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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mad Hatter finally comes of age in the Batman's rogues' gallery
The story running through issue #16-21 of the New 52's Batman - The Dark Knight is collected, along with Annual #1, as Batman The Dark Knight Volume 3: Mad (The New 52). This time it is the Mad Hatter's turn to be dissected in this six-issue story (the Annual is unconnected). The six excellently-scripted and illustrated chapters gradualy reveal the `origin' of the Mad...
Published 3 months ago by No More Mr. Mice Guy

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2.0 out of 5 stars Just skip this one, it's terrible
This one was really boring. To get the good out of the way before I start the review proper, the art is fine but not revolutionary, the dialogue is fine and the writing flows.

Now for the story which is the reason anyone would buy this. It is just bad and most of it comes down to The Mad Hatter. He is just not a good villain. His entire motivation is about...
Published 1 day ago by wilf.nelson


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mad Hatter finally comes of age in the Batman's rogues' gallery, 20 May 2014
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
The story running through issue #16-21 of the New 52's Batman - The Dark Knight is collected, along with Annual #1, as Batman The Dark Knight Volume 3: Mad (The New 52). This time it is the Mad Hatter's turn to be dissected in this six-issue story (the Annual is unconnected). The six excellently-scripted and illustrated chapters gradualy reveal the `origin' of the Mad Hatter through a series of flashbacks to his younger days, as in the here and now he is busy kidnapping scores of Gothamites to populate a reconstruction of his one perfect day with the girl of his childhood dreams, and ruthlessly killing them if they fail to play along with his script. As the Batman works to track him down and figure out what he is up to, Bruce Wayne is has also discovered the girl of his dreams, an Ukrainian concert pianist, who he eventually reveals his identity to in a show of honesty. Well, we all know what happens next, don't we, as the Mad Hatter pounces on her - but not randomly, as the intersection of the two is expertly set up earlier by the mechanics of the plot.

This story is a redevelopment of the Mad Hatter, adding quite a lot to his character and turning him into the equal of the Joker for ruthless insanity, rather than the weird/dirty old man of past stories. We also discover what goes into the tea that he is always drinking, which now has a much more meaningful role in his costumed character.

This is another excellent volume in this Dark Knight series, which is one of the better Batman family titles in the New 52.

The Annual is an excellent Halloween story starring the Penguin, the Mad Hatter and the Scarecrow, as Batman gets the night off for a change.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Just skip this one, it's terrible, 29 Aug 2014
This one was really boring. To get the good out of the way before I start the review proper, the art is fine but not revolutionary, the dialogue is fine and the writing flows.

Now for the story which is the reason anyone would buy this. It is just bad and most of it comes down to The Mad Hatter. He is just not a good villain. His entire motivation is about reliving a perfect day. That is the worst motivation I've come across. After that does he just want to sleep, have a tea party? Mortiarty he is not. It made me not care one bit because all of his actions were so bizarre and insane I couldn't follow. I know he is meant to be mad but all of his actions felt totally unconnected and had no sense so getting an attachment to him as a character was impossible. Secondly he also seems to heavily use the 'let me get close and then jump you' technique to the point you think all his employees would stop falling for it and just kick the midget.

My other issue is that he has very little personality and story. He just makes comments about Alice in wonderland but not in relation to Gotham. With no connection his comments makes no sense and actually feels like very lazy writing to 'sound crazy'.

Finally he kills a lot of characters, some of he cared about a lot in previous slides and while I think this is meant to show his attachment to the past and his mercurial nature but it never feels sensible or even part of any arc past 'ain't he insane'.

The last part of the novel is a one shot where mad hatter, penguin and scarecrow are brought to an abandoned building and scared witless. Spoiler alert, batman summoned them and let their own imagination do the work. But it again doesn't make sense, this is torture and batman only catches villains when they break the law. Batman is not out and out a sadist. Poor writing, stupid plot and frankly shouldn't have existed
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mad Hatter finally comes of age in the Batman's rogues' gallery, 15 Jun 2014
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
The story running through issue #16-21 of the New 52's Batman - The Dark Knight is collected, along with Annual #1, as Batman The Dark Knight Volume 3: Mad (The New 52). This time it is the Mad Hatter's turn to be dissected in this six-issue story (the Annual is unconnected). The six excellently-scripted and illustrated chapters gradualy reveal the `origin' of the Mad Hatter through a series of flashbacks to his younger days, as in the here and now he is busy kidnapping scores of Gothamites to populate a reconstruction of his one perfect day with the girl of his childhood dreams, and ruthlessly killing them if they fail to play along with his script. As the Batman works to track him down and figure out what he is up to, Bruce Wayne is has also discovered the girl of his dreams, an Ukrainian concert pianist, who he eventually reveals his identity to in a show of honesty. Well, we all know what happens next, don't we, as the Mad Hatter pounces on her - but not randomly, as the intersection of the two is expertly set up earlier by the mechanics of the plot.

This story is a redevelopment of the Mad Hatter, adding quite a lot to his character and turning him into the equal of the Joker for ruthless insanity, rather than the weird/dirty old man of past stories. We also discover what goes into the tea that he is always drinking, which now has a much more meaningful role in his costumed character.

This is another excellent volume in this Dark Knight series, which is one of the better Batman family titles in the New 52.

The Annual is an excellent Halloween story starring the Penguin, the Mad Hatter and the Scarecrow, as Batman gets the night off for a change.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mad Hatter returns!, 5 Mar 2014
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Yes - I knew I’d find a good New 52 book eventually! And, after trawling through what seems like an endless array of crap, I’ve found a really good New 52 book in The Dark Knight Volume 3: Mad.

I’ve never been sure what The Dark Knight was supposed to be about. Batman is the superhero comic, Detective Comics is the crime/mystery title, Dark Knight is…? Going by the first volume, Knight Terrors, I’d say it was the super-pervy Batman book but thankfully Paul Jenkins and David Finch have exited and taken their deplorable White Rabbit character with them. Gregg Hurwitz and Ethan Van Sciver have stepped in though the Alice in Wonderland theme still persists. So Dark Knight is the psychological horror/warped Alice in Wonderland Batman book apparently.

Volume 3 is about Jervis Tetch, the Mad Hatter. Hurwitz explores his tragic past and how he became an insane Wonderland cosplayer really well as Jervis tries to re-enact a perfect day he had as a kid with a girl called Alice. His stunted growth led to him using experimental hormones in a desperate attempt to be as tall as the other boys and have Alice fall in love with him. The side-effect that probably wouldn’t happen, happened, and drove poor Jervis mad. Couple that with his father’s profession as a haberdasher, his pet white rabbit, and the Wonderland theme-park where he spent his perfect day and you’ve got the makings of the Mad Hatter.

I liked that Hurwitz added the detail of the various teas that Jervis drinks altering him in different ways. A roid-esque tea makes him temporarily strong, enabling him to get in a good hit to Batman with his cane, while other teas can make him see what he wants to see, or slow down Batman and cause him to hallucinate. The teas play to the character while also making him more of a threat to Batman.

But no matter what, Jervis will never really be a threat to Batman, physical or otherwise. So if he can’t threaten Batman, who’s next? Gotham. This book shows how dangerous Mad Hatter can be to Gotham City when he’s let loose with his mind control hats en masse. There’s a nightmarish scene where hundreds of bodies are floating in the Gotham river that surprisingly underlines Hatter’s insanity and menace to ordinary people.

Where the book falls down is when Bruce falls in love for the umpteenth time and decides to reveal his secret identity to this new love, a concert pianist. This never goes well for the girl and, predictably, doesn’t go well here either. Her inclusion in the story felt arbitrary and dull at best and was the only real let-down of the book. Hurwitz needed more of a link between Batman and Hatter so he created this poor woman to be that connection for this book only. That and the fact that Batman doesn’t notice all the hat stalls that crop up across Gotham, as Hatter distributes thousands of his mind-control hats to the population were the only big flaws in the book. Batman’s faced Jervis before, he should recognise his MO straight off!

After the main storyline ends, the book closes with a one-shot story of Penguin, Mad Hatter and Scarecrow being tricked into going to the Arkham Children’s Facility on Hallowe’en, wandering the halls at night scaring themselves silly. It’s a funny and inventive tale that shows the extent of Batman’s ingenuity and understanding of his rogues.

Gregg Hurwitz has done something I didn’t expect with the third volume in The Dark Knight series and written a brilliant Mad Hatter story! He seems to have a knack for writing excellent Batman villain books like 2012’s The Penguin: Pain and Prejudice mini-series, which is also worth a look. The Dark Knight, Volume 3 is a really good Batman book and one of the few New 52 volumes that doesn’t suck!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid if very dark bat book, 11 Feb 2014
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It seems the new 52 'Dark Knight' Batman series is focusing more in encounters between Batman and the big villains of the Batmanverse, with a more adult horror based story style.

"Mad" sees the Batman take on the Mad Hatter, an diminutive 'Alice in Wonderland' obsessed villain with a penchant for mind controlling hats. As I've mentioned this series gives much darker more horrific takes on the villains, the Hatter here is no longer a pantomime villain with a novelty hat fetish, he's a psychopathic killer acting out fantasies of a once remembered doomed romance with Alice in Wonderland overtones.

Despite the much much darker tone, the writing does well to inject some humour and self awareness into the story, riffing on Batmans famous ability to dispensary whenever Jim Gordon turns his back we see Batman taken aback when one of the generic goons tells him the medical impact of the bat beatings handed out.

Overall a darker book with a more grim and gritty universe, a far cry from the golden age. Some credit has to be given for making a villain I've previously thought of as a little silly into a real monster. I'm hoping this series won't turn into a one trick pony making all the traditional bat-foes into serial killing psychos. At the moment this is a very solid series for Bat fans and I recommend, if not for younger readers.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent condition and came quick!!, 27 Mar 2014
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cant wait to read all 3 of them!! the books look great!! great art and story! excited is not the word!
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4.0 out of 5 stars New 52 is the New Awesome!, 28 July 2014
By 
Mr. J. T. Gee (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Batman - The Dark Knight Vol. 3: Mad (The New 52) (Kindle Edition)
Good book, New 52 Batman rules!!!!
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