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172 of 197 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brief Summary and Review
The main argument: The unequal distribution of wealth in the developed world has become a significant issue in recent years. Indeed, the data indicate that in the past 30 years the incomes of the wealthiest have surged into the stratosphere (and the higher up in the income hierarchy one is, the greater the increase has been), while the incomes of the large majority have...
Published 7 months ago by A. D. Thibeault

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186 of 220 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Correct about inequality but poor economics
Thomas Picketty offers the disclaimer that his book is ‘as much a work of history as of economics’ (p33) which he then goes on to prove. He introduces his 2 core economic equations and asks readers not well versed in mathematics not to immediately close the book. It is in fact readers who are well versed in mathematics who might well close the book, since his...
Published 5 months ago by Geoff Crocker


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172 of 197 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brief Summary and Review, 26 Mar 2014
The main argument: The unequal distribution of wealth in the developed world has become a significant issue in recent years. Indeed, the data indicate that in the past 30 years the incomes of the wealthiest have surged into the stratosphere (and the higher up in the income hierarchy one is, the greater the increase has been), while the incomes of the large majority have stagnated. This has led to a level of inequality in wealth in the developed world not seen since the eve of the Great Depression. This much is without dispute.

Where there is dispute is in trying to explain just why the rise in inequality has taken place (and whether, and to what degree, it will continue in the future); and, even more importantly, whether it is justified. These questions are not merely academic, for the way in which we answer them informs public debate as well as policy measures--and also influences more violent reactions. Indeed, we need look no further than the recent Occupy Movement to see that the issue of increasing inequality is not only pressing, but potentially incendiary.

Given the import and the polarizing nature of the issue of inequality, it is all the more crucial that we begin by way of shedding as much light on the situation as possible. This is the impetus behind Thomas Piketty's new book Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

One of Piketty's main concerns in the book is to put the issue of inequality in its broader historical context. Specifically, the author traces how inequality has evolved from the agrarian societies of the 18th and early 19th centuries; through the Industrial Revolution and up to the First World War; throughout the interwar years; and into the second half of the twentieth century (and up to the first part of the twenty-first).

With this broad historical context we are able to see much more clearly the causes of inequality. As we might expect, what we find is that inequality is influenced by a host of societal factors--including economic, political, social and cultural factors. However, what we also find is that inequality is influenced by a broader set of factors associated with how capital works in capitalist societies (and market economies more generally).

Specifically, we find that capital (and the wealth it generates) tends to accumulate faster than the rate of economic growth in capitalist societies. What this means is that capital tends to become an increasingly prevalent and influential factor in these societies (at least up to a point). What's more, wealth not only tends to accumulate, but to become more and more concentrated at the top (mainly because those with more capital are able to earn a higher rate of return on their capital investments). For these reasons, capitalism on its own tends to produce a relatively high degree of inequality.

The natural tendency of capital to accumulate and to become ever more concentrated largely explains the high degree of inequality that was witnessed in the developed world in the early part of the twentieth century. This inequality was largely dashed, however, in the interwar years. The reason for this is that the major events of the first half of the twentieth century (including the two world wars, and the Great Depression) thwarted capital's natural tendency to accumulate, and also destroyed large stocks of wealth. The end result was that by the time World War II was over, inequality in the developed world had reached an all-time low.

After the Second World War, the natural tendency of capital to accumulate resumed. However, various political and economic measures (including progressive taxation, rent control, increasing minimum wages, and expanded social programs) worked to redistribute this growing capital, thus preventing inequality from growing as quickly as it would have otherwise.

In the 1980s, though, the developed countries did an about-face, and began eliminating many of the measures that had prevented inequality from rising according to its natural tendency. The consequence was that inequality reasserted itself in a major way, such that it is nearly as extreme today as it was on the run up to the Great Depression. Furthermore, the historical evidence indicates that capital will likely continue to accumulate and become ever more concentrated, such that we will witness an even greater level of inequality moving forward.

As far as justifying the growing inequality that we are currently seeing, Piketty raises serious doubts as to whether it may rightly be considered fair. What's more, as inequality continues to grow, it is increasingly likely that large parts of the population will also come to see it as unfair and unjustified--thereby increasing the likelihood of political opposition.

For Piketty, the best and fairest solution to these problems would be to steepen the progressive taxation applied to the wealthiest individuals. The problem, though, is that in a world of financial globalization (where there is a high degree of competition for capital--as witnessed by tax havens), it is extremely difficult to apply the appropriate tax scheme without the cooperation and coordinated efforts of the international community--and this is simply not something that is easy to achieve.

The alternative, however, is much more troubling for it is likely that it will involve reverting to protectionism and nationalism--and this is really in no one's interest.

This book is an absolute tour-de-force. The broad time-frame that Piketty explores, and the enormous body of data that he brings together, makes this study extremely comprehensive (no one will even think of accusing Piketty of cherry picking the data). Also, the reader is struck by how dispassionately Piketty analyzes the evidence he brings to the table. Indeed, while the author does have a position on inequality, one never receives the impression that this is corrupting his analysis (I consider myself to be a pragmatist politically, and often find that writers on both the left and the right massage the truth, but that was never the case here). Finally, it should be said that the book is very long, and just as dense, with the author often delving into extreme detail, so be prepared for a challenge. A must read for anyone with a serious interest in economics.
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186 of 220 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Correct about inequality but poor economics, 12 May 2014
By 
Geoff Crocker (Bristol UK) - See all my reviews
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Thomas Picketty offers the disclaimer that his book is ‘as much a work of history as of economics’ (p33) which he then goes on to prove. He introduces his 2 core economic equations and asks readers not well versed in mathematics not to immediately close the book. It is in fact readers who are well versed in mathematics who might well close the book, since his equations make no sense and cannot bear the weight of interpretation he places on them throughout the book. They are core to his argument, but they fail. He nowhere derives them, proves them, or empirically tests them. He merely states them.

According to Picketty, the ‘first fundamental law of capitalism’ (p52) is that α=rxβ where α is the share of capital in national income, r is the rate of return on capital, and β is Picketty’s capital/income ratio. This is a simple identity, is no more than telling us that a/b x b = a. Picketty admits this identity and tautology but nevertheless insists that this is the ‘first fundamental law of capitalism’, a claim he simply cannot justify. His ‘second fundamental law of capitalism’ (p166) is that β=s/g where s is the savings rate and g the growth rate. His example claims that a savings rate of 12% and a growth rate of 2% give a capital/income ratio of 600%. This is simply untrue. A simple spreadsheet taking 100 units of GDP growing in row 1 at 2%/year, showing 12% saving of that GDP in row 2, cumulating that in row 3 and dividing the result by row 1 to give Picketty’s capital/income ratio in row 4, shows that it becomes 600% only in year 199. Not only does this ‘fundamental law’ take so long to be true, as Picketty admits, but it is only true in that year and thereafter continues to grow, contrary to his claim that it reaches a long term equilibrium. His third equation is his claim that r>g drives capital accumulation. r and g are however measures in different units, r is a scalar ratio, whereas g is a first differential over time. Equations and inequalities require variables on each side to be in the same units. Picketty’s comparison of the return to capital and the growth rate are like comparing one person’s height to another person’s weight. His model is bogus.

He then conflates capital and wealth (‘I use the words ‘capital’ and ‘wealth’ interchangeably’ (p47)). This obscures more than it elucidates. Capital traditionally defined in economics is the means of production. It is an input to the economic process. Wealth by contrast is an output. We might very well care differently about how much capital and wealth we have, and who owns them. More effective capital may drive up output, whilst more wealth has no creative function and attracts a moral question. Picketty is wrong, analytically and morally, to confuse the two in one measure.

Picketty is disparaging in very short measure of Marx (p227-230), Keynes (p220), mathematical economics (p32), and economists generally (p296, 437, 514, 573, 574). Only Picketty has it right (p232). He quotes Jane Austen and Honoré de Balzac, more than he does either Marx or Keynes. His book is unnecessarily long and a tedious read, due to its rambling repetitive style. It could have been far more concise.

His main point is however well taken. Ownership of wealth has become increasingly unequal. His remedy is a global progressive tax on capital. By this he means all capital. But he doesn’t say what effect a progressive tax on each form of capital would have, how it would be paid, and what should be done with the payment. Would companies owning productive assets have to hand factories to the state? Or to the poor? Would house owners have to sell their houses, or shareholders their shares, in which case would their price be sustained? Or is he assuming asset owners also have income to pay the capital tax, in which case it becomes an income tax? And what’s the point? The purpose Picketty tells us on page 518 is ‘to regulate capitalism’ and thereby to ‘avoid crises’. But he doesn’t tell us how capitalism would be thereby made more acceptable or how crises would be avoided. He also admits it will never happen!

Whilst I agree with Picketty that extremes of income and wealth are morally repugnant, my complaint is that i) he should do more to investigate and attack the processes which allow this outcome, for example regulating the software market more effectively to avoid Bill Gates becoming obscenely wealthy based on Microsoft’s extreme and unjustified monopoly rate of profit, whilst also regulating natural resource markets to avoid billionaire build up there, ii) this is not in fact the major issue facing capitalism today. Far more important is the lack of effective macroeconomic demand and the fall in real wages caused by the high productivity of automation technology. For this a citizen’s income funded by QE (ie without being added to government debt) is the only and the urgently needed solution. Maybe we could compromise and use the proceeds of Picketty’s capital tax to fund a world citizen income. He clearly has a very good PR machine promoting his book – see the low votes attached to any critical review on Amazon, a fate very likely to meet this review!

Geoff Crocker
Author ‘A Managerial Philosophy of Technology : Technology and Humanity in Symbiosis’
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ground breaking, but why wasn't it published 50+ years ago? Economics is a spivvy subject ..., 21 Sep 2014
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Mr. C. G. R. Wells (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Kindle Edition)
Unbelievable that this book was not written 50+ years ago. Whatever your view on Piketty's conclusions, this book presents the most complete data set on wealth accumulation, and opens up the debate. What sort of society do you want to live in? one dominated by the 0.1%? or one in which everyone has the opportunity to contribute and thrive? Picketty ultimately seems to suggest a wealth-tax to prevent wealth inequality from spiralling out of control, but in practice, this would be difficult to achieve without powerful global institutions, and it seems that the political will is lacking ...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Serious economic work based on exhaustive research and a long period of trend observation, 8 April 2014
By 
Denis Vukosav - See all my reviews
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‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ written by Thomas Piketty who is a Professor at the Paris School of Economics is a well-made evaluation of trends in the world economy until the 21st century. This is a translation of a book that was last year originally published in French, which I read on the original, but in English is much more understandable and therefore more accessible to a wider group of readers what with its quality certainly deserves.

The Piketty’s book is quite extensive, so take some solid amount of time for its nearly 700 pages that will definitely not disappoint you, but do not expect to read them as some light novel. ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ is divided into four major units – ‘Income and Capital’, ‘The Dynamics of the Capital/Income Ratio’, ‘The Structure of Inequality’ and ‘Regulating Capital in the Twenty-First century’- and as good add-on that is for such a book mandatory supplement, the author at the end of the text added Index, his notes, contents in detail and list of book tables and illustrations.

At the very beginning Thomas Piketty raises significant questions which answer why he decided to write his book – “…But what do we really know about the distribution of wealth over the long term? Do the dynamics of private capital accumulation inevitably lead to the concentration of wealth in ever fewer hands, as Karl Marx believed in the nineteenth century? Or do the balancing forces of growth, competition, and technological progress lead in later stages of development to reduced inequality and greater harmony among the classes, as Simon Kuznets thought in the twentieth century? What do we really know… and what lessons can we derive from that knowledge for the century now under way?”

The author sincerely admits that his answers are not perfect and fully complete, but they are based on much more extensive historical and comparative research than were available to economists and researchers, covering three centuries and numerous countries, starting from the United States, providing a new framework that enables a better understanding of economy hidden mechanisms.

And although it might seem that this book is intended only to economic experts, due to its informativeness and clarity, ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ will intrigue also general audience interested in economic developments and long term distribution of income and wealth.

After reading Piketty’s book the reader will, however, be clear that the author comes from Europe because his views are quite different from the American conservative ones, but we must not forget that a work based on such amount of data and the long period of trend observation no one has written before.

Therefore ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ can certainly be considered credible and recommendable to read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars xtr, 13 Sep 2014
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Be forewarned, this is not an easy read. I have a basic understanding in economics and found aspects of this book hard. But the general argument is there and for the mathematical areas Piketty does put them into English (or translated English).

Insightful and analytical, this may be the work of our time. We can only hope governments take heed of this advice
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4.0 out of 5 stars Some great information, but nothing revolutionary, 11 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Kindle Edition)
Review courtesy of www.subtleillumination.com

It's a long book, so just some brief thoughts for those considering it:

-Overall very good: lots of interesting information on wealth and income inequality.
-Before world wars, inequality was from wealth inequality; now, it comes from income inequality. Rise of the supermanager.
-Policy analysis weak – hasn’t really considered other options or read the literature. Still, capital tax may be good idea: can replace the common and unfair real estate tax. WIsh he had discussed a consumption tax.
-Long run, the only cure to inequality is better education.
-No big surprises: basically just fleshes out ideas that most people would have believed true intuitively, if without data.
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63 of 81 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Economics of Inequality, 17 Mar 2014
By 
Charles - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Kindle Edition)
Inequality is a sensitive subject with extreme views on both sides of the argument, but what do we really know about how wealth and inequality comes about and what can we do to fix the problem? Unfortunately economics has a bad reputation for "abundance of prejudice and a paucity of fact" as the author puts it. This is especially bad when you take in to account politicians rely on economists to tell them how to run the country. This book tries to address the problem by using actual data like tax returns to try and get to the heart of the problem.

A major point is that inequality is increasing and has been for a long time, the decline in inequality in the 20 century was a result of the shock to society of two world wars (e.g destruction of property, inflation, bankruptcy)

"In fact, all the historical data at our disposal today indicate that it was not until the second half-- or even the final third-- of the nineteenth century that a significant rise in the purchasing power of wages occurred. From the first to the sixth decade of the nineteenth century, workers' wages stagnated at very low levels-- close or even inferior to the levels of the eighteenth and previous centuries."

"This long phase of wage stagnation, which we observe in Britain as well as France, stands out all the more because economic growth was accelerating in this period. The capital share of national income-- industrial profits, land rents, and building rents --insofar as can be estimated with the imperfect sources available today, increased considerably in both countries in the first half of the nineteenth century."

"It would decrease slightly in the final decades of the nineteenth century, as wages partly caught up with growth. The data we have assembled nevertheless reveal no structural decrease in inequality prior to World War I. What we see in the period 1870- 1914 is at best a stabilization of inequality at an extremely high level, and in certain respects an endless inegalitarian spiral, marked in particular by increasing concentration of wealth. It is quite difficult to say where this trajectory would have led without the major economic and political shocks initiated by the war. With the aid of historical analysis and a little perspective, we can now see those shocks as the only forces since the Industrial Revolution powerful enough to reduce inequality."

"In any case, capital prospered in the 1840s and industrial profits grew, while labour incomes stagnated. This was obvious to everyone, even though in those days aggregate national statistics did not yet exist. It was in this context that the first communist and socialist movements developed. The central argument was simple: What was the good of industrial development, what was the good of all the technological innovations, toil, and population movements if, after half a century of industrial growth, the condition of the masses was still just as miserable as before, and all lawmakers could do was prohibit factory labour by children under the age of eight? The bankruptcy of the existing economic and political system seemed obvious. People therefore wondered about its long-term evolution: what could one say about it?"

Karl Marx's prediction of an apocalyptic end to capitalism was based on the tendency for capital to accumulate and become concentrated in ever fewer hands, with no natural limit to the process. "either the rate of return on capital would steadily diminish (thereby killing the engine of accumulation and leading to violent conflict among capitalists), or capital's share of national income would increase indefinitely (which sooner or later would unite the workers in revolt). In either case, no stable socioeconomic or political equilibrium was possible."

But Marx's apocalypse did not happen "In the last third of the nineteenth century, wages finally began to increase: the improvement in the purchasing power of workers spread everywhere, and this changed the situation radically, even if extreme inequalities persisted and in some respects continued to increase until World War I. The communist revolution did indeed take place, but in the most backward country in Europe, Russia, where the Industrial Revolution had scarcely begun, whereas the most advanced European countries explored other, social democratic avenues-- fortunately for their citizens. Like his predecessors, Marx totally neglected the possibility of durable technological progress, steadily increasing productivity and diffusion of knowledge, which is a force that can to some extent serve as a counterweight to the process of accumulation and concentration of private capital."

The next major point is when the return rate on capital exceeds the rate of growth of output and income ( as it did in the nineteenth century and seems quite likely to do again in the twenty-first) it means that people that own capital profit more than people that sell their labour thus inequality rises between owners of capital and people that rely on labour to earn a living.

The wars also effected inheritance. Individuals who should have inherited fortunes in 1950- 1960 did not inherit much because their parents had not had time to recover from the shocks of the previous decades and died without much wealth to their names. The low point was in the 1970s: inherited capital accounted for just over 40 percent of total private capital. For the first time in history (except in new countries), wealth accumulated in the lifetime of the living constituted the majority of all wealth: nearly 60 percent. But now the share of inherited wealth in total wealth has grown steadily since the 1970s. Inherited wealth once again accounted for the majority of wealth in the 1980s, and according to the latest available figures it represents roughly two-thirds of private capital in France in 2010, compared with barely one-third of capital accumulated from savings. If current trends continue, the share of inherited wealth will continue to grow in the decades to come, surpassing 70 percent by 2020 and approaching 80 percent in the 2030s.

Since the 1980s there has been a massive increase in inequality coming from labour. This comes mainly from top managers of firms giving themselves massive pay rises (60 to 70 percent, depending on what definitions one chooses) of the top 0.1 percent of the income hierarchy in 2000- 2010 consists of top managers. By comparison, athletes, actors, and artists of all kinds make up less than 5 percent)
"One possible explanation of this is that the skills and productivity of these top managers rose suddenly in relation to those of other workers. Another explanation, which to me seems more plausible and turns out to be much more consistent with the evidence, is that these top managers by and large have the power to set their own remuneration, in some cases without limit and in many cases without any clear relation to their individual productivity."

The process by which wealth is accumulated and distributed contains powerful forces pushing toward inequality but forces of equality also exist, and in certain countries at certain times, these may prevail, but the forces of inequality can at any point regain the upper hand, as seems to be happening now.

Inequality in the USA and Europe is covered, how the histories of those countries effected capital and inequality, e.g early America had less inherited wealth than Europe, ownership of land was cheap and there was slavery. Other subjects covered are public wealth transferred to private hands (e.g privatization and oligarchs), public dept creating private wealth and many other related topics.

The theory of a stable capital-labour split (itself based on data only going back no further than 1950, thus missing the interwar period and early twentieth century) and thus flawed is now out of date thanks to studies of the 1970s showing a significant increase in the share of national income in the rich countries going to profits and capital and less going to wages and labour.

"The emergence of a patrimonial middle class was an important event. To be sure, wealth is still extremely concentrated today: the upper decile own 60 percent of Europe's wealth and more than 70 percent in the United States. 20 And the poorer half of the population are as poor today as they were in the past, with barely 5 percent of total wealth in 2010, just as in 1910. Basically, all the middle class managed to get its hands on was a few crumbs: scarcely more than a third of Europe's wealth and barely a quarter in the United States . This middle group has four times as many members as the top decile yet only one-half to one-third as much wealth. It is tempting to conclude that nothing has really changed: inequalities in the ownership of capital are still extreme"

What is the solution to this problem? The author suggest a global progressive tax on capital but he admits this would be very hard to implement. "The primary purpose of the capital tax is not to finance the social state but to regulate capitalism. The goal is first to stop the indefinite increase of inequality of wealth, and second to impose effective regulation on the financial and banking system in order to avoid crises. To achieve these two ends, the capital tax must first promote democratic and financial transparency: there should be clarity about who owns what assets around the world. Without a global tax on capital or some similar policy, there is a substantial risk that the top centile's share of global wealth will continue to grow indefinitely-- and this should worry everyone. In any case, truly democratic debate cannot proceed without reliable statistics."

This book has been getting rave reviews and what its states is going to upset a lot of people. It is good to see such detailed long term trend analysis based on data and personally I think this book is a masterpiece.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A painstaking and thought provoking but on the whole convincing ..., 14 Sep 2014
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A painstaking and thought provoking but on the whole convincing reworking of the accumulation of capital taking advantage of the huge improvement in statistical information during the past century or so. The long term choice seems to be a global wealth tax or revolution. If I were a betting man know which I would put my limited wealth on. I docked one star because it is a bit repetitive and the concluding sections seem to be rushed and do not entirelyy follow from the previous analysis.
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42 of 55 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Thought-provoking but flawed, 26 April 2014
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Eric Lonergan - See all my reviews
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One way to summarise is as follows: Piketty's astronomical sales have increased wealth inequality among economists. Is his new-found wealth deserved? What is the impact of this wealth on the democratic process? Should we tax his global sales? Should he set up a foundation to combat the negative effects of inequality?

This book's strength is the novel approach Piketty takes to framing the problem of inequality. We are all aware that the distribution of income and wealth has become more extreme in the last 30 years. It is usually assumed that policies of deregulation and taxation have caused this. More recently, Brynjolfsson and others have argued that technology and globalisation are the underlying causes. Piketty, however, draws attention to the fact that the rate of return which owners of wealth generate is itself a critical determinant of the distribution of wealth. A central part of his thesis is that the very wealthiest in society save more and earn higher returns on their investments. Labour income grows more slowly than wealth. This is a novel focus for the debate.

But Piketty's interpretation of the data and his predictions need to be considered very carefully. There are clear flaws. Much of the increase in the value of wealth in the last 30 years has been caused by declining real interest rates: this lies behind the huge capital gains in property, bonds and equities. But it is not repeatable. It is also likely to have economic consequences which drive down their prospective returns. For example, the surge in technological innovation which is creating many technology billionaires (in part due to financial conditions), is also sowing the seeds for the destruction of wealth in the industries it is rendering redundant.

What Piketty's framework does, however, is force us to focus on which types of assets are owned by whom and what their prospective returns might be. Piketty's tentative conclusion that the trend of wealth compounding at a rate higher than labour income may be right for the wrong reasons. The distribution of what is likely to be the highest returning asset - equity - is even more concentrated than property, or other financial assets, such as deposits. A structural reason why wealth may have an inherent tendency to become increasingly concentrated is that the wealthier you are the greater risk you can take with capital. Surprisingly, Piketty has little to say about shifts in the valuation and ownership of equities, which is hugely relevant to the last 30 years, and probably the next thirty.

Another omission in this fascinating book, is that Piketty does not sufficiently distinguish between the merits of various forms of wealth and returns. This is a legitimate criticism that Nassim Taleb has made. Tax policy should surely take into account the relative social merits of different forms of wealth. We want incentives that reward innovation and philanthropy which is focused on social enterprise and R&D, such as that of the Gates foundation. Unproductive wealth and disincentivising inheritance is a specific and more reasonable target for taxation.

There are also many more philosophical possibilities suggested by this book, which are beyond its remit but worth considering. The distribution of well-being and happiness in developed economies is much less extreme than the distribution of wealth, and arguably takes priority as a policy objective. It may also act as an incentive for more socially productive investment by the wealthy. We should not lose sight of this.

Despite these weaknesses, this book is original and thought-provoking. It is also written with clarity and style.

Eric Lonergan
Author, 'Money' published by Acumen
Money (second revised edition)
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5.0 out of 5 stars An important read for anyone looking for the causes of ..., 1 Sep 2014
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An important read for anyone looking for the causes of increasing wealth and income inequality. Piketty not only provides a lucid explanation of the reasons, he also outlines the damage caused to the social fabric as a result and offers his own solution to a problem which may in time threaten not only social stability, but capitalism itself.
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