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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greta gaming headset
Introduction

I’ll admit I’ve not had much previous experience with Sennheiser. Well, none really apart from when I was on holiday in Vegas. We had a helicopter tour over the Grand Canyon and the headsets we wore were made by Sennheiser. I could not tell you what model they were, but they were of a high quality and did an amazing job of blocking out...
Published 5 months ago by Andrew

versus
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good quality but expensive, issues with bass
This has been a difficult review to do since everywhere I have read, the Sennheiser Game Zero is concluded to be the top of the pile for gaming headphones, and the only downside is price (something which most reviews downplay as `if you are buying these, then cost is not a concern').

However, I have ignored every such review and gone by my own results, which...
Published 8 months ago by M. Bhangal


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greta gaming headset, 23 Aug. 2014
By 
Andrew "impulsive gadget buyer" - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
Introduction

I’ll admit I’ve not had much previous experience with Sennheiser. Well, none really apart from when I was on holiday in Vegas. We had a helicopter tour over the Grand Canyon and the headsets we wore were made by Sennheiser. I could not tell you what model they were, but they were of a high quality and did an amazing job of blocking out the noise of the helicopter and allowing myself and the captain to talk to each other. So as you can imagine when I went to a computer trade show and saw that Sennheiser had a stand, I was keen to have a chat with them. They told me they were developing headsets for gamers, and it certainly looks like they have with their G4ME ZERO headsets. As soon as I opened the box I knew that these were premium headphones and should deliver the best in mic and audio quality.

What are Sennheiser all about? (from Sennheiser)

Discover true sound
For more than 65 years our name has stood for top-quality products, true sound and tailor-made solutions for every aspect of recording, transmission and reproduction of sound. We want people to not only hear all aspects of sound, but also to feel it, too. With German engineering, decades of experience in professional business, and innovative science, we stay true to the sound and set new standards for headphones, headsets, microphones, and integrated systems.

Being a fan of many online computer games, I am no stranger to headsets. My wife would go crazy if she had to listen to me and all of the related gaming noise. I have never really spent much money on headphones, normally going for un- branded, sub £20 headphones. I was under the impression that they all sound the same so why spend the money on expensive headphones. To spend even £100 let alone £199.99 on headphones was just something that I had never thought about. So when the G4ME headset arrived on my desk I was keen to try them out, and I haven’t thought twice about using any others since.

Overview
Firstly let’s take a look at the headset, what it features and what Sennheiser have to say about it.
“Gaming Headset for PC & Mac G4ME ZERO BLACK featuring Sennheiser’s “Ergonomic Acoustic Refinement” technology, the G4ME ZERO delivers the ultimate in sonic accuracy and clarity. The updated closed design provided by the custom-made painted steel ear cup grids lets you hear even the faintest detail of your game.”

Supreme Comfort
Introducing a new era for professional gaming headsets.
“With G4ME ZERO we have gone back to where we started and completely rethought the concept of comfort for gaming. Our aim was to design the most comfortable and best sounding closed professional headset on the market. We think we’ve done just that.”
So with all that in mind let’s have a look at the G4ME ZERO headset and see if it lives up to its name.

What do you get?
One of the first things that you notice with just the box in your hands is how premium it looks. The packaging is well constructed and contains the premium look to the graphics and design of it. On the back of the box you will find the specifications for the headphones and upon opening, you will see the headset tucked neatly away in its carry case.

Features
• TAILORED EAR PADS- the first ever gaming headset to feature multiple layers of fitted ear padding.
• SENNHEISER TRANSDUCER TECHNOLOGY- extreme clarity and accurate, developed at our own labs.
• "ERGONOMIC ACOUSTIC REFINEMENT"- Sennheiser technology delivers ultimate sonic accuracy and clarity by channelling signals directly into your ears.
• XXL EAR PADS- Plenty of space around your ears for best fit and comfort.
• NOISE-CANCELING MICROPHONE- Professional-grade noise-cancelling microphone with intuitive mute function.
• CLOSED DESIGN- The closed design blocks out all outside noise allowing you to focus on your game.

Specifications
• Headset and Microphone
• COLOR black (Article No. 506079)
• COLOR white (Article No. 506064)
• WEARING STYLE Headband
• IMPEDANCE Headphones: 150 Ω
• CONNECTOR 2 x 3.5 mm for desktop/laptop
• FREQUENCY RESPONSE (MICROPHONE) Microphone: 50 Hz - 16,000 Hz
• FREQUENCY RESPONSE (HEADPHONES) Headphones: 10 Hz – 26.000 Hz
• SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL (SPL) Headphones: 108 dB
• THD, TOTAL HARMONIC DISTORTION Headphones: < 0.1%
• EAR COUPLING Headphones: around-the-ear, closed acoustic design
• CABLE LENGTH 3 m
• WEIGHT 312 g
• PICK-UP PATTERN Microphone: Noise Cancelling
• SENSITIVITY Microphone: -38 dBV at 94 dBSPL

The Headset
With the headset out of the box and in your hands, the first thing you will notice is their light weight and feel. The headset feels really sturdy and looks like it would stand the test of time through many hours of gaming and playing music. One of the many features is its travel friendly design which allows you to fold the headset away for storing when not in use or for travel to LAN parties etc. The included hard case is a godsend and allows the headset to be safely stored when not in use. Connecting the G4ME ZERO to your computer is so simple with just a pair of 3.5mm connectors- one for the headphone and one for the microphone. Just plug them into your sound card and you are away. You can use the headset on other devices but you will need an adaptor that isn’t included.

The cable is made from a really high quality braided material and is around 3m in length. It is extremely flexible and I found that it did not get in the way. I would have to say that the headphones are the most comfortable headset that I have ever worn, lightly pressing against your head and covering your entire ear. I found that they stay securely in place with little movement at all. I was expecting the headset to feel heavier than it actually is and feel Sennheiser really have got the right balance here with the overall weight. The G4ME ZERO features a new ear pad design that they have developed for their professional pilot headphones. The ear pads are made with thick leatherette and triple layered memory foam. The case of the ear pads are thicker to ensure that the headset closes all around the ear. I found that this prevents the sound from escaping.

The controls on the headset are well placed with a volume control on the right ear cup- I feel that this works much better, rather than placing the control on the actual cable itself. The microphone features a convenient mute function as well where you just lift the boom in the air and you’re off air.

Microphone
The microphone is a flip down boom located on the left ear-cup. Flipping it down activates the mic and vice versa turns it off. I tested the mic through Skype calls as well as game play, and even read some of The Hobbit book so I could hear for myself the amazing mic quality.

The sound is crystal clear and as mentioned before is totally out of this world. I will never again buy un-branded, cheap headphones. The headphones during game play really give you the edge, allowing you to hear all of that minute game detail and sound effects that I just cannot hear with my normal headphones. The sound was totally immersive but not overwhelming. Playing music was on a really different level and having tested the headphones with a great range of music, I was really impressed.
I think what really sets this headset apart is just how well it behaves when listening to movies and playing music. Maybe you would not necessarily spend so much money on this headset unless you were a gamer, but it does fit the bill for movies and music as well, and I definitely think it is worth the expense.

Conclusion
I have found reviewing this headset highly interesting. The G4ME ZERO headset is a fantastic gaming headset and with a price of £199.99, you would not expect anything less. Spending this type of money on a headset really buys you the very best that money can buy. I do feel that the price is little high, but you are also paying for the Sennheiser brand and design. I would like to see maybe a 3 year warranty on a pair of head phones that cost as much as £199.99. In terms of quality, I would recommend these to anyone and the extra expense is certainly worth the results.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sennheiser never disappoint, 10 Nov. 2014
By 
Silvester (Sheffield, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
The sound quality is absolutely awesome, I am struggling to hear sound outside the headset which is fantastic. The sound dial is a little small but it's great to have it on the headset and not on a cord. Mic comes through very clear. Cups and padding are very soft and it encloses my ears perfectly without causing too much overheating.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I think these are a fantastic buy. They do a great job of isolating ..., 19 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I think these are a fantastic buy. They do a great job of isolating you (You will not hear your wife/ partner / parent - which may be a good or bad thing depending on your point of view).

Sound quality is good, though maybe lacking a little mid range. The mic works very well, and i like the mute function (raise the boom).

There's an on-ear rotary volume dial, and it has a very long cable.

I also find them incredibly comfortable - they are very lightweight compared to other "high - end" gaming headsets, and although you get warm ears, I haven't found it uncomfortable.

If the mic boom was detachable I'd have given 5 stars
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good in all departments other than price, 20 Mar. 2014
By 
mr_ska (London, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Sennheiser know how to pull out all the stops when they want to, and for the G4ME ZERO headset they pretty much have. The headset comes packaged in a very nice box, with a luxurious travel case included in case you like to keep things tidy if you travel to LAN events and so on. Because yes, this headset is marketed as being for 'pro gamers'.

The headset itself is well thought out and well constructed. The ear cups are large enough to fit right around the ears and form a seal against your skin which significantly reduces outside noise, but as a trade off will give you the same kind of experience of hearing your own voice that you get when talking under water. The most obvious result is that you will likely find yourself talking a bit louder than you might otherwise do. Perhaps surprisingly I found that the headset was perfectly fine to use when wearing glasses. The earcup seal still occurred but there wasn't any sense of squashing the glasses frame into the sides of my head. That's a very big plus point. A rotary volume control is located on the outside of the right earcup. The microphone is perfectly fine for the job, and can be adjusted for best placement easily enough. Pushing the mic boom into the upward position mutes the mic, which is a useful feature.

So far so good, but there are a couple of fine details that mark out this headset as above average. The cable is a non-tangle type having a feel a bit like a shoelace and has a velcro strap on it for keeping the cable length adjusted and tidy. Small touches like that show off the thought that has gone in and the attention to detail.

Sound wise, things are fine. It is a gaming headset and it has very obviously been set up to make voice comms clear. Game sounds come over fine as well, with no hyping of the bass end or any excess top end fizzyness. These are not that great for audiophile use though, which is to be expected considering the design and clearly stated intended application.

Some minor niggles. The blurb for the headset is a bit over the top for my tastes. Memory foam in the earcups? Who cares? Foam is foam. As long as they are comfortable I don't care what kind of foam is in them. The frequency response is listed as 10 - 26,000 Hz which is more or less meaningless. The small speakers in headphones are simply not capable of reproducing very low bass frequencies so listing a 'response' down to 10Hz makes me wonder exactly what they mean. Similarly for the top end, you aren't likely to be having much real life use for a supposed headphone 'response' up to 26kHz. But again, I don't much care about what they say about the audio specs, I care about what they are like to use, and in that regard they are perfectly fine and good.

The final thing to consider is how the headset stacks up against the competition. That's a problem. As lovely as this Sennheiser headset is, at the current price of roughly two hundred pounds I am not convinced that it is so lovely that it blows away cheaper models. You can get most of the features and completely acceptable audio and mic quality from a headset that costs as little as twenty pounds if you shop around. One of my regular gaming buddies has been recently using a Gamecom 380 headset for example, and the mic on them is good enough that his voice sounds very clear in game. He tells me that he finds the headset comfortable and the audio quality entirely acceptable for gaming too. So it would be a very good idea to try to test out a bunch of different makes and models if you are in any way price sensitive.

So overall there is much to like about the G4ME ZERO headset. They are well made and high quality. The presentation and style is there and there has obviously been a lot of thought and attention to detail gone in. But despite being very good in every department from comfort to audio quality the high price is a bit of a sticking point. At a more reasonable price point well below two hundred pounds I would not hesitate to give the G4ME ZERO headset five stars but as things stand now it's only the four stars.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good quality but expensive, issues with bass, 20 May 2014
By 
M. Bhangal "S" (Somewhere in Northern England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This has been a difficult review to do since everywhere I have read, the Sennheiser Game Zero is concluded to be the top of the pile for gaming headphones, and the only downside is price (something which most reviews downplay as `if you are buying these, then cost is not a concern').

However, I have ignored every such review and gone by my own results, which are significantly different. I have also NOT ignored cost, and have compared against a number of other headphones on the basis that the Game Zero MUST compete on price against at least one other classic audiophile headphone set, as well as wiping the floor with more standard gaming headphones from the likes of Creative and Logitech.

I have reviewed on the following points:

1. The headphones must be able to handle gaming audio frequency ranges, and in particular be able to bring out explosions without blotting out other sound such as soundtrack and other special effects.

2. Stereo separation should be good enough to give good directional cues.

3. The headphones should be good enough for general audio such as music and occasional sound editing.

4. Usability and look-and feel.

5. Price vs features

I buy new headphones at the same rate most gamers change their graphics cards (!) so am lucky to have a full selection of headphone sets that encompass the available price range, and will compare them to the Game Zero for each of the points above. The line-up includes:

Old, last gen headphones (Creative Fatality). These go for about 20-30 nowadays and are probably the low end quality headphones a serious gamer would consider.

Current gen headphones with audio processing hardware (Logitech G430). These are a traditional two speaker set, but come with a hardware dongle that digitally emulates a 7.1 sound-space. They are a step up from the Fatality, and you are looking at the mid 50s for one now.

Audiophile headphones. The Sennheiser HD25's are a classic. A music industry mainstay, and their lightness and durability makes them very useful for gaming, assuming you can live without the microphone. You can pick them up now for around 100. I would have liked to have tested against the Sennheiser Amperior rather than the HD25 as the former are in the same cost ballpark as the Game Zero, but I don't own the Amperiors.

And of course, finally, the Game Zero.

For all the tests, I am outputting via a Creative SB X-Fi (and am certainly NOT using the motherboard audio to test such an expensive pair of headphones!). I am using a fast gaming rig that is in the top 10% of all PCs according to its 3DMark results (Alienware i7 12 core, recent graphics card, 24GB, dual SSDs, Windows8).

Ok, on with the 5 test areas!

1. Gaming Frequencies.

I tested with Crysis 3. The HD25s produced the best bass, with the Fatality and G430 coming second. I was gobsmacked that the Game Zero came last for bass. On investigation, I found that the Game Zero could be made to sound as good as the HD25s if I pressed the heads down into my ears a fraction. It looks like the foam on the Game Zero lifts the drivers too far away from the ears, and also absorbs some of the bass in the process. However, the Game Zero also uses memory foam, so maybe they will settle with time. If I don't update this point, then assume it's a design fault, and the Game Zero really is not seating properly for optimum sound. However, I must say that one of the major points with top quality headphones is that they must seat properly and consistently. The Fatality headphones also sound deeper when you press them towards your ears, but the G430s do it much less, and the HD25's don't do it at all (and never have).

For the clarity at the high end, the Fatality started showing its true colours: the separation between the bass and highs get a bit muddy when you have explosions going off, and it gets a bit indistinct. The 430 is better, but doesn't go as deep to start off with, and the HD25 and Game Zero are about the same: close to perfection. Proper frequency separation across the board, and no muddiness

The HD25s win, with the Game Zero second because it fails on the low frequencies. G430 third, and the Fatality last.

2. Stereo separation

For this test I used a game that relies a lot on sound for cues (ARMA3). You have to know where the incoming bullets are coming from in a flash, because both the AI and online players are merciless!

I thought the G430s, with their emulated 7.1 would win this but even though they are stereo only, the Game Zero really shows its quality on this one: stereo separation is excellent and far beyond the others. The Fataility was too muddy, the HD25s were good and probably as good as it gets for traditional non-gaming headphones, but I think they miss out a little on the extended sound-scape that gaming audio requires. A better result for the Game Zero: an easy first place.

3. General Audio and occasional sound editing.

For this, I listened via Spotify on both my gaming rig and a decent laptop (Sony Vaio i7 in the office at work), and also used my gaming rig for video editing using Adobe Premiere CC. Without a doubt, I expected the HD25s to win, and the Fatality and G430 to be no hopers in comparison (which was the case). The issue was how close the Game Zero came to the HD25s: the HD25 is practically an industry standard for DJing and audio production, so how close do the Game Zero come to them?

Well, pretty close, but the bass issue reared its head again. The Game zero just doesn't sit well enough to pass bass properly to the ear unless you press the cups down, so it comes second to the HD25.

Special mention comes for the G430s, which exhibit a slight crackle at times from the hardware dongle (typical Creative: great hardware, occasionally suspect software!), so for the discerning audiophile, they probably fail overall. Incidentally, they also seem to crackle a bit for certain very specific games. It's down to the hardware dongle (remove that and the headphones don't crackle).

4. Usability and look-and-feel.

Let's be honest here: the Game Zero oozes quality, and looks good packed in its dedicated hard molded carrying case. Once you take them out and are wearing them though, I think the G430s actually look the best, with the Fatality looking its age, and the HD25s looking a little cheap and fragile (although looks can be deceptive - the HD25s last forever, I've had mine since 2007 and not a mark!).

In terms of wearability, it is between the Game Zero and HD25s, with the G430 coming a close second.

For durability, I expected the same from the Game Zero as I got from the HD25s. The HD25s are built to last, and every part is replaceable and the whole thing can be taken apart into its separate pieces: it has no `design life' - its all replaceable and built to last longer than you do! None of the others look to be in the same league, although the Game Zero comes closest.

One really cool thing about the Game zero is that it has a easy to get at volume dial on the right speaker cup. The Fatality and G430 both have the volume on the wire, but that decision seems backward and archaic once you use the Game Zero.

The Game Zero also has the ability to turn the mic off simply by retracting it upwards (a feature shared with the G430, the HD25 doesn't have a mic, and for the Fatality you have to physically unplug the mic to turn it off).

One negative about the Game Zero is that it comes with dual 3.5 inch jacks only (one for audio, one for mic). These are standard connectors for desktop/laptop computers, but not compatible with some consoles without an adapter - which you don't get in the package. So the Game Zero is aimed at computers rather than consoles (but then, the headphones cost as much as a console!).

5. Price vs Features.

For the price, I would expect the Game Zero to beat the HD25 for everything except perhaps the 'General Audio' test, where it would have to come a very close second. The Game Zero fails on bass, so doesn't meet this high expectation. Short and sweet result on this one, and a bit of a downer for the Game Zero.

So to conclude

The Fatality is a surprisingly good set of headphones. Pretty good in everything, but sound is a little muddy so they have to be discounted for the discerning gaming audiophile. The G430s are an average pair of headphones bolstered by a clever hardware dongle that makes them sound very good. Remove the dongle and the G430s are worse than the Fatality (incidentally, use the G430 dongle with the HD25, and.... well, I'll leave that joy for anyone who has both systems to try out!). The G430s suffer from slight crackling on some games though, so for gaming audio perfection, they also fail.

The HD25s would make perfect gaming headphones notwithstanding the audiophile stereo separation (which isn't quite as wide as dedicated gaming headphones such as the G430 and Game Zero) and they don't have a mic attached. They have to be discounted for online gaming simply on their physical lack of the mic. They're good for occasional single player gaming though if your main focus is video/sound authoring and music, and would therefore satisfy a very particular gaming audiophile: one who enjoys single player and/or doesn't use a mic for teamspeak.

Sadly, I have to conclude that the Game Zero is not worth the money because the as-tested copy I have just doesn't beat the HD25s often enough, which they should given they cost x2 as much. The Game Zero doesn't cut it because it appears to have a design flaw when it should have no issues whatsoever *from day one* given it is the most expensive headphone set you can buy.

What isn't good enough? The sound drivers are certainly good enough (at least as good as the HD25), but the headphones just don't seat correctly on the head to get the bass to your ears. If you press the headphones just a touch to your head, the bass suddenly opens up and you get something closer to a `gaming version of the HD25 - slightly more emphasis on bass and wider stereo image, but otherwise clearly a device with the same audio quality. But you can't stay pressing in the headphones like that for normal use. So, either the Game Zero memory foam needs a while to `burn-in' to the user's contours, or it just isn't physically configured properly.

As I said, this was a difficult review to write. Every web review I see doesn't seem to note the issue with the Game Zero seating and subsequent bass issue. Maybe its just my copy, or the memory foam needs to burn in, or I have a really really big head, or I'm being overly picky, but as of this writing, this is my conclusion. 2 stars off for the bass issue on what would otherwise be 'a gaming version of the classic HD25'.

I'll certainly update the review if things improve (I intend to use the Game Zero exclusively for a couple of months following this review, but if I don't update this conclusion, assume this is my final view).

Thanks for getting to the end of a pretty long review, and good luck with your buying decision. If you have any questions add a comment and I'll do my best to answer.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars G4ME ZERO: Excellent, 24 Feb. 2014
By 
Alien937 (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The build quality of the G4ME ZERO is, as you might expect from Sennheiser, excellent. It feels like a pricey item, which unfortunately it is. I really like the black and white (with the occasional shiny red) colour scheme and the included carrying case, two things that are relatively unusual for a gaming headset. It's very comfortable to wear, with padded ear cushions and headband. The earcups are a great size and shape. You could wear this set for hours without batting an eyelid.

The G4ME ZERO has a closed-back design (as opposed to the open style of the Sennheiser G4ME ONE PC Gaming Headset) and is a noise-cancelling (or "noise-blocking" as Sennheiser terms it) headset. The earcups form an acoustic seal against your head, and do their best to block out unwanted noise from outside. The set is unpowered, so this noise-cancellation is carried out passively. Closed-back headphones often don't sound as good as open-backed ones, but the G4ME ZERO sounds great. It also has the benefit of not bleeding sound as much as an open-backed set would. The microphone works well and has a nice auto-mute feature - just push the boom mic upwards and it mutes.

It's hard to fault the G4ME ZERO. It's well-built, comfortable and sounds great. For gaming in a noisy household or while out and about it's excellent. The only bad thing about it is the price.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not good enough, 6 July 2014
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
Well for the price they have great comfort but they only work on PC for an extra 50 euro I would go with the Astro A50's as they work on the new consoles as well as PC.
Sound is very good on these cans but again the Astros are a little better.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellence..., 24 Jun. 2014
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
At the time of this review, these were priced at £200. That is a lot of money for a headset, particularly ones specialized for gaming. For gaming purposes there are several things necessary:

1. all environmental sounds must be clear (or as the game designers intended)
2. bass must be capable of reproducing deep rumbling and explosions
3. 3D audio - user must be able to pinpoint direction of sounds (like when being shot at)
4. must be comfortable for 4hrs+ of constant use
5. mic must be of good quality with no feedback of game sounds

Here's how this headset measures up:

1. I tested using Amnesia 1+2, the Thief series, Battlefield 3, and the GTR series. Results were excellent; the scraping of metal on stone, footsteps in gravel, bullets whizzing by, steam hissing from pipes, gears and clockwork, sound of multiple car engines, all were completely clear and more realistic than ever before. I have no complaints in this department, the clarity at mid - high frequencies is excellent. Five stars
2. tested bass with BF3, Call of Duty series. The thuds of distant impacts, rumble of a building collapse, of armoured vehicles driving past. This wasn't as excellent as the higher frequencies; it is still very good, but I have heard equally good on other headphones. It is, however, consistent, with little distortion ever at 95% volume. Four stars.
3. positionality (is that a word?) is excellent. In Thief (including using the old EAX system) it allows you to tell when someone has walked past an open dorrway, or changed the surface they are walking on. In DayZ/Arma you can tell where bullets are coming from with no problem. Five stars.
4. comfort for me is very important, my ears get hot and sweaty with closed headphones. These are no worse than other high-end sets, and they use memory foam so the seating is comfortable as it can get. They do leak a bit of sound, but I prefer that than a squashed head. Four stars.
5. The mic is clear and well designed. It gives good results with no feedback no matter how loud I set the headphones. I have used better headset mics, but also far worse. Three (and a half) stars.

So overall a great headset, with deep bass, clear treble and 3D, and comfortable as well. As for general use (video, Skype, music) they are very good, although you may have to change your mode settings to get your music sounding 'right'. There is competition at this high price, so as always check out the competition (creative, logitech etc). SImilar quality can be had for a lot less.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Comfortable, with a great microphone, 16 April 2014
By 
Suzy Shipman "suzshi" (Mid Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
They really look great and sound great but they don’t sound amazing which is what I actually expected. The mid and high frequencies were great but I felt that the bass was underwhelming.

However these are the some really comfortable gaming head phones, in fact the most comfortable I have ever worn. You can wear them for hours and hours without the usual aches. The external sound suppression is superb. It’s not true noise cancellation but even so these headphones far out perform my previous pair.

The way they fold makes transporting them very handy and they seem quite robust so little worries about breaking them.

The volume control does not cut the sound completely which is a little annoying as due to the sound suppression being so good you have to take them off to hear the outside world in the end.

The microphone is one of its best features in fact it is the best and clearest one I have used to date. Pushing it up mutes it, which is a cleaver feature. However you cannot remove it which is a shame because it would make them more versatile.

In conclusion are they worth the premium price tag (well, I think just about) but if you don’t care about the comfort of the fit or the microphone quality then there are cheaper alternatives. But if you want a very high quality mic and extreme comfort then these are well worth considering.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Worth the pennies., 30 Mar. 2014
By 
S. D. Spicer (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sennheiser G4ME ZERO PC Gaming Over-Ear Headset - White (Personal Computers)
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This is an expensive pair of headphones for what some would regard as 'mere games'. But having used them for a month, not only for games but for listening to music and speech, also as communications I think that they are worth pretty much what you pay for them. Of course there are always going to be cheaper headsets - but if you are going to wear them for a long time then you want: (1) Excellent sound quality and (2) superb comfort. These headphones score highly in both departments.

They are well constructed from plastic and metal with leatherette covering the ear pads that make with the memory foam an effect block to outside sound. They are lightweight enough to wear for extended times and the ear pads didn't irritate. The cable is a cloth-covered non-tangle affair that despite being ignored refused to tangle in any substantial way. My glasses fitted quite happily underneath as well, the memory foam moulding itself around them

The audio quality was good. Bass was clearly defined without being excessive, speech was clear and easy to listen to. People I spoke to said that the sound quality from the inbuilt microphone was equally clear. Typical soundtracks had qualities that I had missed on cheaper headsets and the lack of unwanted background noise and comfort made them a headset I wanted to wear.

They arrive neatly folded into a reasonably substantial travel/storage case - neatly solving the problem of what you are going to do with them when you have finished using them and don't want to leave them lying around. This was a welcome addition.

In the end it boils down to if you think that 200 is too much to spend on headphones. If you do there are many others out there. But if you are happy spending the money on a pair of well-designed headphones from a noble name in audio equipment then I think they are worth pretty much most of the pennies you are going to spend. Recommended.
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