Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book could put Dilbert out of business...
Tom Morrison has identified a better business
management theory. It's not new, as he points
out. It is simply the application of centuries
of accumulated wisdom to our modern experience.
By writing this book, he has done us all a great
service. Now, if only my manager and CEO would
read it....

Morrison applies the four...
Published on 26 Oct 1997

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bought as a present
Bought as a present for someone who is interested in philosophy, was told that this is a very good book
Published on 11 Feb 2010 by J. Ponomarjova


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book could put Dilbert out of business..., 26 Oct 1997
By A Customer
Tom Morrison has identified a better business
management theory. It's not new, as he points
out. It is simply the application of centuries
of accumulated wisdom to our modern experience.
By writing this book, he has done us all a great
service. Now, if only my manager and CEO would
read it....

Morrison applies the four dimensions of human
experience identified by the Greek sage, Aristotle,
to business development. Each dimension has a
direct application through four foundations of
excellence. As Morrison summarizes it, the Intellectual
Dimension aims at Truth; the Aesthetic at Beauty;
the Moral at Goodness; and the Spiritual at Unity.

But don't groan about the esoterics just yet. Morrison
applies each of these very complex notions to our
everyday experience and shows how striving for
fulfillment in the four dimensions brings excellence
and success in business, small and large.

Morrison fails to step beyond Aristotle, however,
in not discussing the Economic foundation that
aims at Utility. Any attempt at the introduction
of philosophical principles to business should
include it. Heilbroner could give him a few pointers
on that one.

Lastly, the aphorisms and quotations spread throughout
the text, while interesting and applicable (I'll be
be using some as marquees on my screen saver), are
quite distracting.

Without a doubt, If Aristotle Ran General Motors
is a great resource that should be studied and applied
to every person's employment. I've been waiting
a long time for a book like this one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great, inspiring, motivating- easy to read, 18 Jun 1999
By A Customer
The book was great!! I found it easy to read, and very inspiring- if you are a manager in any capacity you will like this book- you'll learn something even if you think you have it all figured out!A great motivational tool!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting look at business and decision-making., 7 April 1998
By A Customer
Using four virtues (truth, beauty, goodness, and unity) as guidelines for making business decisions was a great approach for the book. The section on goodness was especially interesting because it mentions how everyday situations can be seen as ethical decisions. I particularly enjoyed the quotes that Morris uses throughout the book which provide other thinkers' ideas about ethics. Morris also does a great job of combining all of the elements at the beginning and then giving his justification.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and inspiring, 30 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This is the first time I've been moved enough to write an online review. Tom Morrison's lessons for humanity in business should be must reading for leaders who want something more than today's dog-eat-dog approach. Brilliant and inspiring!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should be mandatory reading for MBA students and all CEO's, 2 Mar 1999
By A Customer
I've been working globally on "people issues" for too many years without finding guidance that works in most cultures, at all organization levels, and for any industry. I think I found it in this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bought as a present, 11 Feb 2010
By 
J. Ponomarjova "Julia" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Bought as a present for someone who is interested in philosophy, was told that this is a very good book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not a good book., 11 May 1999
By A Customer
Morris's attitude is, "Gee whiz, I'm a real live philosopher!"--even though he has no real philosophical perspective. His book is intellectually flabby. He does not portray philosophy accurately and trys to make it seem as though there is a unity within the whole of philosophy that supports his overly simplistic outline of what's important.
He does not discuss how Aristotle or any other philosopher would do things differently at any particular company. (Thus the title, which is intriguing, does not portray the content of the book accurately). Rather, he discusses how such and such a value in his conceptualization of things is held important by philosophy in general. This is not real philosophy. Philosophy is not a unified set of feel-good beliefs and morals that can guide us in making our decisions. Rather, philosophy comprises many divergent and contradictory sets of beliefs and perspectives. People do in fact take guidance from particular philosophers and their works, but they usually adhere, more or less, to a certain philosophical school, since other schools are likely to believe totally opposite things. Either Morris doesn't get this, in which he's incompetent, or he's purposely selling a dumbed-down version of "philosophy" to the vulger masses.
The above are bad flaws. But the killer flaw of the book is that it is dull.
As a person who has a BA in philosophy and is currently working on an MBA, I highly dis-recommend this book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews