Customer Reviews


41 Reviews
5 star:
 (22)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-researched, evidence-based, highly recommended
I highly recommend this well-researched and evidence-based study of where UKIP came from, who is supporting them and why, as well as how far they may be able to go, particularly given the huge challenge posed to any new, insurgent party by the British `first past the post' electoral system. This is not a polemic. It's scholarly but it's definitely accessible to the...
Published 1 month ago by Christabelle

versus
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A thorough analysis with a fatal flaw
Ford and Goodwin have produced an extensive and detailed volume on the novel political phenomenon that is UKIP. The degree and depth of their analysis far exceeds anything which has gone before, and this three hundred page book, published in the spring of 2014, could justifiably be considered the definitive work on the rise of UKIP as an electoral force in the twenty...
Published 8 months ago by John Harvey


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A thorough analysis with a fatal flaw, 16 April 2014
By 
John Harvey (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ford and Goodwin have produced an extensive and detailed volume on the novel political phenomenon that is UKIP. The degree and depth of their analysis far exceeds anything which has gone before, and this three hundred page book, published in the spring of 2014, could justifiably be considered the definitive work on the rise of UKIP as an electoral force in the twenty years following its birth in 1993.

F & G are keen to identify the types of voters attracted to UKIP, and to this end they make extensive use of statistical analyses to identify the typical UKIP supporter. Their thorough research leads them to dismiss the simplistic journalistic stereotype of UKIP voters largely as disaffected middle class Tories. Yes such people exist in the Party hierarchy, and yes the Party founders may have been of this ilk, but UKIP today is also supported at the ballot box by a very different kind of voter. Those who now vote for Nigel Farage are, on average, lower down the social scale than supporters of any other political Party including Labour. They are the disaffected, the elderly and those hit by the hard economic times. They are the old traditional working class and those who feel their country is morphing into something unrecognizable from the one they grew up in - and is much the worse for all that. UKIP supporters may have started out as EU refuseniks but to this campaign they have added many other anti-establishment woes. Foremost amongst these has been mass immigration, which surged during the Blair years and has continued at a high level ever since. And since all three major parties have been in power for at least some of this period, this has allowed UKIP to exploit its electoral message of ‘a plague on all your houses’ to the whole Westminster establishment.

A major theme of ‘Revolt on the Right’ is that UKIP has achieved success unparalleled by any other new British political party in modern times. Even the SDP/Liberal Alliance of the early 1980s, with its own MPs in Westminster, failed to sustain its campaign for as long as UKIP has done. The authors could however have made a little more of the explosive growth from political obscurity in the 1960s and 70s of the SNP and Plaid Cymru. And the celtic nationalists’ motivating sentiment of “we don’t want to be governed from far-away Westminster” surely has echoes in “we don’t want to be governed from far-away Brussels”.

In Chapter 6, Ford and Goodwin turn their attention to how UKIP could gain MPs in the 2015 General Election. Based on their extensive analyses of the beliefs, motivations and social backgrounds of UKIP voters they seek to identify those Parliamentary seats which hold most promise for the Party. Where are the traditional working class concentrated, where the elderly, where those with low levels of education? They identify what they claim to be the ten top prospects. But this is where they go wrong, and this is what reduces an otherwise five-star review to just three stars. For in drawing up their list, F & G should also have considered the electoral pull of the other Parties in each of these ten seats, and it is surprising that they have not done so.

In 2015 Labour will be on the offensive. It will be bouncing back from its historic electoral lows of 2009 and 2010. It will be gaining votes not losing them. There have for instance been sixteen Parliamentary by-elections since 2011. UKIP’s vote share may have gone up in fifteen of these but, critically, so has Labour’s in twelve. The Tory and Lib Dem votes by contrast have gone down in fourteen and thirteen respectively. So what are the authors suggesting as UKIP’s top ten prospects? Eight seats which are currently held by Labour and two by the Tories!
Ford and Goodwin had correctly identified the social and demographic factors most likely to lead to UKIP success. However, Parliamentary constituencies with these distinctive features are not just confined to Labour areas. All three Parties hold constituencies with these characteristics, so why would UKIP want to make its job more difficult? The strongly repeating voting patterns from the by-elections summarised above strongly suggest that the seats most likely to produce UKIP victories in 2015 are those which are true to the F & G formula but which, in addition, are currently held by MPs of the waning Conservative and demoralised Lib Dem Parties, and not those of the ascendant Labour Party. UKIP strategists will no doubt be planning accordingly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-researched, evidence-based, highly recommended, 10 Nov 2014
I highly recommend this well-researched and evidence-based study of where UKIP came from, who is supporting them and why, as well as how far they may be able to go, particularly given the huge challenge posed to any new, insurgent party by the British `first past the post' electoral system. This is not a polemic. It's scholarly but it's definitely accessible to the general reader who is interested in politics and society. I felt that the authors very effectively concealed any personal feelings that they may have regarding UKIP and its rise. I found the book a little repetitive at times, but maybe this is an unfair criticism; it's a studious work that is at pains to be evidence-based, which maybe makes some repetition necessary.

The book, first published in March 2014, could already do with a little update, given that UKIP's support has since then again soared in the polls and they now have their first MP in Westminster, with quite likely a second to follow in the next couple of weeks.

One of the most interesting chapters, for me, was chapter 3, which looks at the social and political origins of this `revolt on the right'. The authors deal with the change, from around 1964 to the present, in the relative size of the middle class and the working class, leading mainstream political parties, both in the UK and elsewhere in Europe, to, on the whole, increasingly marginalise the traditional interests of the latter (strong state intervention to help those in need, redistribution, workers' rights, etc.), in favour of championing the concerns of the burgeoning and influential middle class (issues such as the environment, human rights, civil liberties and global social justice). In much of Europe, this had resulted in some of the left's traditional voters turning to the radical right from the 1980s onwards, but this, for the most part, did not happen in the UK until very recently, with a surge of support for UKIP, a group set up back in 1993 to campaign against European integration, and which only in the last few years seems to have discovered and tapped into this huge source of potential support (one of the ironies of course being that UKIP have no history of backing most of those policies which are in the economic interest of the working class, such as strong state intervention to help the less privileged, redistributive taxation, and so on, which leads Ford and Goodwin to make the very interesting observation that UKIP's working-class base is `conflicted'; its `head' is Labour, as this is where its economic interest lies, but its `heart' often lies with the social values of the Conservatives).

As an aside, it would have been helpful had Ford and Goodwin explained exactly what they were classifying as working and middle class, throughout the book and particularly in chapter 3. For example, they have a graph showing the decline of the working class since 1964, and it is stated that social class is measured using the Goldthorpe-Heath-5-category class schema, but I would have liked to know what jobs were being classified as working class and which as middle class. I struggle to believe that the size of the working class has declined in relation to that of the middle class to the extent that Ford and Goodwin claim, but of course this all depends on how you classify working and middle class. If you count only manual jobs as working class, which I think the authors maybe do, then yes, with de-industrialisation and the decline of manufacturing since the 1970s or 1980s, of course the size of the working class has declined drastically in relation to that of the middle class, but what if you were to classify say routine non-manual jobs (routine clerical work, call centre operators, etc.) as working class?

Having read this book, I feel better informed about UKIP and who is supporting them and why, although I cannot say that I was particularly surprised by any of its conclusions. If you're interested enough in the topic to be reading a review of the book, it's probably well worth your time reading the book itself. A lot of tables and graphs are included, so I don't know how well this book would work on the Kindle; I read the paperback version.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


42 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly yet very readable, 24 Mar 2014
I would urge readers to ignore the silly one star review above. This is a very balanced and nuanced view of the emergence of Ukip as a serious player within British politics. It traces the party from its emergence in the early Nineties to its current status as a serious player on the electoral scene that is riding high in the polls. Although based on detailed empirical social science research, using electoral data and surveys for example, the authors also seem to have talked to everyone that matters within Ukip itself. The book manages to be objective and scholarly but is also enlivened by some amusing anecdotes so it is far from 'dry' academic research. It also offers a powerful portrayal of the - normally working-class - voters who feel abandoned by the main parties and have become the bedrock of Ukip's support.

This is essential reading for anyone interested in the future of British politics.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No longer like the mythical town of Brigadoon, 19 Oct 2014
By 
P. J. Dunn "Peter Dunn" (Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
While it’s almost impossible to produce such a study without value judgements on the underpinning ideology and policies bring analysed somehow seeping through, this book makes pretty good stab at a dispassionate analysis of where UKIP votes have come from over time.
I love the analogy that up till now many had viewed the regular UKIP success in euro elections as: “like the mythical town of Brigadoon: it emerges from the mist for one day every five years, generates great excitement, but then fades from view again as soon as polling day passes”. However the authors make a convincing case that UKIP are now drawing not just on disaffected Conservative votes but a substantial disenchanted “left behind” blue collar vote that would previously have voted for Labour or even the BNP.
While many have seen this book’s statistical analysis as focusing too much on UKIP’s surprising mounting draw on blue collar Labour voters as a sort of wake up call to Labour that is somewhat unfair. The book also acknowledges the still significant UKIP draw on disenchanted Conservatives (while saying this maybe plateauing), its ability to gain from the collapse in BNP votes, and that they are also picking up votes from those who saw the Lib Dems as the plucky outsiders before they entered government.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars honest and hard working people who have been patronized at best and ignored at worst by an arrogant cynical political ..., 26 Aug 2014
By 
M. Boost "Boostie" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
...or how the Labour Party cynically abandoned its traditional working class supporters in search of middle class university educated voters.

This book clarifies why this Labour Party member has left the party. Worth reading to understand why many others have also.

It goes beyond the sneering medias view of UKIP supporters and shows a decent, honest and hard working people who have been patronized at best and ignored at worst by an arrogant cynical political class.
,
None of the "big three" come out well from this. Told in straightforward and readable prose backed up by figures.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars REvolt on the right, 19 Dec 2014
Revolt on the Right is both an analysis of the current electoral prospects of the UK Independence Party and a history of attempts to break the three party lock on British politics from the SDP onwards. Events might render the analysis of UKIP’s current state dated (indeed, it was published before the party gained two MPs in late 2014), but its narrative of fourth party insurgency, and its account of the obstacles which the UK electoral system places in the way of any new party, will remain an important historical account for a lot longer. The story is told with so many statistics and analytical tables that even the most hardcore number-cruncher will be satisfied, but these are easily glossed over if you’re more interested in following the political narrative.
Of UKIP itself: the history of the party is longer than I knew and it had its origins in an office at the London School of Economics. That a party seen by many as the home of disaffected conservatives should have arisen from an institution with a left-wing reputation was a surprise to me, though perhaps not to the authors of the book. They argue that the simple equation of UKIP with the political right is not just simplistic but wrong. The party, they argue – with a wealth of statistical back-up – finds most favour amongst those at the bottom of the economic ladder, traditionally the core vote of the left. These voters are “left behinds” (their recurrent phrase), and what they were left behind was the modern economy. Without a university education, and divorced from the social values which accompany it, they see their world disappearing at the hands of a political class which simply ignores them when it doesn’t write them off as bigots.
If the authors are correct in this, then the narrative that’s appeared in the press in the second half of 2014 – that UKIP will challenge in Labour dominated seats as well as coastal reports full of the retired – really is an option. May 2015 will be the test of that and if UKIP goes down heavily I suspect this book’s usefulness as anything but history is over. Until then – and after, if UKIP do well – it’s a fine political analysis.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Solid empirical approach but disappointingly avoiding an examination of the central ideologies involved, 15 Oct 2014
This book is resolutely empirical and boasts a vast catalogue of stats concerning the social profile of Ukip supporters in terms of social class, gender, age, ethnicity and so forth. The tone is academic and dispassionate, this is no polemic. However it is reasonable inference that the authors hail from the 'centre-left'.

I would have been interested to see this study fleshed out with a consideration of Ukip's ideology, something that the authors here largely eschew, although there are numerous references to social liberalism and social conservatism and its respective association with an educated middle class strata and a declining bloc of blue collar workers and pensioners.

So whilst these ideologies are cited, they are treated as largely unproblematic entities which don't warrant any further unpacking. So for instance in Ukip's genesis, the authors ignore Sked's original conception of euroskepticism as an unaligned liberal venture. Indeed euroskepticism at one time enjoyed significant currency on the Labour Left and trade union movement.

Ford and Goodwin continue to hammer out the salient fact of Ukip's association with the 'left behind' declining working class and how their views remain uncongenial to the middle class elite that now run the show. However this becomes repetitive and tautological in later chapters.

The authors fail to discuss Ukip's championing of 'New Right' themes and examine its free market 'libertarian' philosophy, except as a fleeting reference when they make note of the BNP's protectionism/collectivism. By failing to examine the 'vision thing', Ford and Goodwin reinforce the idea that politics and Ukip in particular is largely a reactive game, with supporters happy to take a free hit without sufficiently reflecting on just what they might be voting for. However I think this is often a valid viewpoint in itself, as voters tend towards surface level empiricist explanations, nervously sidestepping any more systemic insights and abstractions.

A good book for social science students with a bent for methodology and stats!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting and thorough, 15 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent book. A fair and balanced view. One could hardly expect anyone to have any sympathy for the B.N.P. The only negative is if you want analysis of U.K.I.P's meteoric rise which began in 2014 with the European Elections then you will need to find out if there will be an updated edition. The most detailed (for the non enthusiast, non academic, most tedious ) analysis is quarantined in the back 20 pages of Appendices. Well written and supported by much data. A sympathetic view of what progress U.K.I.P. were making. In the light of subsequent events showing a good deal of foresight of their potential for success. An author's rating between the book and the by election of Clacton as being the U.K.I.P. perfect storm proved well founded with their subsequent 60 % to the Conservatives 25%.The research conclusions in the book appear well founded.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars I found it a good read and certainly feel more educated with regards to ..., 2 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain (Extremism and Democracy) (Kindle Edition)
This is a book for anyone who is wondering just what the hell is going on out there in the murky world of politics, and needs it explaining in plain English. The highs and the lows are all part of the narrative, from the early days of UKIP right up to, though not including, the last council and European elections. I found it a good read and certainly feel more educated with regards to the changes in voter preferences.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential if you want to understand the rise in popularity of UKIP, 20 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain (Extremism and Democracy) (Kindle Edition)
A clear, thorough assessment of UKIP's history and their prospects.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews