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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting subject
Ancient history has always been among my favourite subjects. I found the theories expounded here really interesting and very plausible. Well documented and researched.
Published 12 months ago by Robert Howard

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29 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Something smells...
When I first read this book, I was blown away. The authors put forward a good case and compared the similarities of the Megalithic Yard (MY) to other existing measurement systems (eg the current imperial system) and showed how values like the earth's circumference were integer numbers in the megalithic system.
However, a couple of things really annoyed me about this...
Published on 29 Jun 2005


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting subject, 15 Aug 2013
By 
Robert Howard "Potty Bob" (Spain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Civilization One (Paperback)
Ancient history has always been among my favourite subjects. I found the theories expounded here really interesting and very plausible. Well documented and researched.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting and worth a read, 31 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Civilization One (Paperback)
This book is very interesting because it presents an array of mathamatical calculations that are based on what has been surveyed at archaeological sites. The maths can be verified throughout, although it must be accepted that many of the "findings" are the assumptions of the authors - what some reviewers have scorned and criticised as nonsensical convoluted thought. But let us be absolutely straight here, the authors are creative and imaginative and what they present is valid if perhaps overly imaginative at times.

The Megalithic Yard and the Minoan Foot are demonstrated, as a matter of fact, to be superior for all convenient terrestrial and celestial calculations (Relative for Sun, Moon and Earth - but not the planets!) and this is to be admired. The authors are intelligent and supply the reader with a wealth of genuinely fascinating and sometimes bewildering information. The accuracy of their findings from the archaeological point of view are highly debateable, but from the theoretical point of view, what they present is valuable and more than a little interesting.

To sum up, it really doesn't matter if the content of this book has any basis in fact or if it is the pure invention and wishful thinknig of the authors because the information is so useful and enlightening. A truly fantastic read which persuaded me to purchase "Who Made the Moon" by the same authors(I'm awaiting its arrival at the time of this review). From reading the reviews of that book I already know that I shall certainly not agree with the conclusions that the authors present but -just like with this gem of a book - I shall enjoy the "facts" along the way and draw my own conclusions as a result. That is what you can do as well with these thought provoking and thoroughly stimulating books.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Interesting, 8 Nov 2013
By 
GH Norris (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Civilization One (Paperback)
There are a lot of numbers here but it is easy to follow and I never know measurement systems could be so interesting. This really makes you think about the possibilities of information surviving a lost civilization in the distant past.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Serious thoughts, 21 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Civilization One (Paperback)
Absolutely fascinating reading.
Pooh poohs a lot of the old myths.
Have spread the word by giving talks based on it.
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29 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Something smells..., 29 Jun 2005
By A Customer
When I first read this book, I was blown away. The authors put forward a good case and compared the similarities of the Megalithic Yard (MY) to other existing measurement systems (eg the current imperial system) and showed how values like the earth's circumference were integer numbers in the megalithic system.
However, a couple of things really annoyed me about this book. The author tried to make it like a thriller, so there are lots of 'exciting' 'phone conversations. Secondly, the conclusions they draw are too broad and the final third of the book (the bit with Jefferson and megalithic music) is dreadful, awful speculation.
The authors of this book claim to be 'outside' the establishment and believe their findings to be ignored because they would fundamentally change how we think about megalithic man. Their conclusion is that 'Magi', 'Watchers' or an advanced civilaization taught the Sumerians/British megalithic men how to work out measurements etc. I believed them and their credible evidence, until I read that they were both Masons. Knight is a Mason, Butler has written on the Templars and probably is also a Mason. Did Prince Michael of Kent pay them to write this?
Worth reading from a library if you are interested in wacky theories or stone circles. But I am warning you, the writing style grates and the conclusion really stinks!
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13 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book of the Century, 16 Dec 2004
I've just read this book twice. There are no words that can convey the stupefaction, amazement and wonderment that this book caused in me. I'll try to, however, but the truth is far beyond. Fantastically brilliant! What Alan Butler and Christopher Knight have done is a powerful achievement. It is by far the best book I have ever read and I would be surprised if there will ever be one that could surpass it. I am quite convinced there won't be any, because what they did is incredible enough.
The demonstration is brilliant and touches the sublime. Even better than Butler's `The Bronze Age Computer Disc', published 5 years ago.
Easy to read, easy verifiable calculations, the origin of geometry imposes itself as an evidence which is doubly startling: first, everything is integrated within a system which, incredibly, is thousands of years old; second, the book unambiguously shows that the very laws of our part of the universe are very hard to explain without a `Great Architect'.... unless anyone has a better explanation?? The two authors just show the existence of some 'Great Underlying Principle.' Both of these facts are breathtaking.
For the numbers 366, 10 and 40 are just omnipresent in calendars, time, planet dimensions, units of length and weights!
The subtitle of the book is not exaggerated: this book shows that the world is not as you thought it was, and it will change your life forever!
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22 of 34 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Badly written speculation, 15 Dec 2004
Rubbish. Built on supposition after supposition which are, in later chapters, taken as fact. The writing dithers around while it tries to find a conclusion. It is incredibly long-winded and has nothing to say in the first place. One gets the impression that the authors came up with an idea and tried to push and pull their "arguments" to fit into it.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Twist on History, 18 May 2011
This review is from: Civilization One (Paperback)
A good book that offers some hard to refute evidence on the suggestion of an out side inteligence helping man on his way. The math at times is a bit hard to follow but even I get the jist of what the theory is suggesting. Very much worth reading between pulp fiction books and for a coffee table it is ideal as a lazy Sunday read.
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking, 7 Oct 2004
By A Customer
This is a remarkable book which takes Professor Alexander Thom's work on the megalithic yard stages further. It's an easy read and I wasn't daunted by the calculations which bear out the findings. It makes me think that history needs to be reviewed and the knowledge of our predecessors given the credit it deserves.
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8 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Our mysterious ancestors, 18 July 2005
By 
Pieter Uys "Toypom" (Johannesburg) - See all my reviews
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This fascinating book of alternative history examines the evidence of weights and measures and comes to the conclusion that there must have been an advanced culture in prehistory. The structures of the Stone Age were built by using a very precise unit of measurement, called the megalithic yard. The book explores the science behind prehistoric units, their mathematical origin and means of reproduction, and proves that these are linked to the dimensions of the solar system.
The reader must have a basic knowledge of arithmetic but overall the book is an easy read and very revealing. Amongst the topics discussed are writing, Egypt, Sumeria, the Minoan foot, solar and sidereal days, pendulums and the importance of the planet Venus. It turns out that the British Pound and Pint are both derived from ancient measurements. The units of the hour, minute and second were developed more than 4000 years ago, from the movements of the moon.
The text also encompasses subjects like the harmony of the spheres, Sumerian degrees and the calendar, and explains that the metric system is not a recent invention. There is a section on Thomas Jefferson and his achievements; this great man apparently realized that he was rediscovering parts of a very ancient system.
Amongst the most captivating sections is the chapter on music and light. There is a definite correspondence between the rotating mass of our planet and human music. Also, megalithic mathematics produces its own musical structure. The authors conclude that there must have been an advanced people who instructed the rest of the world in science and technology. They also refer to the Masonic concept of the Great Architect of the Universe.
There are seven appendices that include further information on earth days and the megalithic year, megalithic music, the Phaistos Disc, the amazing barley seed, and the connection between megalithic principles and Freemasonry. The colour plates include approximately 20 full colour photographs and there are many black and white illustrations throughout the text. The book concludes with an index.
I also recommend Lost Civilisations Of The Stone Age by Richard Rudgley, Stone Age Soundtracks by Paul Devereux, and Forbidden Archaeology by Michael Cremo and Richard Thompson.
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