Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Read
A terrible deed occurred in the city of Exeter and forty years on some of the city's most prominent citizens cannot forget the part they played in the murder that happened within the Cathedral close.

An unfortunate accident to one of the stone masons working on the new Cathedral triggers a sequence of events that leads to the murder of a prominent citizen. The...
Published on 23 Aug 2005 by J. Chippindale

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Weak and Disjointed Effort
I had high hopes for this book, as the historical introduction set up a potentially interesting story, and the author appeared to be well researched and enthusiastic. In reality, I had an immediate feeling that I was reading a screenplay, as opposed to a well - planned novel. The action flits from character to character with bewildering rapidity, leaving a confused and...
Published on 2 Dec 2006 by J. G. Cheseldine


Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Read, 23 Aug 2005
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
A terrible deed occurred in the city of Exeter and forty years on some of the city's most prominent citizens cannot forget the part they played in the murder that happened within the Cathedral close.

An unfortunate accident to one of the stone masons working on the new Cathedral triggers a sequence of events that leads to the murder of a prominent citizen. The Dean who has asked for help from Sir Baldwin in his capacity as Keeper of the King's Peace, sends a messenger to his manor requesting his help in solving the murder.

Sir Baldwin in turn sends to his friend Simon to come and assist him, particularly as he knows he would like a break from his new job, which Simon detests, but has not got the heart to tell his employer the Abbott.

Baldwin has hardly arrived in Exeter before another murder takes place. Slowly he begins to put together what happened forty years ago and the names of the people involved. Are the current murders connected with what happened so long ago . . .

I really enjoyed this one and think that Mr. Jecks is back to his best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a good read, 1 April 2007
By 
tregatt (Portland, Oregon) - See all my reviews
While this latest West Country mystery featuring Keeper of the King's Peace, Sir Baldwin Furnshill, and his good friend and fellow crime solver, Bailiff Simon Puttock, may not be as suspenseful or as edgy as previous West Country installments, it still did make for a rather engrossing and compelling read. One piece of advice though: read author Michael Jecks' note at the very beginning of the book carefully because the murder of Chaunter Walter de Lecchelade at Exeter Cathedral in 1283 lies at the center of "The Chapel of Bones," and would help many readers understand better what's going on in the earlier chapters.

In 1283, the Chaunter of Exeter Cathedral, Walter de Leccehlade is brutally murdered, along with the churchmen loyal to him, by churchmen who opposed him and by certain townsmen who felt hostile towards him. Some of the churchmen involved in the murder were punished, while others kept quiet and melted into the background. The townsmen involved were never betrayed by their ecclesiastical accomplices, and so they too blended back into the background, even though the then mayor of Exeter was hanged by Edward I as punishment for their crime. And for the next forty years, everyone went on with their lives and tried hard to forget that fateful and awful night. But now, in 1323, as the cathedral is being rebuilt, and three men who had left Exeter after the dreadful events of 1283 are back again in the city of their childhood. One of the men is the mason, Thomas, who had fled Exeter in guilt over his part in the murder; the other man is Friar Nicholas, who had left after being so grievously injured during the attack; while the third man is the priory's new corrodian, William, who left Exeter to serve Edward I. Many of the townsmen who had taken part in the murder and who had never left are not happy to see these men back again. And when one of the townsmen, the wealthy saddler Henry Potell, is slain on Cathedral grounds, both Sir Baldwin and Simon (summoned to help discover the murderer) naturally begin to wonder if Potell's murder is linked to the events of 1283, or if Potell, who seems to have been in the middle of two disputes with a rich German client and with his old friend, joiner Joel Lytell, was murdered over something else. But when another man who was involved in the 1283 killing is also found murdered, Sir Baldwin and Simon realise that what their dealing with is someone with a secret to hide and who is willing to kill in order to protect that secret...

Even though the plot was fairly straightforward, with very few surprising twists or turns, "The Chapel of Bones" still made for an enjoyable read. As usual the author has written a book that is rich in ambiance, colour and historical detail. And the character development was brilliantly done as well -- each character, no matter how small was vividly and credibly rendered. I especially liked the manner in which the author showed us how the guilt that many of the characters felt over the wrongs that they had committed, coloured and affected their lives. And if I was a little disappointed that the mystery subplot was not a very perplexing one, Michael Jecks' stark accounting of how guilt and loss affects people more than made "The Chapel of Bones" a good and worthwhile read.

(Why, though, has this series been subtitled a "Knights Templar" mystery? The Knights Templar don't figure into this series at all -- or at least not since "The Last Templar," and that was about 18 mysteries ago, where Sir Baldwin put his past firmly behind him. It seems rather strange to bring up the Knights Templar at this stage. Is it a marketing ploy?)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Jecks is Always Worth the Read, 3 Sep 2009
By 
Bookaholic "prussblue" (St. Louis area, MO USA) - See all my reviews
I confess to having written this review elsewhere, but I know that I and others find an author like Jecks to be a "cut above" some others in the genre. However, readers today may enjoy an author but not pay them back with a few moments of review to encourage them as well as share the author with others.

Rather than just provide you with a synopsis of the book, I will note that a few years ago I started reading late in the series. I was eventually compelled to search in book stores and online for the earlier books in the series so that I could read them in sequence of publication. To date, and I have the latest in the series which is #27, I have not regretted that effort. I find the Jecks Knights Templar Mysteries a joy to read both from the perspective of the history and the excellent weaving of a mystery tale that includes the personal trials of the main characters and their families. I should mention that I have had others read some of his work without knowing the author and compare it to others also without the author known. Consistently, they pick out Jecks as the preferred author for quality of writing within an historical framework. What amazes me is how Jecks continues a high quality of writing in this genre and, to me, seems to get better over time. There are those authors who may write one good tale, the next not as good as the previous, etc., but for me, Jecks continues to astonish me we consistently good reads. You may feel that you know how a particular title is going to end, but you probably won't see the twist he may include. If you like those authors who "feed you the ending" so that you can pat yourself on the back for being so clever, you may prefer the "penny mystery" style. If you are not particular about historical accuracy, you may prefer those who "dress up" a character in a costume that might or might not be right for the period. So, if you like "penny mystery" and "dress up" look for those authors. But, if you want to enjoy a read and want more, read Jecks. BTW, that goes for the U.K.(spent time there and still have associations)or the U.S.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Weak and Disjointed Effort, 2 Dec 2006
By 
J. G. Cheseldine (Gloucestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I had high hopes for this book, as the historical introduction set up a potentially interesting story, and the author appeared to be well researched and enthusiastic. In reality, I had an immediate feeling that I was reading a screenplay, as opposed to a well - planned novel. The action flits from character to character with bewildering rapidity, leaving a confused and unfocused impression with little depth, and it is very difficult to comprehend who the main characters really are in the story at all.

The atmosphere of mediaeval England is touched upon only sporadically, and the crux of the plot is a confusing episode which took place 40 years earlier in history, meaning most of the people in the book are over 60 years old - most unlikely in early 14th century England.

I wouldn't recommend this book on any level - there is wealth of historical fiction being written at the moment,but this is the near the bottom of the barrel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars the chapel of bones, 8 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Chapel of Bones: (Knights Templar 18) (Knights Templar Mysteries) (Kindle Edition)
I have just bought this for my kindle. I have already read it but would like to read it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, 25 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I enjoyed this book. I am trying to read them in chronological order but not sure that I have managed it. Know I missed one so far but never mind. I just love following the 'lives' of the main characters.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece, 9 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Michael Jecks hits the spot with an intriguing mystery that you can't put down. I love Simon and Baldwin and can't wait to read the next book in the series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Such an interesting read., 1 Feb 2013
By 
Mrs. Ma Dormer "moremed" (U.K.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
On reading this novel it is interesting to look up the background, which is based on fact. Anyone who knows Exeter and loves its Cathedral will enjoy this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not up to par, 24 April 2006
By 
Nimuje (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
I strongly disagree with the first reviewer of this item; I used to love Michael Jecks' series including the ever-troubled former Knight Templar, Sir Baldwin, and the sturdy, down-to-earth Bailiff, Simon, but this book was just a jumble of plots and thoughts.

The idea that a cruel murder would still leave traces forty years later was interesting but I resented how often the old story was told. I couldn't care less for most of the people involved and the hasty attempt at tying all knots and leave us with an ending not far short of a fairy tale was downright sloppy.

I tried to read the last two books (thank goodness I didn't buy them) and I didn't care for them either.

Maybe it's just a case of writer's block while the author has to fulfill his due? I hope it is because the first 8 or so books were compelling, convincing and gripping.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 7 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Chapel of Bones: (Knights Templar 18) (Knights Templar Mysteries) (Kindle Edition)
To class as ever
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews