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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 2 July 2014
The book has value and i suspect the concepts and principles are sound, so worth reading - However I found the dumbed down banter between the two authors running through the book to be rather tiring. Also it seems hard trying to find the key points in the book when reviewing it at a later stage as they are hidden amongst all the light hearted guff.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on 14 June 2014
When factual quite interesting but the constant machismo gets dreary very quickly i.e. 'Andy tore open the mars bar' couldn't just open it and is him even eating a Mars bar noteworthy. It felt like the school nerd was worshipping his new 'best mate'
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 3 March 2015
Absolutely brilliant. Illuminating. Educational. With a massive helping of humour. Facing the facts of psychopathy head on. And breaking down the myths with it. I've also learnt another perception of anxiety. Which actually beats any self help book I've read. And I've read hundreds. Well done to them both.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 April 2015
About 3/4 of way through book now and find it really helpful and insightful , lots of real world tips and new ways of looking at situations and thought processes , if your one of those people like me who always try to do the " good / right thing " for others and feel you always get stepped on and no good deed goes unpunished read this book for a new out-look that will definately help , trying to remember all the idea's and tips to put them into practice , definately going to re-read book when i'm finished , probably most helpful and down to earth book i've read , both writers Andy McNab and Kevin Dutton come across as really genuine guys , Andy McNab as the not so ordinary everyday man in the street with balls of steel and Kevin Dutton as the not so ordinary geek with added common sense . Helps you to see and deal with life's situations as they really are and not how you want them to be .
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I enjoyed this book. I'm glad Andy McNab is on our side and not against us. I hope there's still enough like him in our army and intelligence services.

I think he describes well how he sees the world and assesses decisions very quickly. Kevin Dutton explains the brain science and psychology behind this later.

It seems to come down to an ability to seize an opportunity when it exists, without fear of the consequences for others left behind. In other words the psychopath just does something (often with purpose and planning) without much conscience, agonising or consideration. He or she just sees that "the opportunity is there" and "if I don't take it someone else will." and "it's what has to be done." The psychopath seems to have little or no room for self doubt. This can make for good decisions, but it can also be dangerous in some. It's a more rigorously intellectual approach to decision making, but pros weigh more than cons, opportunities more than threats. In some scenarios getting our feelings out of the way is very useful, in others getting our thoughts and feelings to work together is a saner approach

There's an interesting, and rather different, approach to life described in this book, particularly around making decisions and taking actions. It may not be everyone's way of working, but you can learn a lot from this approach.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 23 July 2014
Like many people I was hoping for an entertaining read with some useful life tips.
What I got was a macho- boy guide to being successful, nasty ,but charming ,liberally sprinkled with CAPITALS, which became VERY tedious very QUICKLY.
Some other reviews have pointed out the boring interplay between the authors ,which could have made another tedious book.
You wouldn't have to be an extreme feminist to notice that the terms used are all directed towards men in careers and pursuits traditionally seen as male, high flying and/or risky.
It would have been much more interesting to see how women and other ordinary mortals can use a psychopathic tendency to enhance an "ordinary" life.
It just struck me that this guide might have been very useful for Lester Nygard in the recent series of "Fargo"!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 26 July 2014
Too anecdotal, and the information is hidden in rambling accounts where the narrator glorifies Andy McNab to the point where it becomes sycophantic!

A fun read, but not to be taken seriously.
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This is more of an experience than a book. It has a conversational and informal tone that makes it quite entertaining to read (though this can sometimes make it drag in parts), while imparting the necessary facts and knowledge to back up the claims of the authors’ anecdotes. Anyone with an interest in psychology or human behaviour will benefit greatly from this read, but it is accessible to everyone. Please don’t be put off by the use of the word “psychopath”, I’ve seen reviews where people either shy away from this book in the first instance because of it, or even after reading it misinterpret what the word actually means. If you are a psychopath you are not automatically Hannibal Lecter! A psychopath is just an individual with a particular set of personality traits, not necessarily a serial killer!

One thing I appreciated about this book, is that it doesn’t just do a lot of telling and then leave it there – at the end of each chapter there are tips on how to implement the advice in real life scenarios, and a multiple choice questionnaire you can use to rate your current performance or personal style, so you can identify areas for improvement.

Check out the full review on Confessions of a Book Geek!
www.confessionsofabookgeek.com
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 23 January 2015
There isn't a Kevin Dutton book I haven't read. His work with ''good'' ( subjective term) psychopath's has opened my eyes. I knew I was seriously different from most people. Especially because I am a woman and these books have clarified what I have known for sometime.
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on 4 July 2015
Very disappointing book. I think the biggest problem I have is the constant reference to Andy McNab being referred to as a "good psychopath", when actually he comes across more like an utter dick. Lacking in empathy, arrogant and selfish behaviour may get you further in life, but are these characteristics something to aspire to? The book offers you fortune cookie advice on how to tap into your inner psychopath, but there's no real insight displayed here. It seems to be an interesting subject that's been really badly handled, and -as many reviewers have mentioned- the laddish 'interplay' between the two authors is tiresome and irritating.
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