceptic of CEOs or CFOs.

In the third and final section, the author provides a brief overview of the main social media platforms, with emphasis on `brief'. This section tells us what platforms are out there, their relative advantages and disadvantages, and the uses for business. This is not a detailed `how to guide', however and any one expecting that will be disappointed (though, Schaefer has also authored guides on Twitter and Blogging which you may find very helpful).

All this advice is very nice and good, but what do you do with it if, like me, you are active on social media as an individual, as opposed to representing an institution? Is this book still relevant for you?

Well, we may not have a clearly defined competitor. But, with the average millennial spending over 5 hours a day with content created by their peers, we certainly need to do a good job with our posts, pictures and videos to get attention from our followers and connections.

Likewise, we may not have a profit and loss statement to complete but, when we are `doing' social media alongside our jobs and/or family commitments we surely need to make very difficult decisions about how we use our time, technical resources and, indeed, money.

And while we may not have a CEO or group of shareholders to report to, many of us will have faced scepticism and impatience from relatives, colleagues or employers - Tell me again why you are (wasting that time) doing that social media thing?!

We may not have a product to trade, but we are putting our ideas and experiences out there for others to scrutinise.

We may not have a market with well-defined segments, but we are under no illusion that there are different groups of people connected with us online - e.g. relatives, former class mates, current colleagues, people that we never met but that share an hobby or other interest with us, and so on. We connect with each group on different platforms, at varying frequencies. And each group will value different content.

And, instead of money, the value that we get from pouring our hearts and souls into this, could take the form of attention from a targeted audience (e.g., a potential employer or literary agent), or social contact with and advice from other individuals in similar circumstances (e.g., living with a chronic disease, moving to a foreign country or raising a large family). It could also take the form of feedback or input that helps us to develop an idea (e.g., for a book), or simply be a repository for content (e.g., a collection of personal memories or of examples for teaching).

Once we make these adjustments to the basic business terminology, the lessons from this book are just as relevant for individuals struggling to use social media effectively, as they are for business executives considering a social media strategy for their organisations.

The book is written in a really accessible style, with minimum jargon. It has plenty of examples and case studies from various countries and a variety of business scenarios. And it is very reasonably priced. Overall, this is a great resource. I read it twice already, I have been recommending it far and wide to business connections and students, and I foresee that I will be referring to this little book over and over, again, in my work and as a user of social media.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should have been entitled "Why Social Media?", 21 Sept. 2014
By 
Mr. J. Chereau "jlchereau" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Short, effective and convincing regarding the reasons to do social media marketing and the content that can be leveraged in order to get started. But this book should have been entitled "Why Social Media?" because it ends where I need to start: "I am already convinced, I have gathered content, what's next?". This book lacks hands-on information about the implementation of a social media strategy on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and other platforms.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read, 7 Sept. 2014
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I was first a bit skeptical if you can really explain Social Media on just 130 pages. But believe me Mark Schaefer can do this. This book focuses on the essentials. No nonsense marketing bla bla - every page gives you more ideas. In addition Mark Schaefer's way of writing is really inspiring. If you are short on time but want to know the essentials of Social Media marketing you need to read this book
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why would you want to read a book about an ever changing subject?, 30 Mar. 2015
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Social Media Explained by Mark W. Schaefer is not a book about Social Media platforms and how they work. Neither shall you expect details on the best strategy for your business to be seen on any particular social site.

This is a book about the Fundamental Principles that drive Social Media Marketing Success, regardless of changes in platform popularity or functionality.

Mark Schaefer provides MARKETING solutions…. and Marketing…. is timeless.

Social Media Explained is a guide for busy executives to harness the power of the social media web.

The book is divided into:

- two sections of 5 (short) chapters that end with 3-4 questions for leaders to consider,
- a case study that illustrates the concepts in action,
- a social media primer that includes some of the major platforms.

In this review, I’ll focus on the first 2 sections that make most of the book.

SECTION ONE. The five principles that drive Social Media Marketing:

1. Social Media platforms have allowed marketers to go back to direct contact between customers and business owners, as if they were face to face. This is something that was taken away from the buying process when the printed press and later radio and TV took over as providers of information to the masses. Online, businesses can prove useful to their followers and grab their attention in a place where they choose to spend their time. Businesses can get feedback on a number of issues, be recommended to friends and family and share the latest news in a kind of virtual ‘town square’.
2. Social Media allows businesses to interact with their customers or potential customers on regular basis by showing that they care and allowing them to win people’s trust.
3. There is a different mindset from traditional marketing: Social Media platforms are not another broadcasting channel, there must be a content and a network strategy that will require TIME to move connections towards action.
4. Social platforms are part of the information ecosystem and your products and services must be there too. You have to create a content strategy to answer “every question your customers could possibly have about your products, services, repairs, locations, benefits, and company in general.” Two questions leaders need to consider are: 1) What social media platforms should be in their “information ecosystem” and 2) What metrics would they use to determine if they are connecting to their customers in the right places.
5. Content is the Catalyst: “If the social web were a living organism, content would be the air that it breathes.” “You must have at least one source of original rich content and you have 3 viable options: a blog, a podcast and a video series.” “A source of rich content provides something that is shareable, conversational and engaging for social platforms.” This is a VAST topic and Mark has just finished writing a book about it: The Content Code. (can’t wait to read it!)

SECTION TWO. The 5 most difficult questions you’ll face:

1. What is the value of Social Media and how do we measure it? You’ll HAVE to read this one in its entirety as Mark explains how to “balance numbers against proper expectations” and gives examples of many unmeasurable QUALITATIVE benefits from the social web. You won’t want to miss the 25 benefits of having a company blog starting on page 56!
2. We’re in a niche market. Do we really need to use social media? Mark suggests to start by finishing this sentence: “Only we…” Find a way to differentiate yourself from your competitors! Then, look at whether you can incorporate Social Media into your existing Marketing strategy. If you STILL think you don’t need a presence on the social web, Mark gives you another 5 reasons to consider: SEO, Facebook is going nowhere for now, Social Proof, Perception (The Trade Show Dilemma) and the fact that Social Media IS the future of communications.
3. How much should we spend on Social Media Marketing? “It depends!”… on your GOALS and on the competitive structure of your industry. Mark outlines a model based on expense and awareness curves over time in traditional and social media based marketing and then suggests an integrated model that should help you understand how budgeting will have to be handled.
4. What to do about negative comments? Start from establishing a Social Media policy, get your Customer Service in order, listen and respond quickly following this plan: Acknowledge the comment, empathise, apologise, solve simple issues on the spot (empower your employees to do so) or take it offline to the phone or email and follow up.
5. We have limited resources. Where do we start? Focus on answering 5 key questions: 1) Finish your “Only we….” sentence. You can ask your customers. 2) Adjust your company culture. 3) MAKE yourself into a conversational brand. 4) Find a way to differentiate your brand from your competitors on Social Media. 5) Define your SOURCE of rich content.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars understood better how to market my brand, 30 Oct. 2014
I am a huge Mark W Shaefer fan and this book is 100% necessary for anyone curious in social media. It simply explains what the various social media platforms are and how you can use them, and why they will work for you.

Buy this, then buy The Tao of Twitter, then if you are that inspired purchase his next two books.

Since reading his books i have gained 250 followers on twitter in the space of two weeks, understood better how to market my brand, launched google + and Linked in and am reaping the benefits.

If you buy these books the same will happen to you.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Social Media for business explained concisely, 22 Mar. 2015
I absolutely love this book. Mark has really helped demistify using social media for business. It's concise and easy to understand. Recommended.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesnt go far enough, 6 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Social Media Explained: Untangling the World's Most Misunderstood Business Trend (Kindle Edition)
Agree with the reviewer that stated it should be called 'why Social Media'. Ultimately the book wasn't what I had hoped for and doesn't expand on the marketing options available to you. Also, and this is a minor point as it's the content that counts, but it looks as if it's been designed in Word. The layout and illustration is dreadful which does put you off. I'd assumed it was self published.
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