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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good introduction
I already had a pre-written program using directx11 but only my own rudimentary collision detection. I realised I needed to plugin some sort of physics library so after deciding on bullet I found this book available. Although it is written with freeglut in mind it was very easy to follow examples and find what I needed of the bullet physics content and have successful...
Published 11 months ago by Amazon Customer

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not great
Covering both physics and OpenGL in any meaningful way in only 100 pages is very ambitious, Learning Game Physics with Bullet Physics and OpenGL makes a half decent fist of it.

I found the first and third chapter very promising; concise, well written, covering relevant points thoroughly and articulately. Unfortunately the rest of the book falls short with a...
Published 12 months ago by DC Bateman


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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not great, 16 Feb. 2014
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DC Bateman (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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Covering both physics and OpenGL in any meaningful way in only 100 pages is very ambitious, Learning Game Physics with Bullet Physics and OpenGL makes a half decent fist of it.

I found the first and third chapter very promising; concise, well written, covering relevant points thoroughly and articulately. Unfortunately the rest of the book falls short with a number of faults, although many are too minor to warrant criticism. Still...

The book's sub-title includes the line "modern feature-rich graphics" which is misleading at best, the OpenGL here is most assuredly not modern and only a few features (lighting, materials) are used. OpenGL is used as no more than a method of visualisation (with GLUT used to handle user input) and not covered in any real depth, the bulk of the book is dedicated to Bullet Physics.

Disappointingly, Dickinson uses _very_ old OpenGL, in particular, glBegin() and glEnd() were deprecated with OpenGL 3.0, are inefficient and would be better replaced with vertex arrays. This choice is explained as being made to avoid complexity, however considering the level of the other material in the book that seems a poor excuse at best.

Some specific shortcomings:
The explanation of normals is a bit ropey; normals are attributed to points (which is wrong, since normals are perpendicular to lines or surfaces, a point can never have one).
glPopMatrix() and glPushMatrix() are not "delimiter functions" nor are they like glBegin() and glEnd().
While functions are clearly explained, parameter lists are omitted, making it difficult to know which parameters to pass and in which order.

Good (but not great), this book is certainly useful as a practical introduction to BulletPhysics, but not OpenGL. I found it to be a generally pleasant read with clear, concise, readable style marred by a few technical errors of varying severity.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good introduction, 22 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Learning Game Physics with Bullet Physics and OpenGL (Kindle Edition)
I already had a pre-written program using directx11 but only my own rudimentary collision detection. I realised I needed to plugin some sort of physics library so after deciding on bullet I found this book available. Although it is written with freeglut in mind it was very easy to follow examples and find what I needed of the bullet physics content and have successful installed bullet physics in my game. Would have saved me a lot of hassle if I'd used bullet a few months ago. Word of advice if you are trying to write a game and all your own collision detection and physics etc, there is enough complexity writing a game without having to worry about all the physics as well. Bullet seems a nice alternative to me.
At the moment bullet calcs are not run on the GPU however you can still do all the actual rendering on the cpu and I've got quite a few things whizzing about in the sky and the bullet physics calculations on the CPU are running very nicely.
Anyway great book for what I wanted. I know there are some tutorials and a wiki but I always prefer a book if there is a decent one.
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