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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it, devour it, digest it . . . enjoy!
When you buy the first book in a series and then the second and read both of them within 5 days and then look impatiently for the third, then you know it's a good read!

They say these are like Patrick O'Brien's books . . . I don't know, I have 3 of those staring down at me as I type this and I haven't got past page 100 in the first book, I find them so hard...
Published 12 months ago by SteveR

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3.0 out of 5 stars more old school fun
The second in the trilogy featuring Max Robichaux, in an old school space war-fare romp. The downsides to the previous novel still exist, no women and a distinct lack of technological improvement, it still remains fun. Max is a young commander and slightly more brilliant as a tactician than he should be and he does like to give an inspirational speech or provide wise...
Published 22 days ago by Nick Brett


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it, devour it, digest it . . . enjoy!, 26 July 2014
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When you buy the first book in a series and then the second and read both of them within 5 days and then look impatiently for the third, then you know it's a good read!

They say these are like Patrick O'Brien's books . . . I don't know, I have 3 of those staring down at me as I type this and I haven't got past page 100 in the first book, I find them so hard going . . .

Anyway back to the book, plots and sub-plots are interwoven, we learn more about Max and his flaws and a bit more about Bram the doc, but not a lot more. We also learn a bit more about the other main characters and are introduced to some more and their characters.

It's good for once that the "alien" cultures often have superior technology and Honsinger has done well in weaving them into the story, ensuring that a one size doesn't fit all and they retain their distinctive cultures as do other human factions.

As usual I'm not trying to spoil the story - read and devour, digest at leisure - 500 pages for £1 - what a bargain promo Amazon! - even £3 wouldn't be too much.

The only think I would suggest is that a story this long could be split into 2 parts and the ending . . . for a while I thought it should be at the start of book , but I'm still confused about the best presentation . . . perhaps a part 3 and some extra filler to link it to part 2?

Anyway can we have the next book please and can you get started with the new series?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly detailed., 4 Aug. 2013
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What I loved about this book was all the little details that could be found by careful re-reading. It felt like a Navy that had been around for centuries with all it's traditions and quirks. It actually felt real to me unlike practically all the fleet structures that you see in Scifi books. Things like the Midshipman Easter egg hunt and the nicknames for specific members of the crew.
The characters themselves were (in my opinion) likeable and beliveable especially the doctor. The action scenes were also enjoyable and the tactics Beliveable.
What I loved most about this book however was the Vaaach. No spoilers just read the books and find out. Well the Vaaach and Horneymeyer.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy homage., 1 Oct. 2013
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A. Anderson (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I so enjoyed the jack Aubrey novels that this sci fi version is fascinating. While the introduction of nuclear weapons is a little concerning - how does anyone live long enough to develop their "naval" society and culture? The balance of battle versus organisation of the ship and crew is excellent. Always a great pace. Wish there were more novels in the series
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars as good as the first, 24 Jun. 2013
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The only problem in the book is that it has to end, can't wait for the next.

Thanks for the stories Paul, don't like facebook so can't comment there but hopefuly you will read this, take a look at Admiral Cohrane - the greatest sailor ever, grand admiral of three countries, defeated more French ships, and possibly more adversary ships than any sailor in history - made Nelson look like he was slacking and tied down more enemy (French) soldiers than any other other force of its size. A superb tactician and startegists and litle is written or generally known about him. And you thought John Paul Jones could fight!!!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars More space opera parody?, 21 Nov. 2014
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JPS - See all my reviews
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This is Book 2 of the Man of War, an enjoyable military space opera romp that takes place during the 24th century and leads like a parody of the genre.

It includes very much the same ingredients as the first volume, with the two main characters and their behaviours, Lieutenant Commander Max Robichaux and Dr Sahin, being very largely inspired by Patrick O'Brian's duo (Captain Aubrey/Doctor Maturin).
Again, this volume contains a rather high number of clichés or caricatures but there is also a large dose of "politically correctness".

You get the cowardly, bureaucratic and incompetent superior who tries to (but of course does not succeed in) bully our Robichaux-action man and hero who will, of course, save his life, his ship and his whole crew for him. You also get a piece on "friendly Muslims" (beginning with Dr Sahin - the hero's best friend) from an association of planets similar to the United Emirates with one of their leading houses being called the House of Saoud. They will, of course, need help from our hero will, of course, provide very successfully.

Again, the book is action-packed, with the whole story taking place during a month and a half this time (slightly longer than in the first book). During this short period, Max Robichaux and his friend, ship and crew seem to spend their time racing around the galaxy, blowing to bits enemy ships bigger than theirs and winning against impossible odds.

There are a number of additional features in this episode.

You get to learn more of the Vaagh, huge and hugely advanced four meter high fierce predators that look like koala bears. They present themselves as "honourable hunters" and one of their warlords, amid lots of fierce growling, seems to be increasingly sympathetic to the "primate fruit eaters" (a derogatory term for humans) in general, and Super Robichaux in particular.

You also get to learn more about the Kargs - archenemies of humankind and bent on its extinction. They look like humanoid rats which, when seeing that the tide of the war is somewhat turning against them, come up with a supposedly devious and tempting "peace proposal" for the war-weary humans, except that said proposal is nothing sort of unconditional surrender. This allows the author to build up layers upon layers of somewhat phoney and artificial drama. At least for me, the humans' answer which, of course, is brought back to the Krags by Robicheaux and his little destroyer, is a rather obvious one, especially since we still have volume three coming up.

I was also rather amused by the character of Admiral Hornmeyer (a loose adaptation of Hornblower perhaps?), Robichaux's tough, swearing and no nonsense flag officer, getting all excited with one of his brand new toys - a brand new warship with extraordinary specifications and performances. He already make can appearance in volume 1 but you take quite a bit more of his gruff behaviour in this one.

All in all, and like episode one, you might end up "hating" this book if you make the mistake of taking its contents seriously. If you manage to get past the first degree and reach out for the second or even the third ones, then you might find the book entertaining, perhaps even exciting at times, and have a few good laughs. This was my case, and while I may not exactly be waiting for episode three with baited breath, contrary to other reviewers, I am quite sure I will enjoy it as well if it turns out to be more of the same. Four stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great follow on and perfectly complements the first book, 29 July 2014
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Book 2 in the series and I can't wait for the next one. This is a great follow on and perfectly complements the first book. The plot thickens, the bad guys are extra bad and there is intrigue and nail biting decisions to be made by everyone. A fantastic space opera, lots of exploding ships, heroic deeds, incompetent leaders and swash buckling adventure.
That sounds a bit shallow but in reality the book draws on real history, naval battles and manoeuvres from both world wars etc. So is really captivating. Read it.... It's good
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Star Trek but.... really good !, 23 July 2014
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Mr. J. Kelsey "Gadegetty Guy" (Dorset UK) - See all my reviews
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I very much enjoy reading sci-fi, especially reading S.T. novels.... and the "Man of War" series, although very much different to S.T., was enthralling to read......... the detail towards being "science factual" was welcome and I particualrly like the way it provides detail on "tactical" space combat, considering no actual space combat has yet to occur in reality!!.... thank god!
.... so, I look forward to further reading in this series as it seems highly likely there will be more...fingers crossed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome, 8 Feb. 2014
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One word awesome is all you need for this book. Loved the detail the history the battle scenes. The humour made me laugh and even a few tears. AWESOME!!! More please
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent., 17 Oct. 2013
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Excellent follow up to the first book.
Some of the best military sci-fi out there.
No information yet on when number three will be available?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great stuff, 19 May 2013
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Kindle Customer (Cyberspace of course) - See all my reviews
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Book 2 of what looks to be an interesting series - Captain Aubrey / Hornblower in Space. The authors have succeeded in blending the styles and science and have created something of their own. Sometimes the overlong science descriptions are wearing - did Captain Kirk ever explain how a phaser worked - no he just shot the bad guy.

It's very enjoyable though! I shall be buying book 3 when it's ready!
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