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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Darker than advertised, better than critics say.
If you're used to the harmless evil of Disgea and come here expecting more of the same, you're going to be shocked, offended, or may even find the game unplayable. Metallica is genuinely despicable for much of the earlier parts of the game, so be forewarned. Personally, I enjoyed playing henchman for a protagonist whose evil was genuine rather than cartoonish, but your...
Published 5 months ago by PC

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars An interesting idea and a potential hidden gem strangled by poor decisions
Witch and the Hundred Knight is a Japanese action RPG in a similar vein to Secret of Mana. It has a warped sense of humour and an unusually dark story line. So far, so interesting!

As you guide the Hundred Knight - a mute, diminutive warrior with a penchant for big spiky and clubby weapons - through the game, different gameplay systems are revealed. These...
Published 3 months ago by WudUKindly


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Darker than advertised, better than critics say., 28 Mar 2014
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PC (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) (Video Game)
If you're used to the harmless evil of Disgea and come here expecting more of the same, you're going to be shocked, offended, or may even find the game unplayable. Metallica is genuinely despicable for much of the earlier parts of the game, so be forewarned. Personally, I enjoyed playing henchman for a protagonist whose evil was genuine rather than cartoonish, but your reaction may differ.

That out of the way, this is a truly excellent game. A mighty anchor title that'll keep you playing the previous gen console a while longer.

The combat is excellent. With a little practice you'll be agile, dangerous, and feeling satisfied. The screen is busy without being crowded, overhead warnings are useful without being patronising. Systems are heaped high without being convoluted. Just excellent all-round design.

Major characters who seem typical at first grow out of it quickly. The story is unusual- as it has to be, with a genuine not-for-laughs villain who doesn't suit many typical anime tropes. Sato Tenpei delivers a superb soundtrack to accompany the Hundred Knight, which comes as a surprise to nobody in light of the guy being a major talent. And finally, while I can't speak for the English dub because I switched straight away, the Japanese dub is up to the JP Voice Acting industry's usual standards of consistent excellence.

Do yourself a big favour if you're a NIS fan, a JRPG fan, and/or just a fan of mid-budget oddities that embarrass hundred-million dollar AAA's by matching their quality while far exceeding their courage and imagination. Buy this game.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome game, short review., 11 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) (Video Game)
The Witch and the Hundred Knight is a delightfully dark game, with Nippon Ichi Software's trademark brand of humor, found in almost all of their games. I do not wish to spoil the story for you, but suffice to say, you are the titular Hundred Knight, summoned by the Swamp Witch Metallia to perform a series of tasks and challenges to help her achieve her goal.

You start each level with a slowly decreasing time limit, and can wield up to five weapons at a time, each one used in the order they are equipped. Learning enemy patterns is the key to success, as learning them, will allow you to avoid their powerful attacks and strike when they are vulnerable, especially the bosses. This all works really well, with other in-game abilities being added and revealed, giving you more options in combat.

The game is full of memorable characters, from the cursed Visco, Arlecchio the eternally loyal and long suffering servant/butler of Metallia, the Swamp Witch herself and even minor characters like the Shaman Nahab or Valentine the Duchess of Flowers are all memorable. I recommend the game to any Nippon Ichi fan, particularly those who play for the interesting characters and stories.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars An interesting idea and a potential hidden gem strangled by poor decisions, 27 May 2014
This review is from: The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) (Video Game)
Witch and the Hundred Knight is a Japanese action RPG in a similar vein to Secret of Mana. It has a warped sense of humour and an unusually dark story line. So far, so interesting!

As you guide the Hundred Knight - a mute, diminutive warrior with a penchant for big spiky and clubby weapons - through the game, different gameplay systems are revealed. These gradually increase the complexity of the game's item and combat systems, preparing you to serve the Hundred Knight's summoner and master, the Great Swamp Witch Metallia, an explosive-tempered blonde with a foul mouth and disdain for excessive clothing.

Throughout the game you'll return to Metallia's swamp lair repeatedly to progress through the story, watch conversations between the game's characters and stock up on a few items. The ultimate aim is to spread the witch's swamp over the world so that she can pass freely through the world and trample.. everyone.

The characters look gorgeous in their 2D sorta-animated conversation guises, it's an interesting plot which thankfully avoids saving the world while controlling a lifeless, miserable anime teenager with spiky hair, the game's music is a high point as well with catchy tunes spread throughout game worlds, battles and intermissions. The core of combat is simple - Hundred Knight can target an enemy to circle them and swap slaps or jump out of the way, if timed 'correctly' this evasion move can slow time allowing you to get more hits on your hapless enemy. There are then further facets of combat - strong attacks, summoning help in the form of other underworld denizens in different guises, an all-in boost attack that ramps up power and defense in exchange for limiting the amount of time Hundred Knight can fight. The real meat of combat though is organizing Hundred Knights arsenal of weapons. These can be of five different types (staves, hammers, swords etc.) and can inflict either blunt, magic or piercing damage. Up to five weapons can be equipped at once, each forming a single attack in Hundred Knight's 5-hit combo (though you can equip fewer weapons if you wish and shorten the combo). In addition, weapons of the same type can produce different attacks, depending on the weapon equipped.

All of this works fine, but the game doesn't provide a particularly interesting playground to send Hundred Knight hurtling through. Although some maps contain villages with some NPCs and houses to ransack, most maps are just different graphical details over the same type of terrain coupled with palette-swap enemies or bouncing spherical enemies which always appear in the same triangle formation. Bosses are a mixed bag, some are a walkover with the 'right' weapon or technique, others are a slog which nothing is powerful against. Since each boss only has two or three attacks (with some becoming longer or more complicated as they near death), these slog fests become very repetitive very quickly. Still, combat as a whole is fine.

Where the game trips over is the amount of redundant or half-baked ideas which have been dropped onto the basic gameplay. One of the major parts of play, previously unmentioned, is the Hundred Knight's torch-helmet. This lifeline is fuelled by 'Gcals', which is basically a timer that starts at 100 and counts down to zero. Exploring and mapping areas burns these Gcals more quickly than retreading previously explored areas (the torch burns away the fog of war), whenever the Hundred Knight is injured Gcals are also burned more quickly in order to restore him. If Gcals run out then the Hundred Knight is a drained sitting duck, and must either escape from the map or use a restorative to get some Gcals back. The problem with this system is that it adds a needless timer which punishes the player for taking damage or merely exploring the game. Only limited restoratives can be carried anyway, so why is it needed?

There are several other examples. It is possible to enter houses in the game in order to 'dominate' them and bring them under the witch's control. That's the theory. In fact all this is good for is stealing the item each building contains, the house-shaking animation and resultant 'Witch Domination' message and confetti that showers you on a successful domination hints at there being some kind of point to it. There isn't, beyond a few baubles. Another is digging for items. The game presents this as a way of getting free stuff (hurrah) but the only items can be obtained are the item needed for weapon upgrades (you'll quickly amass more than you need) and items which can be sold for an insignificant amount of cash. So much for that.

Another is the bonus point system. Attacking enemies and performing other actions (such as digging, go figure) racks up bonus points which can then be used to augment the Hundred Knight's attack/defense, boost Gcals or top another bonus counter that lets the Hundred Knight finish the stage with bonus items. These points (and the bonuses) only last for the current trip, resetting the moment you leave. So, in order to boost the Hundred Knight, first you have to explore the area fully in order to prevent Gcal loss on another trip, then you have to grind enemies, then make your way to the boss or whatever is holding you back in the first place. If it's a boss then you're still with fewer Gcals/restoratives (less time!) than you would have been, if standard enemies are tough then you can't grind them anyway. So what's the point?

One of the Hundred Knight's summoned helpers captures enemies with low health and converts them into an item, another gameplay facet which really interested me when it was introduced. Possibilities! At least it seemed so for awhile.. This item is occasionally a restorative (depending on the enemy type) or near-useless accessory, but most enemies convert into 'loot'. What's loot? It's something to sell for cash. What's cash for? Virtually nothing. The game's shops stock a low amount of basic restoratives and weapons/armour which is always redundant (a few levels behind what you can find from enemy drops), making cash almost unnecessary. << That's the real problem, everything's been hooked up so one facet of gameplay feeds into another, but so many of them are bodged you end up trying to pick through them to find something actually worth doing. It takes a lot of hours to get to that point, but the game introduces all these interesting things then over time you discover that most of them don't actually lead anywhere worth going.

It's difficult to explain the game's systems without writing a small book, but to me the above are examples of a game which was shoved out of the developer's office before it was finished or before "let's tidy that up later x30" got dealt with. After slogging through 3/4 of the game I've had to admit defeat, I cannot bear the thought of wasting any more time trying to wring some fun out of this thing.

The usual disclaimer: This is my opinion and I don't have a monopoly on the truth, there are plenty of players who love this game.

I'm all for Double-A, low-budget or experimental console games, but The Witch and the Hundred Knight represents the absolute worst, in my opinion. It invites you in with its quirky look, characters and soundtrack, then dashes all your interest against the wall with wildly varying boss/level difficulty, grinding and a stack of interesting ideas which nobody bothered to make work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 14 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) (Video Game)
combat is very satifying and well explained
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars witchy fun, 27 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) (Video Game)
a very amusing game. it takes many references from the likes of disegea and put them to use in a different way which makes for an enjoyable and humourous gaming experience.
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The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3)
The Witch and the Hundred Knight (PS3) by NIS America (PlayStation 3)
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