Customer Reviews


42 Reviews
5 star:
 (15)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wow
I adore Benedict Cumberbatch but this film had many equally brilliant performance. a very ethical film which reflected on how we all loose sight, it explore perspective like no movie before. Definitely for smarter watching though all audiences would enjoy it. this was one of those perfectly balanced films with stunning and relatable script it left me interested in the...
Published 2 months ago by Caitlin Pawaroo

versus
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Truth obscured by Fiction
Since the business of online leaking is in fact quite dry and technically beyond most of us, the film attempts to divert the audience with flashing computer screens of mumbo-jumbo and noisy gatherings of uncertain purpose while flitting frenetically between capitals to show the international scope of Assange's operation.

The "hero" and central figure in terms...
Published 8 months ago by Antenna


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wow, 24 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
I adore Benedict Cumberbatch but this film had many equally brilliant performance. a very ethical film which reflected on how we all loose sight, it explore perspective like no movie before. Definitely for smarter watching though all audiences would enjoy it. this was one of those perfectly balanced films with stunning and relatable script it left me interested in the true story and really makes you question the world around you. it was an epic because the villains and heroes overlapped because they were REAL 3D PEOPLE. some good humour to add to the mix finished off this easily recommendable production
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scatterbrain but still an ambitious, high-scale Robin Hood-like tale of journalistic integrity and power in epic proportions, 10 Nov 2013
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
"While the film has been receiving a lot of bad press for its contrived storyline and execution, poor direction, absymal box office record (only $3m in the United States to date) and Julian Assange himself not approving of the script claiming it as fabricated, The Fifth Estate, which is technically a film about Daniel Berg's viewpoint about the rise and sort-of fall of Wikileaks was surprisingly genuine, intense, philosophical, and appropriately complex yet it is no masterpiece and it is not an easy watch.

For starters, the performances all are promising and the increasingly famous Benedict Cumberbatch has performed brilliantly as Assange mimicking much of his accent and his bizarre and witty mannerisms. Daniel Bruhl's character as Berg is humanising and serves as a good counterpoint to Assange's might including surprisingly good performances from f***ing Malcolm Tucker (I mean,...Peter Capaldi) and Carice van Houten. The film works on many levels by presenting a multi-perspective story with plenty of locales, events, and characters present that sometimes it is hard to keep up but the element of immediacy and danger within the scandals, political turmoil, and questionable journalism/press-related activities all make for intriguing and intellectually stimulating viewing yet the idea that some of the actualities are hindered by docudrama or uncertain remove some of its excellence here.

This is reminiscent of the trendy topical films that have come out like The Social Network and State of Play, films where technology is the core centre of the narratives. The idea that Assange was a rogue journalist is one of the reasons why this film looked more compelling as a potential Oscar contender (but with its 38% Rotten Tomatoes score, this will not likely be the case) and the opening scenes which involve a montage of sequences showing the evolution of the press and closing scenes which explain about Assange's refuge in an Ecuadorian embassy in London serve to point the audience at the meta-awareness that journalism, ideas, and the press all have its faults. That, by-and-large, were the best scenes (and probably the most celebratory this year in 2013) in the whole film despite it being too explanatory.

A lot goes on in this film but even the little details, the dream sequences which serve to explain the frustrated psyche of Berg and Assange, the excellent choice of music (Amon Tobin, of all things, is featured in a scene where the guys are in Berlin), and the strong cinematography (plenty of shots of Europe in its murky glory) and the humorous moments and mood is immediate and fierce and prefers not to squander for the usual sentimentality and silliness that exists in some Hollywood dramas/thrillers and especially Oscar-nominated dramas too.

Bill Condon, despite his poor record directing the Twilight films recently, has bettered himself this time round with The Fifth Estate and if you thought the bad press and Assange's cover-up of alleged issues he has had with people is all hocus-pocus, why not give it a try but your best bet is to see it on Sky Box Office or TV to avoid being rejected."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Truth obscured by Fiction, 18 Oct 2013
By 
Antenna (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
Since the business of online leaking is in fact quite dry and technically beyond most of us, the film attempts to divert the audience with flashing computer screens of mumbo-jumbo and noisy gatherings of uncertain purpose while flitting frenetically between capitals to show the international scope of Assange's operation.

The "hero" and central figure in terms of viewpoint is not Assange but his former colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg. Drawing heavily on the latter's recent book, the film traces the course of his gradual alienation from admiration to bitter disenchantment over what is portrayed as Assange's capricious arrogance and narcissistic desire to control everything. The last straw for Domscheit-Berg seems to have been Assange's alleged cavalier attitude to protecting the anonymity and therefore safety of sources, to the extent of lying to obtain his agreement for the release of data to selected newspapers, but this important point is presented in too rushed a way for me to judge the justice of the charge.

I was left unsure what to believe and uneasy as to the truth and fairness of some of the attacks on Assange. For instance, he is portrayed as "borderline autistic" and psychologically damaged by childhood experiences, but how soundly based is this analysis? Although Benedict Cumberbatch puts in a compelling performance as Assange, and heads up a strong cast including David Thelwis, Laura Linney, Stanley Tucci and even Peter Capaldi (as a somewhat miscast Alan Rusbridger since it is impossible not to keep thinking of "The Thick of It" Malcolm Tucker) the actors seemed let down by the disjointed script and at times clumsy direction. It is implausible that so many hush-hush meetings should take place in bars or trains, all the while casting nervous glances at sinister onlookers, or that Assange would enter sensitive data on board a plane only to shout and hurl his PC around on receiving an unwelcome message. The film repeats too often the device of using a vast array of computers, at some times unmanned, at others operated by clones of Assange, to highlight the fact that what was virtually a one-man band could achieve so much. Also, surely Wikileaks must have involved a team of people, even if dominated by Assange?

In the case of Wikileaks and its founder Assange, truth seems more intriguing than fiction so that I realised too late that I would rather have watched a well-made documentary.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More like a documentary, 15 Jun 2014
By 
E. Cameron "liz cameron" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Fifth Estate (Blu-ray)
In it's favour, Benedict Cumberbatch was very good as Assange, however, the film was more like a documentary and very slow to get going. Interested enough story to watch it to the end, but could have been a lot better, perhaps with a different Director? All in all, disappointing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK movie, 13 May 2014
By 
B. R. Lane - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
Good story and a very interesting story line. It is a pity the actors mumbled so much. I am not hard of hearing but I needed to put on the subtitles to understand what was beeingsaid
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The great Benedict Cumberbatch is back this time as the character of Julian Assange. Discover the truth of networks folks., 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
So, I think that the DVD product containing the film of the Fifth Estate is interesting because this film reminds me of the 2010 American film called The Social Network.
The film was about portraying the founding of social networking website Facebook and the resulting lawsuits.
In this film, however, this is about the news-leaking website called WikiLeaks.
I mean, a majority of people like this film, others may not like it for which I'm fine about.

Also, the reason why I recently ordered this particular DVD yesterday is because of Benedict Cumberbatch.
I mean, he is one of the best of British actors around. You may ask me ''Why?''.
Well, I can tell you that he has appeared in all three series of the BBC television crime drama series of Sherlock with Martin Freeman performing as the character of Doctor John Watson and he has appeared in other films such as War Horse in 2011 as the character of Major Jamie Stewart, Smaug the terrifying fire-breathing dragon in the Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in late 2013 and of course, the 2011 Cold War espionage film of Tinker Tailor Solider Spy with the other actors of Gary Oldman (Commissioner Gordon from the Dark Knight films), Colin Firth (the character of Mr Darcy in the 1995 television adaptation of Jane Austen), John Hurt (He was the Dragon in the BBC's fantasy drama of Merlin and the character of the War Doctor alongside the actors of Matt Smith as the Eleventh Doctor, Jenna Coleman as Clara, Jemma Redgrave as UNIT officer Kate Stewart, Welsh actress Joanna Page played the character of Tudor Queen Elizabeth (from Gavin and Stacey), Billie Piper and David Tennant in the 50th anniversary special of Doctor Who: the Day of the Doctor in November 2013), Mark Strong (he played Lord Henry Blackwood in the 2009 film of Sherlock Holmes) and Toby Jones. Toby played different characters such as the Dream Lord in the seventh 2010 episode of Doctor Who titled ''Amy's Choice'' and he appeared as a computer super-villain called Arnim Zola in the Marvel 2014 film of Captain America: The Winter Soldier.
So, yes, that is my background story of Benedict Cumberbatch for you, folks.

Another actor that does appear in this film is the Scottish actor of Peter Capaldi.
I mean, in my opinion, he is a good 56 year old actor in general, though the reality is that how will fans react when they might see him on screen for the first time as the new Twelfth Doctor in the new eighth series of Doctor Who in the autumn.
Mind you, I think that he is currently filming and doing scenes for Doctor Who with Jenna Coleman at this moment in time.
But, who knows what he will become in the future, eh?

Overall, I think I like the film of the Fifth Estate because this film relates to the character of Julian Assange.
If you own the film, I suggest that you watch the film carefully because you may or may not understand the context of the power of social-networking. That is my honest opinion, folks.
Although, would you like to know which price I have paid for the DVD?
The answer is... 6.65. It's good, isn't it?

So, thank you very much indeed for listening to my review of this product and please feel free to share your comments down below for this review sometime soon. Four stars all round. Bye for now! From Richard Hill
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Slow and uninspiring, 11 May 2014
This review is from: The Fifth Estate (DVD)
This was a very slow-moving film - we gave it 50 minutes and then gave up uninspired by the characters or pace of the film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far better than I was led to expect, 23 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
The film focuses upon the setting up of the Wikileaks web site. Despite my fears I found it even handed in its dealing with the principle characters and it left me to decide whether Assange was truly a visionary or a misguided man.
Benedict Cumberbatch was excellent and the outstanding performance in a strong cast. I believe that this film deserved greater appreciation and a more thoughtful response. It is not a blockbuster full of action but a film that invites debate and thought and puts the onus on the viewer to decide.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'WORLD-WIDE' -'THE AUTHORITIES HAD NO ANSWER', 20 Feb 2014
By 
rbmusicman (U.K) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This based on fairly recent events, the story of the 'Winileaks' revelations.
'Julian Assange' (Benedict Cumberbatch) 'Sherlock' ...and computer hacker 'Daniel
Berg' (Daniel Br'uhl) 'Rush' team up to release sensitive material that they believe
the world at large should know.
The leaked information tied the authorities and businesses up in knots with no idea
how to prevent the exposures.
Global support grows for their activity, the stakes are raised, they have rattled the
cage of the U.S. intelligence agencies.
Are lives being put at risk by the revelations ?
'Wilileaks' reveal fraud, military and political secrets along with human rights violations,
and much much more.
They certainly stirred up a hornets nest that authorities seemed powerless to close
down.
World-wide agencies are trying to trace the sources of the released information.
'Daniel' believes that his hacking activities cannot be identified by the many authorities
trying to catch them.
They made 'whistle-blowing' an art-form.
An intense and absorbing in fact 'mind-blowing' story, the film will almost certainly pull
you in from start to finish.
This could not happen.......but did.
Great performance from 'Benedict Cumberbach'
A MUST SEE.
Special features:-
* The submission platform.
* In-Camera Graphics.
* Scoring Secrets.
* Trailers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Neither Fish Nor Fowl, 2 Dec 2013
This review is from: The Fifth Estate [DVD] (DVD)
I looked forward to seeing "The Fifth Estate" at the cinema, not the least because I haven't yet made up my mind on Assange--"Hero or Villain?" as the posters ask. Beyond ongoing press revelations over the years, I was only familiar with the story as a cogent narrative from the book "Wikileaks" by the editors of The Guardian. As a pretty lefty liberal, I'm inclined to mistrust all government and side with anyone who reveals its corrupt interior, but I would've been quite tolerant of a coherent case for Assange as dangerous megalomaniac, given how scattershot the leaks he publishes are. The problem is director Bill Condon decided to give us both. However balanced he (and apparently his star, Benedict Cumberbatch) thought he was being, the result is a long-winded blur of character study, mixed in with a detailed overview of the birth of Wikileaks, and some late-in-the-game international tension. Throw in the petty bitterness which pops up between the author of the other source book ("Inside Wikileaks" by Daniel Domscheit-Berg, played here by Daniel Bruhl) and his erstwhile mentor, and you have a movie that leaves you as baffled and unresolved as you were before you paid for your ticket.

As a straight-on character study, untainted by failed idealism via Domscheit-Berg, this film might've been quite something. There gets to be a point where saying any more about how talented an actor Benedict Cumberbatch is makes you sound like one of his 'fangurls', but, as is so common with this actor, his ability to immerse himself in a role is remarkable. Though his face superficially looks nothing like Assange's, he does such phenomenal work with body language and head/eye movements, to say nothing of how his face is transformed by twitches, accent, and prosthetic teeth and hair, that Cumberbatch quite disappears. (I have a theory that this flop might not stick to him, as much for the reason that no one will quite remember he was in it at all, so complete is his vanishing act.) When he is on screen, the movie slows down and you are compelled to watch him recreate. Had Condon just added--with appropriate sub-textual reservations--some of the pettiness of the one-time disciple kvetching, among other things, about how his mentor embarrassed him at mom and dad's over dinner (you expected perhaps the manners of the petit bourgeoisie, Domscheit-Berg?), the movie might have been a real-life "Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" writ large: plenty of blame to go around, no true heroism on either side, a study of the foibles of the near-great and betrayals by those with whom they surround themselves. But no.

Condon (and the writer Josh Singer) has another book to source and so we're also going to be treated to a great deal of information on the development of Wikileaks--from a one-man show to an international 'cause celebre'. Suddenly, there are too many venues, too many characters, and now we're rooting for the boys to outwit the monsters of press and government who are on their heels. And here's where Condon loses sight of the 'vision thing'. First, he introduces, more than half-way through the movie, another sub-plot starring two excellent American character actors: Stanley Tucci and Laura Linney. And they are, well and truly, 'Government'--maybe State Department, maybe CIA. But Linney is trying to save actual people from the fallout of the scattershot Wikileaks revelations, and she will lose her seemingly 'good-guy' job over what the 'boys' of Wiki have been up to.

Though this is the most suspense-filled portion of the movie (from which Assange himself has all-but-disappeared), I am astonished that an experienced director like Bill Condon didn't notice that he was forcing the audience to switch sides emotionally. We were not fully enough vested in these odd-accented, off-the-radar intellectuals he had built the first half of the movie around to relate to them again after the Linney-Tucci mini-movie gave us government-with-heart. In fact, whereas Domscheit-Berg (Bruhl) was only annoying while he was losing his Assange-religion before this, we are now bizarrely asked to root for him to align himself with 'press and government' in order to shut Assange down. All that collateral damage was implicit from the first step he took with Assange. The intrinsic morality (or lack thereof) of Wikileaks didn't change because of what Bradley Manning gave them or what Assange released.

Am I wrong to ask the director (and writer) of the movie to give me a coherent ethical point-of-view, even if I disagree with it? (Indeed, with a subject matter as contemporary as this one, there were always going to be some who disagreed, no matter whether "hero or villain"--and that may have been point enough.) It's harder with biopics, I know, but the usually reliable Cumberbatch may play a bigger role in the movie's pursuing 'balance' at the expense of cohesion than we might think. We know he exchanged emails with Assange on a couple of occasions. And in an article in The Independent which predates the movie's opening, co-star David Thewlis said admiringly of Cumberbatch, "I think he's turned the film around. . . . I think he became more sympathetic towards Julian as the film went on, as opposed to the script [which] changed."

No matter if he was unduly influenced by his gifted star, the buck stops with the director; it was his duty to pursue the 'vision thing' if he wanted this to be memorable for something other the worst box office of 2013. The movie Condon wanted to 'channel', so it is said, was "The Social Network", but there Fincher (director) and Sorkin (writer) did have a moral, even if it was one the Zuckerberg character was destined not to understand. Here, everyone valued the real Assange's understanding too much. No wonder Wikileaks' answer to "The Fifth Estate", a documentary called "Mediastan" and released the same week as the DreamWorks movie, proportionally outperformed the bigger film: Assange was more than willing to use bias for dramatic effect. Why didn't anyone send that memo to Bill Condon?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Fifth Estate [Blu-ray]
The Fifth Estate [Blu-ray] by Bill Condon (Blu-ray - 2014)
11.67
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews