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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow
Of all of Yes's albums this one has arguably has the best songs on it, I approached with caution after purchasing the recent Close To The Edge re-issue which was sonically a real let down, this album is totally the opposite, the Blu-ray contains one of the best sounding 5.1 mixes I have ever heard, the instruments burst from the mix, Chis Squire's Bass and Tony Kaye's...
Published 7 months ago by K. G. R. Carpenter

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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 5.1 is great! Stereo is poor!
The 5.1 mix is brilliant, but the stereo is not!

This album was never going to be the best candidate for 5.1 songs like "Your Move" and "A Venture" not bringing much to the table. Steve Howe's "Clap" is left in it's stereo state during 5.1 playback as five speakers all throwing out a solo acoustic guitar piece wouldn't really sound very...
Published 7 months ago by Jon Endtwistle


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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow, 22 April 2014
By 
K. G. R. Carpenter (England) - See all my reviews
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Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Yes Album (Blu-ray Audio)
Of all of Yes's albums this one has arguably has the best songs on it, I approached with caution after purchasing the recent Close To The Edge re-issue which was sonically a real let down, this album is totally the opposite, the Blu-ray contains one of the best sounding 5.1 mixes I have ever heard, the instruments burst from the mix, Chis Squire's Bass and Tony Kaye's Hammond are a sound to behold, Wilson has a really good quality recording to play with, Bruford's drumming is a revelation, the sound of the toms just blows you away, Howe's intricate overdubs reveal guitar lines that were not apparent previously in the mix, of course the vocals are peerless as you would expect.

You are likely to be familiar with the songs if you are a Yes fan, if you are new to the band, this is a classic album presented in stunning clarity by a band at an early peak in their career (there were others), the extras include a live version's of America and a cover of the Rascals 'It's Love' , these show the band evolving pre Wakeman.

The extended studio take of 'A Venture' featuring Kaye's piano on this often overlooked track is beautiful, I loved the original but the longer version is a real bonus.

A special mention has to given to 'Perpetual Change' the instrumental section and the way it has been mixed leave you open mouthed, all in all if my enthusiasm comes across it's because this re-issue adds to the original issue and is not only as good as you remember it but better, you can't ask for more than that really,
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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply Yes at their very best, 16 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Yes Album (Audio CD)
It often saddens me that this line-up of Yes were only around for this one album, I realise that this is an out-of-the-norm-view (most Yes fans prefering the key-work of Wakeman) but the music that is put down on this suberb album is out of this world.
To me this is one of the rougher Yes albums, the technology needed to create the progressive complexity of the music was a year of so down the line, but the fact that the band pushed the studio to the limit gives it the charm that other albums seem to lack. The result is a hardened and brash sound, no smooth egdes, Howe's guitars are scratchy, Squire's bass sounds like someone melodically scraping a nail along a saw, Bruford's drums having the complexity of the likes of Alex Acuna, but still with that vintage 70s sound.
Although this is possibly not as well recieved or liked as "Close To The Edge", probably because it does not have anything of epic proportions on it, this is still good enough to be classic and naive enough to be charming.
"Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Starship Trooper" are the two obvious choices for best songs, but there is also the ballardesq-come-bop-rock of "I've Seen All Good People", a classic by my recogning as well as the chilled out acoustic solo of "The Clap". This song must not be confused for an album filler, if the listener stops to listen to it fully then they will discover that it is quite good.
Although this album was released a full 10 years before I was born I still think that it is a landmark of both contemporary and popular music. If you only buy 1 Yes album buy this, you will not regret it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five stars and then some, 5 Jun 2010
By 
Edgar of Baddesley (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
Words fail me that people exist in this world who are capable of giving less than five stars to this album and the the one star travesty is such a negative "chip on the shoulder" statement that it should be ignored and deleted. The fact is that The Yes Album burst on to the rock scene like a supernova, taking rock in a whole new different and entirely original direction. The two previous albums are enjoyable in their own right but are lesser works. The arrival of Steve Howe ignited the touchpaper, both in terms of composition and guitar virtuosity. This music defies categorisation. It combines gorgeous rock riffs with jazz-like interludes and overlays, strong melodies, exciting time changes, soaring vocals and science fiction imagery. Instruments interweave and exchange in a fluid but disciplined manner, underpinned by Chris Squires distinctive fuzz bass and masterful drumming from Bill Bruford - together they form far more than just a rythm section. Every song on this album is a strong composition, there is no filler. More than that though, this is an album and the songs complement each other perfectly to create an extended listening experience that in my view is unsurpassed by anything in the rock world before or since. The sheer joy and virtuosity of the music making takes this to the very top of my all time listing and I never tire of listening to it. Neither do my teenage sons! The arrival of Rick Wakeman on subsequent albums Fragile and close To The Edge brought a significant change as he preferred to experiment with emerging synthesiser technology, whereas the excellent Tony Kaye stuck to the "purer" Hammond and piano sounds that contribute to the unique feel of The Yes Album. However if you like this buy Fragile and Close To The Edge with confidence as they are both five star classic albums in their own right. The remastering is superb on all these Yes works.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An underrated classic, 25 Jun 2007
By 
N. Mason (Taunton, Somerset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
The first two albums ('Yes' and 'Time and a Word') had both, in their own ways, been high quality albums although many of the tracks were cover versions. 'The Yes Album' seemed to jump Yes forward in so many ways it was almost like listening to a completely new band (only guitarist Steve Howe had joined in place of Peter Banks). What you have is, in my view, the best as well as the most accessible Yes album to date.

'Yours is No Disgrace ' has always been my favourite Yes track with its pounding riff powered by some excellent drumming from Bill Bruford. Chris Squire is no ordinary bass player and his playing on this track is quite superb. Tony Kaye's organ playing is quite understated but crucial to the overall sound of the track. Jon Anderson's vocals are clear (even if the meaning of the words isn't!!). However, in my view it is Steve Howe's guitar playing which makes the track excel. Besides his background work in the basic riff his soloing is first class with, really three short and very different solos which make this song. His solo acoustic effort 'The Clap' is next - quite a short version compared to some he played live at the time. 'Starship Trooper' is another major song which builds beautifully over 6 or 7 minutes with some excellent guitar and keyboard interplay. 'Your Move' and 'All Good People' show some class harmonising as well as a really good ear for a pop/rock tune. 'A Venture' is probably the weakest track on the album but 'Perpetual Change' is a song which is often forgotten in the context of some of their later work. Just sit back and have a careful listen to a band who are really finding their sound starting to fly.

This version of the album has a few extra tracks on it but the basis of the original album is what makes this such a top class piece of work. A great album.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Yes Album - their finest hour!, 19 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Yes Album (Audio CD)
Steve Howe - Guitar, Tony Kaye - Keyboards, Jon Anderson - Vocals, Chris Squire - Bass and Bill Bruford - drums is a classic Yes line up. Not a lengthy album (they weren't in those days) at 41 minutes, but there's no padding here. The opening track 'Yours is no disgrace' sets the scene - nine and a half minutes of guitar mastery fused with keyboards to produce scintillating high-energy 'progressive rock'. From the start Chris Squire's distinctive bass sound is really noticeable and this features throughout the album. Next up 'Clap' not the best song ever written but it does give Steve Howe the opportunity to do a solo and show off his acoustic guitar skills to a live audience - who lap it up. Ending what was the first side (in the days of vinyl when there were two sides to an album) 'Starship Trooper' - a classic which soars and glides cleverly between electric guitar and acoustic and back again. Jon Anderson's voice becomes part of the overall musical effect. The track finishes wish a long slow build (3 minutes) of guitars and keyboards climaxing in a great crescendo particularly from Steve Howe and Tony Kaye - this track would have been best as the last of the album because while the rest is still great it can't match this. 'I've seen all good people' One song in two parts. Starts off gently, nice harmonies, acoustic guitar, (listen carefully and you can hear a chorus of "give peace a chance") changes to electric abruptly after 3 minutes with Steve Howe and Chris Squire leading the way and Tony Kaye following with 'rocky' piano. 'Venture' The main instruments featured on this track are rock style piano and bass - an unusual combination. Jon Anderson's vocals shown to best effect on this track. Not one of the best tracks on the album but still satisfyingly pleasant. 'Perpetual change' opens with Steve Howe giving his guitar neck a damned good riffing (if there is such a thing). Things soon smooth off with gentle vocals and careful guitar picking. This is a pattern which is repeated to good effect culminating with the eventual finale which sees Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Tony Kaye and Jon Anderson taking turns to shine - and they do! I haven't mentioned Bill Bruford on drums. What can I say, although it's an integral part of the music I find it difficult to get excited about drums in a rock group, nevertheless faultless drumming throughout. If you want to know what all the fuss was about back in the early 70's check this album out!
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This really is very good!, 3 Feb 2003
By 
N. A. Osborne (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have had this album since 1980 and I dip into it regularly. Five of the six tracks (A Venture not included) are, without doubt, five of the best YES have ever produced. Everything sits so nicely together. The arrangements are beautifully crafted and the musicianship shines through, but remains accesible. A lot of later YES material could so easily lose the listener early on.
As an example of the best of seventies prog/art rock the tracks STARSHIP TROOPER and PERPETUAL CHANGE stand out and to my mind would be in a top ten of that genre. Steve Howe's guitar playing is outstanding and Brufords Jazz rock drumming inventive . Every time I listen to this album it always seems fresh and it puts me in a good mood. If you buy only one YES album then it must be this one. Go on!
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The turning point for Yes, 20 Jun 2003
By 
Touring Mars (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
'The Yes Album' is the first Yes album to feature a certain Steve Howe, and what a huge difference his addition to the band makes. Already a well-honed rock band, Yes still had plenty of potential to move forward, and that they most certainly did with this album. Still minus keyboard vituoso Rick Wakeman, the full 'classic' line-up was as yet incomplete, but the band were still on their way to greatest by this point.
The songs on this album are much more like the sort of stuff that you would come to expect from the band in later years. Jon Anderson had already started to fly off on major lyrical tangents by this stage, and his unique brand of quasi-sci-fi ramblings is quite evident, especially on 'Yours In No Disgrace' and 'Starship Trooper'. Not to be confused with the dodgy disco title of the same name, 'Starship Trooper' is a classic, and introduced the 'three-stage' song concept into their music. Starting with a fairly standard section, it proceeds into an impressive acoustic section that would not have been possible if not for the amazing guitar skills of Steve Howe. As the song reaches it's climax, the 'space-rock' concept takes over, and Howe comes into his own with a tour-de-force performance.
'The Clap' is a live solo piece by Howe which is truly stunning. On first listen, it sounds like atleast two guitarists are playing simultaneously, but having seen Howe perform this self-same track in the flesh, I can assure you it is not. This track above any other demonstrated that Yes had acquired a truly formidable talent. Amusingly, Howe originally titled the song simply 'Clap', but when released on vinyl it was accidentally renamed 'The Clap', and to this day it remains the only progressive rock song perceived to be about venereal disease. Luckily, it is an instrumental piece!
'I've Seen All Good People/Your Move' is probably the best known track on the album, and is a showcase for Jon Anderson's vocal ability. Starting off pretty ordinarily, the song transforms into a lively 'jam' that would be a crowdpleaser for years to come.
'A Venture' is a distinct (but welcome) oddity within the Yes back-catalogue, and is one of Jon Anderson's least perplexing lyrics. Centred around a plodding rhythm and Tony Kaye's piano, it is certainly unlike anything Yes did ever again, but is an enjoyable track nonetheless. Finally, 'Perpetual Change' is another favourite of the Yes live set (a live version appears on 'Yessongs') and is a curious mish-mash of styles, but sees each musician (especially Bill Bruford on drums) excel themselves to produce a genuine Yes classic.
The additional tracks are recent additions that you can live without, and I haven't been tempted to replace my original copy of the CD yet, but they certainly don't detract from the album in any way. A must-have for any prog rock collection.
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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE Masterpiece Of The 70's, 7 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Yes Album (Audio CD)
If The Beatles set all kinds of challenges for musical direction during the 60s, the album that set the bar for '70s progressive rock is without any shadow of doubt, the 'Yes Album'. All that was missing the day the album was launched was a star in the east, as the music and lyrics were penned in Heaven. Jon A and the band set a challenge that only absolutely fantastic releases could match. The band themselves managed it again with 'Close To The Edge','Relayer' and 'Going For The One'. Genesis, Pink Floyd and Renaissance managed to do it as well, but that's about it. The Yes Album is THE album of the '70s. From the opening bars of 'Yours Is No Disgrace', through the superb climax to 'Starship Trooper (Wurm)' to the culmination of the album with 'Perpetual Change' the other prog bands were collectively slapped in the face with a gauntlet. Follow this...if you dare! An essential part of any music lovers collection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ultimate version of The Yes Album, 24 May 2014
By 
R Raybould "richard17025" (Newport, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Yes Album (Audio CD)
This review is of the 2014 CD + DVD-A release remixed by Steven Wilson. I do not comment on the music other than to say that this is album is one of the true greats of rock - progressive or otherwise.
The box contains a cd remixed and with greater resolution than a standard cd and as such sounds good on a decent hi-fi system. The DVD-A disc is what this pack is all about though. There is a flat transfer hi res stereo original mix and new (S Wilson) mixes in both stereo and 5.1 surround, both also flat transfers. There is also a 5.1 dts mix. (I have yet to try this latter mix).
The original mix in this format sounds superb and it alone justifies the purchase of this pack. If you are a die hard Yes fan this is higher sound quality than anything hitherto released; if you are new to Yes why settle for a lower resolution?
The new (2014) Wilson stereo mix is my personal favourite thus far. Why? Because it seems a little less harsh without losing the fantastic dynamics of the music and it seems to separate the instruments rather better, for example Squire's bass on the opening track is just easier t follow.
The (2014) 5.1 Surround version is good but not really for me. The choice of what to put out of each speaker will of course be a matter of taste. To me having key parts of the lead vocal coming out of the rear speakers is just not natural. (you can call me old fashioned!).
So I highly recommend this on sound quality alone but would suggest sticking to the stereo versions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an absolute classic, 15 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Yes Album (Audio CD)
to my ears the best album yes ever made the band combined progressive and rockier styles on this gem. something which sadly faded away on later albums i always prefered tony kayes attacking style of keyboard playing to the...although technically better..more flowery style of rick wakemans playing. interested in getting a yes album for the first time?? well to me the yes album is the masterpiece
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