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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Film
I remember when I went to the cinema to watch this when it first came out; I was absolutely blown away by it, Tom Hanks pulled of an amazing performance as well as Emma Thompson. Not enough credit has been given to this film which is such a shame. I highly recommend this,
Published 1 month ago by index

versus
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shame.
No Extras, expected nowadays.I have purchased many DVDs and they all have had numerous extras.Despatch and quality was excellent. Than you.
Published 18 days ago by T.J. Gardener


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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Film, 7 Mar 2014
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
I remember when I went to the cinema to watch this when it first came out; I was absolutely blown away by it, Tom Hanks pulled of an amazing performance as well as Emma Thompson. Not enough credit has been given to this film which is such a shame. I highly recommend this,
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Praise Emma Thompson!, 22 Mar 2014
By 
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
I thought that Emma Thompson, portraying Pamela Travers, author of my beloved "Mary Poppins" was an absolute delight. Thompson can easily take the audience along with her in an Oscar-worthy performance, as she shows us Travers' metamorphosis from disgruntled stiff-lipped Brit to kite flying dreamer. The rest of the cast don't disappoint: Tom Hanks paints a masterly portrait of Walt Disney, with a team of visionary animators, all trying to persuade Pamela Travers to give her approval (and rights) for Mary's reincarnation on the blue screen.

On the verge of poverty, Pamela Travers cannot really refuse Disney, even though he stands for all she hates, and she fears to lose her beloved Mary to "silly cartoons". This is a Disney production, so we don't get to see any of the Mr Disney's controlling tendencies and darkness, he is simply this benevolent visionary who promised his girls to bring Mary Poppins to life. It's Pamela who gets to have all the issues - daddy issues, first and foremost. Colin Farrell is well cast as Traver's beloved alcoholic Aussie dad - sweet and carefree, full of tales for his little girls, but not enough order to keep down a job, he is full of his personal demons. And Rachel Griffiths convincingly plays the super efficient great-aunt who comes to the aid of the Travers family - and her character is instantly recognisable as a real Mary Poppins in young Pamela Travers life, down to the big black umbrella.

All in all, a good thoughtful film (not really for kids), but it's Emma Thompson who steals the show.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...I Have Final Say!" - Saving Mr. Banks on BLU RAY, 10 April 2014
By 
Mark Barry (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
It's 1906 in the beautiful and affluent city of Maryborough in Australia. Travers and Margaret Goff are leaving with their two daughters - Ginty and Dolly. Like Pied Piper their jokey father is leading his family to a new home, a new town, a new job in a bank for him and supposedly - a new and happier life. But the nanny who watches them leave yet another nice home and wife Margaret with an infant in her arms seems not so sure. And on the train to a remote place called Allora in Queensland (the last stop on the line) - Margaret watches with concern as her husband Travers sips slyly from a hip flask filled with whiskey. So while Ginty may adore her story-telling Dad who fills her with magic thoughts - she just stands on the back of the train dreamily watching everything she's ever known disappear into the distance because of Daddy's "ways"...

Now its April 1961 in London and the child Ginty is grown up into the frightfully prim and prig Pamela L. Travers - author of "Mary Poppins" - sat alone at her desk meditating (as per the works of George I. Gurdjieff). A ring at the front door brings in her literary agent Diarmuid Russell (Ronan Vibert) who informs her that the royalties have dried up and because she refuses to write anything new - soon even her beloved Bloomsbury home will go unless she procures money. But still she's staggeringly prickly. Russell who has tread lightly long enough rages that Walt Disney - who has pursued her for twenty years to get the film rights to "Mary Poppins" - has even agreed to her excessive demands - no animation and full script approval. But she lives in terror that Hollywood will turn her beloved creation into pap.

But needs must - so - soon she's on a BOAC jet to Los Angeles being rude to air hostesses, mothers with children and even the driver who picks her up at the other end - Ralph (a fabulous show by Paul Giamatti). "It smells like chlorine and sweat!" she says as Ralph tells her the scent in the Californian air is Jasmine. He buckles up - it's going to be a bumpy ride. Mrs. Travers then throws pears out of her hotel window, growls at the writers in the Disney studios, whinges about piddly details like numbers on doors and moustaches and says "No! No! No!" absolutely all of the time. She's even truculent in the face of the legendary Walt Disney and his considerable charm.

"Saving Mr. Banks" uses the technique of running Ginty's 1906 childhood in Australia alongside her 1961 Californian battle with Disney and his people - so we slowly get to see why the dreamy hopeful child grows into a woman who would pen such a prig and proper character. Key to all of this is her relationship with the man she worshipped - Travers - her father. His daily battle with drink made his wife attempt suicide in a lake - lost him his job and health (consumption) - and eventually saw the kids farmed out to a visiting matriarch - Aunt Ellie. And with her starched almost churchlike garments, large carpetbag, face-shaped umbrella and 'no nonsense' practicality in the face of a crisis - Aunt Ellie would of course become the character "Mary Poppins". But is Mary Poppins about her saving the children - or is it really about Ginty saving her father through fiction?

The superb cast includes Ruth Wilson as Margaret Travers, BJ Novak and Jason Schwartzman as the composing brothers Robert and Richard Sherman and Bradley Whitford as Disney man Don DaGradi. But the movie belongs to the leads... Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson.

There's a strong body of evidence ("Castaway", "Charlie Wilson's War", "Cloud Atlas" and "Captain Phillips") that Tom Hanks may indeed be up there with De Niro, Al Pacino, Liam Neeson, Paul Giamatti, Philip Seymour Hoffman and other greats in terms of being the best actor who's ever lived. So it takes serious boots to outshine him as Walt Disney. Up steps such a force of nature - Engerland's Emma Thompson - giving her hateful bully lady a beating heart and gradually unfolding the real reasons for her guarded and prickly nature. Thompson gives a performance of true brilliance - an embattled woman who is hurting so deeply that you literally ache for her - cherishing dreams she cannot have sullied by commerce and gaudiness. The dances between her and Hanks are fabulous - but even better is her work with Giamatti - the humble limousine driver who touches her heart and makes her offer up a rare morsel of kindness when he reveals he has a special needs daughter ("tell your daughter she can do anything she puts her mind too...").

Credit also has to go Colin Farrell who is magnificent and measured as the troubled yet adoring father Travers. The scenes between him and Annie Rose Buckley as young Ginty are beautiful and immensely moving. Childlike and wondrous himself - he instils in his little girl the qualities that would make her such a great writer later on. But he also crippled her mind with images of innocence betrayed - and a helpless descent into loss that would haunt her for the rest of her life.

Thomas Newman's perfectly complimentary music and the presence of those wonderfully uplifting movie songs that are lingering in the back of our consciousness give the whole film warmth that's tangible. But what really gets you over and over again - is the astonishing and truly immersive attention to period detail. The look of the bank Travers works in Allora, the huge wooden house on a hill in the middle of nowhere, the fun-fair day where he makes a fool of himself in front of his family because he's drunk... Then there's the Beverly Hills Hotel where Pamela stays in 1961 - the Disney gift hampers she encounters in her room - even the stationery that Giamatti is holding when he meets her at the airport - all of it is period and absolutely spot on. There's a scene where Walt takes Travers to Disneyland in an effort to soften her up - the stalls outside the theme park gates - the public crowds walking by the attractions and the carousel that ends up in the movie - huge set pieces - and all of it perfect.

The BLU RAY print is glorious throughout - a big Hollywood production and the picture quality reflects that. It's defaulted to 2.34:1 so there are bars top and bottom - but even extended to Full Aspect - the print is gorgeous. This film is a real looker on the format. Audio is English 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio with English 2.0 - Subtitles are English for The Hard Of Hearing, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and Finnish - and the Extras include "Deleted Scenes", "The Walt Disney Studios: From Poppins To The Present" and "Let's Go Fly A Kite".

And on it goes to P. L. Travers finally sat in a cinema with tears rolling down her face as Walt Disney gives her Mister Banks the joy he so lacked all those years ago in Australia. Even Dick Van Dyke's awful accent is forgiven as the joy of the songs and the film transcends everything.

"Wind's in the east...mist coming in...like something is brewing...about to begin..."

"Saving Mr. Banks" is beautifully crafted cinema - superbly written by Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith and Directed by John Lee Hancock.

Do yourself a favour and spend Tuppence on this quality movie...
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64 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pears...., 6 Dec 2013
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
Walt Disney's daughters begged him to make a movie of their favourite book, P.L. Travers' "Mary Poppins," so he promised them he would.

In his quest to obtain the rights, he comes up against a writer who has absolutely no intention of letting her beloved creation get ruined by Hollywood. But, as the money grows short, Travers reluctantly agrees to meet and hear Disney's plans for the adaptation.

Walt pulls out all the stops. Armed with imaginative storyboards and songs, he launches an onslaught on P.L. Travers, but she doesn't budge.

But Walt discovers the truth about Mary Poppins, and together they set her free.....

Brilliant is one word to describe this movie, and it's all thanks to Thompson. Her portrayal of Travers is wonderfully complex. At once, you see a meddling Battleaxe, but at the same time, you see a child begging to come to the surface, and you cannot help but like her, despite her little outbursts.

Hanks knows he's not going to outshine Thompson, so he is wonderfully restraint as the big man, and it's to his credit, he's a joy to watch too.

Its funny and equally heartbreaking in parts, and the best parts of the film are set in Austrailia, these set the foundations of the narrative, and really add gravitas to the Disney scenes, honestly, this is Farrell's career best performance, even if he does seem to be channelling Johnny Depp on occasion.

If you are a fan of Mary Poppins, this is a must, and if your not, it's still a fascinating insight into one woman's love of her work, and how much it means to her.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A magnificently sentimental story that prompted audible sobbing in the theatre, 3 Jan 2014
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
As always, no spoilers whatsoever in this review because that's just plain inconsiderate.

Saving Mr. Banks is a dual narrative portrait of the author of Mary Poppins and the creative team at Walt Disney that worked to bring it to the big screen. In one thread (1961) we have the curmudgeonly author behaving like a stark raving... well, curmudgeon as she tries to exert control over the creative process. In the other thread (1906, Australia) we unwind the story of her grim childhood that makes her a curmudgeon in the first place.

This movie has a lot of things to say not the least of which is to cast an entirely different light that beloved American classic of childhood. Mary Poppins ain't quite what you think it's about as a kid (but then what good movie IS what you think it's about when you're a kid). It's also a powerful demonstration of how our childhood influences us as adults sometimes in ways that we don't quite grasp until we look back on them from a great distance.

It's also interesting to see behind the curtain of the creative process. Avoiding spoilers, the author's primary objection is that Mary Poppins and the Banks family have become, in truth, her family over the years and sharing that vision and letting someone else have a piece of them is frightfully difficult. It does make a person wonder if all authors have this same struggle when crossing mediums.

Lastly, I'm a sucker for sentiment but this movie had the audience blowing its nose and audibly sniffing for a good hour. It's an incredibly intimate portrait. However, the kids won't think much of it and the group in the theatre with me was 50+ for the most part. All that said, highly recommended for anyone with a sentimental streak. Best movie I've seen in a month or more.

PS: The patient who sit through the credits will be treated to some photos from the movie's production and a section of the recorded conversations between the author and the production cast.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 4 April 2014
By 
T. Hatchman "tina-Niko-Hatchman" (Kent UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
This movie is a true work of art. Light hearted with a feel good factor. Loved it from start to finish. This will please young and old alike.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saving Mr. Banks, 2 April 2014
This review is from: Saving Mr. Banks (DVD)
Love this movie, gripped from beginning to end, acting abilities from Emma Thompson and Colin Farrell Fantastic, also cried twice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Emotionally uplifting!, 2 April 2014
This review is from: Saving Mr. Banks (DVD)
Inspiring, sad and uplifting all rolled in to one! This is an easy watch film which is probably even more enjoyable if you are familiar with Mary Poppins. Perfect!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The unstoppable force meets the immovable object., 31 Mar 2014
By 
L O'connor (richmond, surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Saving Mr Banks [DVD] (DVD)
An engrossing film about Walt Disney's struggle to persuade P.L. Travers to let him make a film of 'Mary Poppins'. Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks are superb as Travers and Disney. Despite the fact that Travers was obviously an extremely difficult woman my sympathies are, on the whole, with her. Disney's film is marvellous in its way, but his Mary Poppins is not Travers's, and it is understandable that she didn't really want the character she loved moulded in the Disney image. But his patient and untiring struggle to get Travers to let him have his way is fascinating to watch.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous trip down memory lane, 30 Mar 2014
Adored Mary poppins as a child, this film brought back great memories. Emma Thompson is brilliant, fantastic cutting dialogue. Very funny
Tom hanks amazing as Walt Disney.
Basically loved it!
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Saving Mr Banks [DVD]
Saving Mr Banks [DVD] by Tom Hanks (DVD - 2014)
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