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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Hitchcock
This is the master at his most characteristic, if not quite on his best form. A hugely enjoyable propaganda romp with first rate performances all round (take note of Robert Benchley and Edmund Gwenn in minor roles). The film is a model of economy and for those looking for Hitchcock's visual 'touches' we have the assasin fleeing through a crowd of umbrellas, to quote only...
Published on 16 Dec 2003 by J. Skade

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Subtitle at all
I love the movie, but there are no english subtitles.
I like to watch movies with English subtitles, because sometimes I can't catch up with the dialogue.
Published on 21 April 2012 by johnsteveyap


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Hitchcock, 16 Dec 2003
By 
J. Skade "joeskade" (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This is the master at his most characteristic, if not quite on his best form. A hugely enjoyable propaganda romp with first rate performances all round (take note of Robert Benchley and Edmund Gwenn in minor roles). The film is a model of economy and for those looking for Hitchcock's visual 'touches' we have the assasin fleeing through a crowd of umbrellas, to quote only the most memorable (and in the opening credits, the world becomes an American newspaper building). The plot is poppycock of course, but so what.
The feel, I think is closer to the earlier British films than some of his other Hollywood movies, perhaps because it was propaganda. The rousing speech at the end has obviously lost something over the years but it was there to do a job. Lovely.
The film looks good on DVD, but why no extras?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HOT(EL) EUROPE, 3 Sep 2007
By 
Nobody (London, England) - See all my reviews
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"Foreign Correspondent" (1940) was Alfred Hitchcock's second American film after the fabulous "Rebecca" (1940) and what film it is. It got everything you need for a thriller: Newspaper reporters; espionage; traitors; car chases; plane crashes; sea rescues, romance; war; assassinations; political conspiracies and bell towers, oh and let's not forget windmills. Not only that but cinematography by none other than Rudolph Mate whom serious cinema buffs know as the cinematographer of films like the sublime "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (Dreyer,1928), "Vampyr" (Dreyer,1930); Dodworth (Wyler,1936); Stella Dallas (Vidor,1937) and "To Be Or Not To Be" (Lubitsch,1942) all of which are regarded as classics. "Foreign Correspondent" also has some fine energetic performances from Joel McCrea (Sullivan's Travels, 1941; The Palm Beach Story,1942) and Laraine Day as well as supporting cast of Herbert Marshall, George Sanders and Albert Basserman. The special effects are just remarkable especially the scene at sea which is just impossible to believe was shot in a MGM studio. "Foreign Correspondent" is a fan favourite and without a doubt a thriller masterpiece even German Propaganda minister Goebbels refered to it as "A masterpiece of propaganda, a first-class production". "Foreign Correspondent" opened at cinemas August 16, 1940 just three weeks before the start of the Blitz which is depicted at the end of the film.

The DVD transfer is of a good standard although the soundtrack could be better. There are no extras.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A safe buy, 28 April 2003
By 
Michael Bo (Frederiksberg Denmark) - See all my reviews
The titles of the new Universal Hitchcock edition are very cheap, and evidently the films are not remastered in any way. Some titles, such as 'Suspicion', suffer terribly, others, like this 'Foreign Correspondent', were transferred from serviceable prints, and are therefore wonderful to watch.
'Correspondent' belongs up there among the Hitchcock greats, one of the most virtuosic of cinematographic orchestrations, just watch the long, infernally exciting sequence when the plane is shot down and dives into the sea - riveting! The scenes in the Dutch windmill are vintage Hitchcock, and Joel McCrea proves to be one of the master's most personable of heroes.
The script is wonderful, and one readily 'forgives' the patriotic schmaltz of the finishing line, when McCrea broadcasts his impressions of wartime Europe, as the blitz of London sets in and all lights go out. "Hang on to your lights", he implores his countrymen. "They are the only lights left in the world". Maybe George W. Bush should be persuaded not to watch so many films!
Anyway, this one is a safe buy.
So do it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Subtitle at all, 21 April 2012
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I love the movie, but there are no english subtitles.
I like to watch movies with English subtitles, because sometimes I can't catch up with the dialogue.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor presentation of great film, 21 April 2009
By 
stickinsect (Sydney NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
This is not quite top-notch Hitchcock, but still a great movie. Unfortunately this UK DVD edition contains a mediocre print and no extras. Avoid this at all costs and instead get the US R1 Warner Bros edition which has a better print transfer, and contains the theatrical trailer and a making of documentary "Personal History: Foreign Hitchcock".
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worthy film on an Unworthy disk, 19 April 2003
This 1940 Alfred Hitchcock film has everything you’d expect: Romance, spies, kidknapping, murder, fine acting and great special effects (for the year it was made).
However, this DVD edition has NOTHING in the way of any special features, trailers, or even subtitles. This is not what DVD’s were made for.
No doubt our Region 1 friends will eventually get the attention this movie deserves.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm in love with a girl, and I'm going to help hang her father, 24 Aug 2008
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IWFIcon - See all my reviews
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Another of Hitchcock's "forgotten" classics, few realise that this film was nominated for SIX Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay.

It's certainly difficult, even more than 65 years after it was made, to watch this without one eye on the propaganda "message" of the film, but Hitch's first thought was always towards the entertainment value of his movies. And whilst this may not be a North By Northwest, say, it certainly deserves to be ranked towards the upper echelon of his efforts.

Johnny Jones (or Huntley Havestock if you will) is an American journalist sent to London to eek out a war story for his newspaper. He finds himself battling against mysterious forces after witnessing the apparent assassination of peace activist Van Meer.

Joel McCrea is strong as the eponymous hero of the hour, although he is hampered by some ridiculous flaws within his character, and whilst Laraine Day is good as the love interest Carol Fisher, their romance is perhaps less than believable. Whereas in the 39 Steps you could see why Pamela would fall for Richard Hannay, despite her initial frostiness to his behaviour, it jars just how quickly Fisher starts to believe Jones/Havestock and falls in love with him.

There are some good supporting performances as well, not least Herbert Marshall, as one of Hitchcock's trademark cultured villains, which go a long way to overcoming the few minor problems that exist with the film. Albert Bassermann, despite learning English phonetically for the part, managed to grab a best supporting nomination at the Academy Awards.

Hitch offers up some fantastic set pieces (Van Meer's assassination, the chase to the Windmill and, best of all, the climactic plane crash) and whilst it can be difficult to have much empathy with Huntley Havestock (you will at times feel more sorry for Marshall's villainous but human Stephen Fisher) at it's heart the movie is a rollocking roller-coster ride of action.

Yes it's a bit slow to get going and does perhaps have too many endings (although one can understand the need to clear everything up AND make a fairly direct plea to America in respect of the War that was raging in real life) but these are minor considerations. Whilst there are bettter films in the Hitchcock canon this remains a stong entry and one that is very much worth a couple of hours of your time.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What an ending !, 24 Mar 2006
By 
L. Davidson (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
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"Foreign Correspondent" was made over 65 years ago and ,not surprisingly , it looks a little dated now. The DVD does not appear to have been remastered in any way and the monochrome picture is washed-out looking and too bright.However ,the film itself is surprisingly good. It is a spy thriller set on the eve of the outbreak of WW2 in Europe. An intrepid reporter from a New York newspaper uncovers a European spy ring, whose motives are never quite revealed (a bit like "The Man Who Knew Too Much" in that respect) and many quintessentially Hitchcockian scenes follow as the "Foreign Correspondent" , played by Joel McCrea ,survives several extremely dangerous situations. The best of these are the windmill scene in Holland, the tower scene at Westminster Cathedral and the stunning finale on the clipper plane to America. The acting is quite good in this film and despite the sometimes stilted dialogue and archaic plummy English accents, "Foreign Correspondent" is an enjoyable film to watch.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is one Mystery everyone should own!, 30 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This is my favourite Hitchcock film. It has such a classy script I was I could have directed it just as well. Joel McCrea plays a American newspaper writer who befriends a man who turns out to be important with the process to prevent WW2, he sees him again a few days later and for a very strange reason he does not remeber him maybe because it isn't the same man! But that is enough to give away. It is such classy idea and is a must for any Hitchcock lover!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Read all about it!, 9 April 2014
By 
Steven - See all my reviews
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Hitchcocks second American foray is a romping flag waver echoing themes presented in the 39steps and subesquently followed in Saboteur. The bones of the tale are wrapped in a story about an American reporter sent to cover political upheaval in Europe. He sets about shadowing the leader of a political peace movement and soon discovers it to be a hotbed of fifth columnists hell bent on extracting secret battle plans from the ailing leader. Hitchcocks maguffin is there in that the battle plans (a clause in a treaty) are alluded to but never revealed to the viewer. Trademark cinematography and technical quirks include a chase through a sea of umbarellas and sweeping shots which take the viewer from the skies and into an aeroplane window. This technical tradecraft freshens the familiar feeling created by the story; you know you're watching Hitchcock. Although similar in theme, the tale is less linear than either 39Steps or Saboteur and it feels a tiny bit convolouted because of it. There's more humour in this, there are comedic touches on the sidelines and almost whole characters are portrayed for comic effect. It's part adventure, part propaganda and the plane crash is well handled and exciting considering the era. This has many merits and I really enjoyed it.
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Criterion Collection: Foreign Correspondent [Blu-ray] [1940] [US Import]
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