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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An insight into the pianist in full flight.
The Yellow collectors Edition-piano is the companion to the Light green violin edition by Ideal Audience. Whereas, the Violin bluray was 1045 minutes, the piano edition is 945 minutes, each on one disc only. So, in the future we will probably see the entire Wagner Ring cycle on one disc. I shall give details of each pianist and the pieces they play. The sound is good,...
Published 8 months ago by Ultrarunner

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Beethoven Collectors edition
Was disappointed in general with this collection in. there are far better recording with these artist's performing these works on the market.
Published 1 month ago by Roy Newitt


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An insight into the pianist in full flight., 5 April 2014
By 
Ultrarunner (Perth-West Australia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Beethoven: Collectors Edition Piano [Glenn Gould, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli] [Blu-ray] [2014] (Blu-ray)
The Yellow collectors Edition-piano is the companion to the Light green violin edition by Ideal Audience. Whereas, the Violin bluray was 1045 minutes, the piano edition is 945 minutes, each on one disc only. So, in the future we will probably see the entire Wagner Ring cycle on one disc. I shall give details of each pianist and the pieces they play. The sound is good, but the black and white film varies from good to fuzzy. There is more coloured film in this piano version, than the violin edition. The booklet has details of the pianist's life plus music they play.

GLENN GOULD: The film called the Alchemist, is by Bruno Monsaingeon, is in 4 parts and in colour. Made in Toronto, 1974. He also made a film, La Musique et la nature in Black and white about the cellist Tortelier in 1972, Germany,found in the edition about the Violin and Cello. Bruno mentions that this is the first time you have probably seen Gould. "He is notorious for his extreme eccentricity. His career was cut short at 32, for he resolved never to be seen in public again, as he hated the whole hedonistic circus. He is a legend amongest other pianists".

Gould comes in carrying something, and puts it near the piano. " What is that " says Bruno. Mortified, Gould replies," This thing is my chair, without which I cannot function. It is apart of my family." "Really", says the astonished Bruno. The chair in question, is small, old and tattered, has a frame and legs, with hardly any seat left. He sits very low down at the piano. "How long have you had it". " For 21 years". Looking at the questioner as if he was being rude. "Why did you give up playing concerts." "I was not prepared for the blood sport of concert going. Once it was thrust upon me, I felt it was appalling. I was distinctly uncomfortable." Bruno let him carry on in that manner for a while. " A concert is outdated. I have no wish to have personal contact with the public".

Bruno asks Gould about his manner of recording. " Most pianists record their music and leave the cutting to others, but you cut the recording tape." "Yes," Gould warming to his subject. " It may be egotistical, but I like to have control, very undemocratic, in other ways I am democratic, for I would like the listener of my records, to change it around to their liking." He then explains. Bruno is lost, so am I. At times he does sing when playing; his Mother taught him that. I can understand him not liking a crowd and wishing to record in the studio, but why would he want to be filmed. I have only given you a teaser, the rest you will have to find out by buying this Bluray. But I will add, that for me, music should be shared. I like nothing better then a live concert, opera, or recording. Also, a soloist, or conductor, who loves what they are doing, and cannot do without the stage like Bernstein. However,Gould's way is valid and he has many followers. Some of his recordings are now considered classics in their field.

SCHOENBERG: Intermezzo. BACH: Sarabande from Bach's Suite no 1. SCRIABIN -Desir. WAGNER: Die Meistersingers piano version (much singing). WEBERN: Variation op 27. BERG: Sonata op 1. BACH: Partita no 6. (157.18 minutes.)

ARTURO BENEDETTI MICHELANGELI: He was famed for cancelling at the last minute, he became the scourge of agents and concert -organisers the world over. But anyone who did experience one of the few concerts he gave was unlikely to forget it. The Debussy Preludes became a benchmark for future pianists. He was a perfectionist and he practiced for years before he was prepared to perform them on stage.

SCARLATTI: Sonata in C minor, K 11. Sonata in C major, K 159. CHOPIN: Mazurka in g sharp minor, op 33 No 1. Mazurka in B minor, op 33 no 44. DEBUSSY: Hommage a Rameau from images, Set 1. Paris 1965. Black and white. DEBUSSY: Preludes, Book 1. Colour. Paris 1978. His Preludes are sublime. ( 68 37 minutes )

GEORGES CZIFFRA: He fought in the Second World War, and ended up in a Russian Gulag. Then a botched attempt to flee Communist Hungary saw him sent to prison for three years. Thereafter, he and his family were allowed to leave and he ended up in France. He never lost the ability to play works almost as if he was improvising them and this gave him a freedom which more conservatively educated pianists probably never had. He went on to perform with his son, Gyorgy junior, an extremely gifted conductor. There is an inner trust between the the two artists; the son's wonderful conducting and the father's sensitive concentration on interplay with the orchestra in their recording of the Franck piece on this bluray.

His son died at the age of 38 in 1981. Georges never played with an orchestra again and died in 1994. Gyorgy jnr nearly died as a child during imprisonment with his family. In 1981 he set fire to his house in the Paris suburbs. A suicide note was found in the remains, thus his death was ruled a suicide. The unoffical story however, is that his death was an accident.( Wikipedia)

CHOPIN: Polonaise in A flat major "Heroic". LISZT: Etude d' execution transcendante in F minor no 10. Hungarian Rhapsody no 6.Theatre des Champs-Elysees, Paris 1961. CHOPIN: Scherzo in B flat minor, op 31. Impromptu in G flat-major,op 51. LISZT: Gnomenreigen-Concert study no 2. Valse-Impromptu, grand Galop chromatiques. Paris, 1963. FRANCK: Variations Symphoniques, Georges Cziffra Piano, orchestre national de l'Ortf. cond Gyorgy Cziffra Jnr. Paris. 1965. I like Cziffra, he smiles, and looks as though he is enjoying himself. He is exhaused at the end of one of the piano pieces. BENNO MOISEIWITSCH Wagner Tannhauser overture arr for piano by Lizst. BBC studio, London 1954. Black and white. (77.32 minutes). Black and white.

WILHELM KEMPFF: He is not the man for thunderous playing, fortissimo or florid gestures. With his inspired, introspective style of playing Kempff hits the nerve of the music. Thus, Beethoven and Schumann, were the composers for whose work Kempff set the standard for generations to come. For me, he is the master. I own the DGG Schumann Piano works. 4 CDs, by Kempff. In parts of the Moonlight,it seems as though he is meditating.

SCHUMANN: Arabeske in C major, op 18. Papillions, op 2. Paris 1961. Davidsbundlertanze op 6. Book 1 and 2. Besancon 1963.Black and white. BEETHOVEN: Piano sonata no 17, the Tempest. Paris, 1968.BLack white,at times it fades. Piano Sonata no 14 Moonlight. The opening is beautiful, which cannot be expressed in words, for they are so limited. Colour. Piano sonata No 27, Paris, 1970. Colour. (101. 00) minutes.

ALDO CICCOLINI: He has an almost irresistible elegance of phrasing and a dreamy melodiousness. He plays today at 88. In 2013 he was granted a lifetime Achievement Award. You can see he loves the music he is playing.

DE FALLA: Noches en los jardines Espana. Orchestre National de la RTF. cond Roberto Benzi. Paris, 1960. 2nd and 3rd movement, hazy film. PICK-MANGIAGALLI: La Dance d' Olaf from: Deux Lunaires, op 33.ALBENIZ: Cadiz from Suite espanola no 1. Paris, 1960.MENDELSSOHN: Songs without songs. No 6, No 30, No 21, No 34. SCHUBERT: Impromptu in E flat major,D 899 No 2 Allegro. BEETHOVEN: Piano concerto No 4. Orchestre national de l'ortf,cond Georges Sebastian. Paris, 1962. LISZT: Funerailles from: Harmonies poetiques et religieuses.GRANADOS: Quejas, o La maja y el ruisenor from: Goyescas. Paris,1965. Allegro de Concierto Op 46.CHABRIER: Pieces pittoresques.Paris,1967. ( 112.01 minutes ). Black and white

SAMSON FRANCOIS: He died aged 46. He was a playboy, who was not averse to the excesses of alcohol or drugs. His playing style is utterly emotional, vivid and colourful. The sound he produces is of an exceptional brilliance and warmth. He seems almost as though he improvises. He was not afraid of taking risks. He did devide critics, some called him eccentric, others imaginative. He has a twinkle in his eye when playing. A character.

CHOPIN: Concerto for Piano and orchestra no 1. Orchestre national de la RTF cond Stanislav Skrowaczewski. Paris, 1962. Francois winks at the conductor. Waltz no 11 in G flat major,op 70 no 1.Deauville 1954. RAVEL: Concerto for piano and orchestra in G major. Orchestre national de la RTF. Cond John Pritchard. Paris,1964. Forlane from Le Tombeau de Couperin.Paris, 1959. DEBUSSY: Toccata. Laplus que lente. L'isle Joyeuse. RAVEL: Concerto for the left hand for piano and orchestra. Orchestre national de l'Opera de Monte-Carlo. Cond louis Fremaux. Paris, 1964. Grieg. GRIEG: Concerto for piano and Orchestra . Orchestre national de l'Ortf. Cond Louis Fremaux. Paris, 1967. ( 126.17. minutes.) Black and white.

CLAUDIO ARRAU: He was seen as the sophisticate amongest pianists of the 20th Century. He was a disciplined musician , his interpretations exceedingly cultivated and stylish. His playing was unusually songful.

SCHUMANN: Concerto for piano and orchestra. London Philharmonic Orchestra. Cond Georges Hurst. London, 1963. Carnaval lop 9.London 1961. BEETHOVEN: Piano sonata no 32 Paris, 1970. SOLOMON: Piano Sonata no 23 "Appassionata". The recording is the only performance of the legendary pianist Solomon which is perserved on film. London 1956. The sound is fine, but the film is old. You can only just make out Solomon in the long shot. ( 113.00 minutes.) Black and white.

EMIL GILELS Piano & ANDRE CLUYTENS.Conductor. Gilels never shied away from risk-taking. He died in Moscow in 1985, before completing Beethoven's Sonatas. I own them. Well worth buying. RAVEL: Daphnis et Chloe. 3 fragments. MUSSORGSKY:Pictures at an exhibition. orchestration by Ravel. Orchestre national de la RTF. Cond Andre Cluytens. Paris, 1960. TCHAIKOVSKY: Concerto No 1 for Piano and Orchestra. Orchestre national de la RTF. Emil Gilels piano Andre Cluytens conductor. Theatre des Champs-Elysees 1959. Prokofiev piano sonata No 3 Emil Gilels piano. London,1959. ( 87.32 minutes.) Black and white.

BYRON JANIS: PROKOFIEV: Concerto for piano and orchestra No 3 in C major op 26. orchestre national de la RTF. Conductor Paul Paray.Paris, 1963. RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini. Orchestre Philharmonique de l'Ortf. Cond Louis de Froment. Paris, 1968. Beautifully played. ( 51.30 minutes.) Black and white.

ALFRED BRENDEL: he says Fischer, Cortot and Kempff had the greatest influence on the way he plays. His playing is of a very intellectual Nature.

BEETHOVEN: piano sonata no 29 Hammerklavier. Paris, 1970. Six Bagatelles for Piano op 126. No 2 allegro. No 3 Andante cantabile e grazioso. Paris, 1970. He is very much into his playing, he moves around a lot and shows his emotion, like the violinists. ( 51.29 minutes).

This bluray is for those who like pianists of the past. However, music is a subjective art form, it is not like a painting, or book where one can be objective. So a music review is merely an opinion and a matter of taste, to guide others. I wish it were not so, but music is such a fleeting experience. It is not static like the forms of art I have mentioned.

SD NTSC 4.3 on Bluray. PCM 2.0 dual mono. Dolby Digtal 2.0 dual mono. Subtitles. German. English. French. Spanish. REGION.ALL.

When Archive comes up on the screen, press the remote button surrounded by four arrows, 10 boxes pop up. A yellow box will be around one of them. Use the arrows to move the yellow box on the pianist you want to hear, and press the middle button.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An invaluable resource compiled from SD television broadcasts and making use of the extended capacity of the Blu-ray format, 31 Mar 2014
By 
I. Giles (Argyll, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Beethoven: Collectors Edition Piano [Glenn Gould, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli] [Blu-ray] [2014] (Blu-ray)
Quite apart from the considerable musical content of this disc, all of which has been seen and heard for the purposes of this review, the huge playing time probably needs some explanation for those of a sceptical disposition. The Blu-ray format has a capacity of several DVDs in just the same way that DVDs have more capacity than VHS tapes and, in an earlier generation, LP (long playing) records had much greater capacity than 78 rpm records.

The greater capacity can be used in two ways. Usually it is used to carry High Definition files which, because of their high definition, require much more capacity. However, it would be just as possible for the Blu-ray disc to use its greater capacity to have much longer playing times when the source material is of lower resolution and thus requiring less capacity per item.

That is what has happened here. The original source material is that of television broadcasts taped on video tape and at the quality associated with television broadcasts of the 1960's and 1970's. Videotape could be described as Low Definition by contrast with modern High Definition recordings. Consequently we are able to experience all that broadcast material conveniently gathered together on a single disc.

Audio-video recording has been an area of great advancement since these live broadcast recordings were made. The quality of these recordings falls far below the standards achieved by EMI for example in the 1980's or Metropolitan Munich in the 1980's-1990's. As described above, these are standard definition recordings made at a time of infancy in that area of recording. Modern standard definition recording, let alone HD recording, is vastly superior and fundamentally a totally different product in terms of recording quality. In addition, those wishing for equivalent audio recording, LP or CD source, from the 1950's will be greatly disappointed. That, however, is to miss the point entirely. These recordings derive from French broadcasting of very limited audio-video quality but of high value in terms of archive footage which is otherwise unavailable. It is on that specific basis that these recordings must be judged and will appeal mainly to collectors with that interest in mind.

Thus we are introduced to the work of the following key pianists - Glenn Gould; Arturo Michelangeli; Georges Cziffra; Wilhelm Kempff; Aldo Ciccolini; Samson Francois; Claudio Arrau; Emil Gilels; Byron Janis and Alfred Brendel. In a review of a disc of this duration and coverage it would be invidious to single out items of superior merit. However it is fair and essential to note that each soloist is well represented with some core personal repertoire and that the 'live' nature of the broadcast material ensures a degree of special frisson which, for many, will overcome the obvious deficiencies of the recordings of those times.

The 10 featured soloists average out at just over 94 minutes each although that figure is only intended to give a rough guide. They are shown playing a range of music which has been chosen as being particularly associated with their individual repertoire. Thus Michelangeli is heard in Debussy, Cziffra with Chopin and Liszt, Kempff with Beethoven and Schumann, Ciccolini with Spanish flavoured music plus Beethoven's 4th Piano Concerto, Francois with Debussy plus Ravel's G major concerto and Chopin's 1st Piano Concerto, Arrau with Schumann and Beethoven, Gilels with a Russian program including Tchaikovsky's 1st Piano Concerto, Janis with Prokofiev's 3rd Piano Concerto plus Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody and Brendel with Beethoven. The disc opens with a documentary about Glenn Gould followed by some Bach.

This is a collection that makes no claims of being comprehensively finite in terms of the featured pianists or their featured repertoire. What it does offer is a valuable resource chronicling the work of some of the finest exponents of piano playing from the early days of television broadcasting. As an inevitable consequence, it also offers purchasers the chance to observe these famous pianists in an earlier stage in their careers and at a time when some were still in the process of establishing themselves or confirming their eminence. As such it deserves the gratitude of interested collectors who will find it to offer very good value as well as musical illumination.

This collection will be of great interest to those who have an interest in historical recordings and these have been gathered together and presented as a very convenient collection similar to that of the Classic Archive of Strings released recently. The use of the Blu-ray format with its larger capacity has been imaginatively used to maximise access to a considerable amount of historical material which might otherwise have been lost to collectors of such material.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Beethoven Collectors edition, 26 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Beethoven: Collectors Edition Piano [Glenn Gould, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli] [Blu-ray] [2014] (Blu-ray)
Was disappointed in general with this collection in. there are far better recording with these artist's performing these works on the market.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Archive Performances, 3 April 2014
By 
E. Parker "Ted" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Beethoven: Collectors Edition Piano [Glenn Gould, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli] [Blu-ray] [2014] (Blu-ray)
This continues the reissues of the DVD's in a very accessible Standard Definition BluRay. ("Ensembles" the third in the series is according to Euroarts due for release in May this year). As with the Strings release their are a few gems at the end of some of the big named pianists such as Benno Moiseiwitisch at the end of Cziffra sections playing Wagner/Liszt Tannhauser Overture. Solomon playing Beethoven Piano Sonata 23 Appassionata at the end of Arrau section, which it states is the only film of this artist. As I said of the original "strings" release these are a no brainer purchases especially at these prices. Enjoy.
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Beethoven: Collectors Edition Piano [Glenn Gould, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli] [Blu-ray] [2014]
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