Customer Reviews


20 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fallout
Set mostly in London in 1970s, Sadie Jones' fourth novel focuses on Luke Kanowski, a young, good-looking and charismatic playwright who has an unhappy childhood behind him - his French mother has been in an asylum for the insane since he was a small boy and his Polish father takes refuge by drinking himself into oblivion. Setting off from his dreary Northern hometown with...
Published 4 months ago by Susie B

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three and a half stars?
While I enjoyed Sadie Jones's first two novels, The Outcast and Small Wars, I didn't get on very well with her third, The Uninvited Guests. I'm pleased to say that she's back on form with her fourth - if 'form' is the word for it. I have a funny relationship with Jones's fiction; for me, it seems to be constantly caught between the mediocre and the memorable, and while...
Published 3 months ago by Laura T


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fallout, 1 May 2014
By 
Susie B - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Fallout (Hardcover)
Set mostly in London in 1970s, Sadie Jones' fourth novel focuses on Luke Kanowski, a young, good-looking and charismatic playwright who has an unhappy childhood behind him - his French mother has been in an asylum for the insane since he was a small boy and his Polish father takes refuge by drinking himself into oblivion. Setting off from his dreary Northern hometown with two holdalls and his record player, Luke arrives in London and looks up an acquaintance, Paul Driscoll, a young, would-be producer and they soon set up a small theatre company called Graft, situated in a pub where they stage radical plays. Before long they are joined by Leigh Radley, an attractive stage manager who, although very attracted to Luke, becomes Paul's girlfriend, and the three of them move into a rather cramped flat together. In his spare time, and when he is not chasing women, Luke spends hours in his room furiously writing and although he is highly critical of his work, he finally produces a play that becomes a resounding success. His success brings him into the orbit of well-known producer, Tony Moore, and his beautiful but fragile actress wife, Nina. When Luke and Nina set eyes on one another, they fall headlong for one another - but Tony, who is a manipulative and controlling man with unpalatable sexual proclivities is not, for reasons of his own, prepared to let Nina go (and does she really want to?) - and soon everyone around them becomes involved in the fallout.

This is an intense and involving story, where period and setting are carefully evoked and one which explores emotional damage and control. Although not a fast-paced, or plot-driven tale, it does have its compelling moments, and Sadie Jones' portrayal of the world of theatre is particularly convincing with some interesting scenes of drama both on and off the stage. It is true that several of the characters are self-regarding individuals who do not invite immediate sympathy, especially Nina's cold, selfish and ambitious actress mother - however, Luke's torment is very convincingly portrayed - both as a teenager, when in a heart-breaking scene he manages to escape from the asylum with his mother, dressed in her daisy cardigan and wellington boots, and takes her to the National Gallery; and then later, as young man when he suffers further torment with his longing for Nina. An immersive and fraught story of love and loss, of the damage people do to one another, and of being careful what you wish for.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three and a half stars?, 31 May 2014
By 
Laura T (Bradford-on-Avon, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
While I enjoyed Sadie Jones's first two novels, The Outcast and Small Wars, I didn't get on very well with her third, The Uninvited Guests. I'm pleased to say that she's back on form with her fourth - if 'form' is the word for it. I have a funny relationship with Jones's fiction; for me, it seems to be constantly caught between the mediocre and the memorable, and while her novels are not forgettable, they often seem to become more old-fashioned than they ought to be. Fallout is no exception, despite its evocative portrayal of 1970s London theatre makers, and I'm afraid, as with The Outcast, I had to return to its gender roles to try to work out why.

Luke is from a working-class family in the north-east, and feeds his obsession with the theatre by collecting playbills and programmes from performances he cannot afford to go to. A chance meeting with Paul, an aspiring producer, and Leigh, his assistant, propels Luke from his familiar world and inspires him to head to London. Turning up on Paul's doorstep, he is taken on to help with their fledgling company, working as a bin man part-time to pay his rent. When Luke starts to write his own plays, the promise of an entirely different future opens up before him, although he is still tethered by his painful past, especially his mother, confined to a mental institute. As Luke struggles with his writing, young actress Nina Jacobs is crumpling under the weight of her mother's expectations and her own frailty. Even when she wins a central role in her drama school's end-of-year production of Chekhov's Three Sisters, she is unable to deal with the strain of a problematic relationship alongside her part. As Paul, Leigh, Luke and Nina continue with their careers, their fates increasingly begin to intertwine, and Nina and Luke enter into a desperate and volatile affair. What will be left of them both when the smoke clears?

The obsessive love between Nina and Luke is at the centre of this novel, but I felt that Jones was only halfway there with her portrayal of its unholy strength. A significant problem for me lay not in the portrayal of the relationship itself but in the depiction of their two characters. Luke was a stand-out for me from the start, never becoming a naive working-class stereotype but standing up for himself even in a world that he knows little about, and ultimately becoming a greater part of it than those who were born to the theatre. Nina, however, was far more problematic. Much as I detest the use of the term 'strong female character' and the depictions of fictional women who do little else but be strong, I think I can see its flipside here with Nina, who is essentially defined by her weakness. Jones does a good job with the interplay between Luke's long-established role as his mother's carer and his attraction to Nina's vulnerability, but it's difficult to understand why Nina is so attracted to Luke, other than that he represents something so different from everything else in her life. The supporting characters add little. Paul never felt like much more than a name to me, and Leigh, despite enjoying considerable success in her own right, remains Nina's foil, a stable shoulder to cry on who struggles to escape from the set of contrasts Jones sets up between the two women - one of whom is 'good' (for her romantic partners) and one of whom is decidedly not.

It's these stagnant gender roles that mar Fallout, despite its strong writing and interesting subject matter. While still worth reading, especially if you have enjoyed Jones's previous novels, I'm afraid it only confirms my previous frustrations with Jones's work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Playing at Love; The Play of Love; The Play's, after all, The Thing, 1 May 2014
By 
This review is from: Fallout (Hardcover)
I hoovered up Sadie Jones' novel about love, friendship, theatre and writing, which is primarily set in 1970s London, like a famished woman who hadn't seen food for days.

In fact, it was tempting NOT to stop and explore what there was to eat, as it got in the way of reading time.

Reading Jones' bio, it turns out she is the daughter of a playwright and an actor, so I was chortling `told you so, told you so' to myself, as the authenticity of both the theatrical world, the craft of writing for the theatre world, the small-scale brave production world of UK theatre in the 1970s and the world of the acting fraternity, particularly within work, rang out truthfully.

In some ways (the tangle of passion, the tangle of live performance creativity, the tangle of intense belief in what art and theatre might be ABOUT) this reminded me of Michael Blakemore's Next Season, which has at its centre the actor, whereas here the major role belongs to a writer and his confederates.

Lucasz Kanowski is scarred by being the son of a woman shut away in a mental hospital, and an alcoholic father. He is brittle, fragile, attractive to women and damaged. He is also a compulsive writer, a compulsive reader of plays, drawn to the magic of theatre without ever having seen live performance. It is the 70s before Thatcher, where the Arts were funded, where there was a real buzz around innovative theatre. Luke, later re-inventing himself as Luke Last, has a chance encounter with a young and vibrant would be theatrical producer, Paul, and his possible-might-get-a-leg-over companion Leigh, a sharp tongued young woman with a desire to write. The chance encounter leads to a close friendship between the three, as they pursue their dreams of love and creative work, to a greater or lesser degree of success.

Luke, the central character, pursues and is pursued by women, breaking hearts without meaning to, his curious, honest, direct fragility, without any macho notching up conquests, being part of his dangerous allure.

Jones is a clear writer. The narrative proceeds, well; the central three characters are extremely likeable, idealistic and genuine, and the reader cannot help but root for each of them to survive well. There is a circle of less than attractive, also damaged characters in this world, some of whom choose to inflict damage, some of whom inflict damage without consciously trying to do so.

Jones is as adept at charting the shifting shape of love as she is in describing that world of 70s theatre.

"There was no morning, none to recognise. The sun rose and lit the day, but like a mortal thing the love between them had tipped over into decay

"Let's leave today," she said.

He tried to find words - he who could always find words. He wanted to make her promises, tell her he could save her, and wouldn't give up, but he couldn't find any faith to offer"

I received this as an ARC for review, from the publishers
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good novel with flaws, 23 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
I found the first half of the book rather plodding and almost gave up on it. The second half improved and I then felt myself being drawn into the characters enough to care what happened.
There were some interesting observations on relationships and how complex they can become.
I thoroughly enjoyed Sadie Jones first two novels and there are glimmers of her talent in this book but it falls short on being a satisfying complete story.
Jackie
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Difficult relationships !!, 26 May 2014
By 
David H J Ashdown (Wales) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Fallout (Hardcover)
Set in the late 1960s and up to 1975 it follows the fortunes of young playwright Luke as he struggles with trouble at home with his ex-fighter pilot Polish father and his French mother in an asylum. As he makes a break for London to discover himself he teams up with various theatrical people in the hope of establishing some meaning in his life but will his hang-ups stymie his efforts. An excellent novel to add to Sadie Jones's portfolio and quite different from the other novels written by her.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book, 21 May 2014
By 
Rhona Murfin - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
It is beautifully written but where this often suggests it's difficult to read - it is not.

The story, set principally in a theatrical context, is enthralling and the characters diverse, interesting, intriguing. I am not sure why I've held back the fifth star but it could be because there is a slight emptiness at the heart of some of the characters but then again could this be the brittleness of the 'luvvies'? Don't let it put you off : it's a great read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 8 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
I love Sadie Jones as I find her books tackle little-known environments and times, Fallout is no different. Set in the world of theatre in the 1970s it traces the life of Luke who is a fascinating character. Her characters are gripping, if not very likable at times but throughout it is beautifully written. I would recommend.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 9 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
Disappointing compared to her previous work
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 2 July 2014
By 
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
An interesting set of characters - whose lives intertwine due to their shared interest in the theatre.

Luke meets Paul and Leigh by chance in a sudden downpour. He learns that Paul is a would-be producer. Years later Luke comes to live in London and teams up with Paul. Luke meets Nina after seeing her in a play.

Both Luke and Nina had difficult childhoods. Luke's mother spent most of his life in the local lunatic asylum. His father was a heavy drinker. Nina,
aspiring actress, is the daughter of an actress, now past her prime and living life vicariously through her daughter.

Relationships form and break up, deceptions and jealousies abound - a good read
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Loved This Passionate and Compelling Book, 2 Jun 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fallout (Kindle Edition)
Having read all three of Sadie Jone's books ( got hooked after the first one, The Outcast) I was really looking forward to this, her latest, and I was not disappointed. Set in the world of 60s/70s theatreland, the story, about passionate/obsessive love, had me on the edge of my seat. The characters are so real, as in her other work Jones has a real knack of getting inside their heads and making you understand their feelings, even when they behave in unpredictable ways. Loved it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Fallout
Fallout by Sadie Jones
£2.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews