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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Recommended short book
More than decent overview of campaign, which covers both the politics and strategy behind the campaign as well as the story of the sailors and soldiers involved on frontline.

There may not be anything new in this book, but would recommend to history students and general military enthusiasts.
Published 12 months ago by K. Bradburn

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3.0 out of 5 stars OK Read
Not enough talk about the troops at Company / Battalion level for me but at least the British / Irish contingent got a mention which is pleasing and historically accurate.
Published 7 months ago by MCC


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Recommended short book, 26 Nov 2013
By 
K. Bradburn (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dardanelles: Tragedy and Heroism (Kindle Edition)
More than decent overview of campaign, which covers both the politics and strategy behind the campaign as well as the story of the sailors and soldiers involved on frontline.

There may not be anything new in this book, but would recommend to history students and general military enthusiasts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 3 July 2014
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This review is from: The Dardanelles: Tragedy and Heroism (Kindle Edition)
Factual accounts of actions and mistakes made
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3.0 out of 5 stars OK Read, 9 April 2014
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This review is from: The Dardanelles: Tragedy and Heroism (Kindle Edition)
Not enough talk about the troops at Company / Battalion level for me but at least the British / Irish contingent got a mention which is pleasing and historically accurate.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Mega cock-up, 18 Dec 2013
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This review is from: The Dardanelles: Tragedy and Heroism (Kindle Edition)
My grandfather was in the Dardanelles campaign so I have always been interested, though sadly he died before I could ask about it. Richard Freeman makes the story off the blunders and let-downs so gripping that the successful evacuation at the end comes as a bit of an anti-climax. Many lessons in the story for politicians trying to conduct a war. It was news to me that the famous Lord Kitchener had become a huge liability, I would have liked more about the private soldiers and NCOs who are the real, if reluctant, heroes of the campaign and a bit more about the Turkish army and defences, obviously badly underestmated. Are there parallels with the fall of Singapore in 1942 ?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tragedy Indeed!, 3 Dec 2013
By 
K. G. McAbee "Writer" (Pacolet, SC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Dardanelles: Tragedy and Heroism (Kindle Edition)
Gallipoli. The Dardanelles. In many ways, these names evoke one of the the most disastrous events in an entirely new kind of disastrous war. But who was to blame for the tragedy of the Dardanelles campaign? In Richard Freeman's fascinating, detailed and downright horrifying book The Dardanelles: Brilliant Conception and Tragic Failure, it's clear that nearly everyone involved must share culpability.
Churchill was blamed for forcing the idea of invading the Dardanelles on a reluctant War Council, though in fact he didn't agree with Kitchener about the importance of the campaign.
Lord Kitchener, for all his popularity, was used to a far different sort of war.
Vice Admiral Carden, Commander of the Mediterranean Squadron, was ordered to bomb the Turkish forts to submission in order to clear the way for ground forces; the admiral was weak, elderly and sent vague reports about the Turkish resistance being 'reduced', though in fact little damage could be done from guns created to fight other ships and not forts situated high in the hills.
Sir Ian Hamilton, the general in charge of the ground forces, was sent out from London at a moment's notice, with no plans, out of date maps, no staff, and a supply system that was ludicrously inadequate. When he begged--again and again--for more troops and more ammunition, Kitchener and the War Council ignored his pleas, or else responded with too little, and far too late. And as the casualties mounted, horror grew back home.
Freeman's prose is clear and eloquent as he demonstrates again and again how badly things were managed...and how hideously British and ANZAC soldiers suffered due to this mismanagement.
A powerful, intense, almost day-by-day description of one of the most famous and bloody campaigns of The Great War. Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 1 Aug 2014
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