Shop now Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

217
4.0 out of 5 stars
Blue Is the Warmest Colour [Blu-ray]
Format: Blu-rayChange
Price:£8.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Boy or boy - nearly three hours long with the actors encouraged to improvise scenes that are so long you could go and make a cup of tea and not miss much. This doesn't diminish its quality, the in the moment reality of it, the chance to follow moods and views as they develop in the character's mind. Highly sexually explicit at times, though not indulgent if you are making a point about the close bond between two people that forms as a result of a great deal of good sex! And over time the story and relationships shift leaving you with your own conclusions about relationships of any kind. Tender. True.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 19 December 2014
Tunisian-French screenwriter, producer and director Abdellatif Kechiche`s fifth feature film which he co-wrote with screenwriter Ghalia Lacroix, is a loose adaptation of a graphic novel from 2010 by French graphic novelist and visual artist Julie Maroh. It premiered In competition at the 66th Cannes International Film Festival in 2013, was screened in the Special Presentations section at the 38th Toronto International Film Festival in 2013, was shot on locations in France and is a France-Belgium-Spain co-production which was produced by producers Olivier Théry-Lapiney and Laurence Clerc. It tells the story about a fifteen-year-old French girl named Adèle who lives with her mother and father in a house in a city of French Flanders. Whilst interpreting parts of a novel as an obligatory part of her secondary education where one of the central themes in the book is love at first sight, Adèle is encouraged by her close circle of friends to acquaint a fellow student named Thomas whom has expressed his interest in her.

Distinctly and precisely directed by Tunisian-French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main character`s point of view, draws a gripping portrayal of an aspiring school teacher from a working-class family whom after having befriended a same-aged boy encounters an intellectual painter who studies at an academy called Beaux Arts named Emma. While notable for its atmospheric and variegated milieu depictions, reverent cinematography by cinematographer Sofian El Fani, production design by production designer Julia Lemaire and use of sound, colors and light, this character-driven and narrative-driven story about how interpersonal relations are affected by social injustice and social differences and how human beings relate to their first experience of loneliness, where acting is taken to an almost hazardous level of emotional realism, which is more externalized than internalized and where a daughter whom has just discovered that she is attracted to a woman enters a new romance without guarding her emotions, depicts an increasingly heartrending study of character.

This memorably atmospheric, eloquently humerous, sociologically romantic and ultimately authentic coming-of-age indie love-story which is set in a city in France in the late 20th century, which envisages three of the finest hours of fictional love in 2013, where the emphasis on aesthetics nearly precedes the human aspects and where a high school student who uncritically embraces what life has to offer her is excluded by her friends as a consequence of making a decision which at the time seems like the most honest thing to do for her and introduced to a new lifestyle which makes her feel misplaced, is impelled and reinforced by its cogent narrative structure, substantial character development, subtle continuity, efficient film editing, timely use of music, involving dialog, crucial interplay and the strikingly excruciating acting performances by French actresses Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos. A present, rarely lingering and accomplished narrative feature which gained, among numerous other awards, the Palme d`Or at the 66th Cannes Film Festival in 2013.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 2014
First things first ... the film might well be notorious for its ten minute sex scene, but there are far greater moments of intimacy and candidness - not least, the close-up image, repeated several times, of Adele asleep on her pillow, her lips apart, and dribble forming at the corner of her mouth ( mucus and mucus-like fluids being a recurring motif in this film - snot, tears, saliva, spaghetti and half-alive oysters, the latter fed to the ingenue Adele by the maturer sophisticate, Emma).

Sometimes the film feels like an intellectual check-list - Sartre, Picasso, Tiresius and numerous French classical novelists all get name-checked. But, cliches and erotica aside, there is something deeply tender and moving about this film, and the core of this can be found in the orginal French title, "The Life of Adele, Chapters 1 and 2". For this is a film wholly about its heroine, Adele, and her uncertain journey through her early adult years.

And it is Adele Exarchopoulos' stunning portrayal of Adele, in all its intimacy and subtlety and complexity, that merits the film being called a masterpiece. Regardless of the controversies surrounding "Blue is The Warmest Colour", and its occasional shortcomings, viewers will have the presence of Adele lingering in their minds long after the curtains close on the final, beautiful scene.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 July 2014
A very cleverly directed French movie, addresses homosexuality. The story is about a young woman that falls in love with a few years older lesbian. It portrays the difficulties the young woman faces and have to go through when she realises she is gay. It shows not only her own challenges with herself but with parent, schoolmates and close friends too. It also depicts the friendship and warmhearted people she gets to know, meeting the woman with the blue hair. The movie has sexual explicit scene directed and performed wonderfully.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 January 2015
Highly emotional, and tense story of two ladies and their affair. The love making scenes are hot but most men and women would find them very erotic.
It seems a shame that in 2014 lesbians and gays still have such a difficult time being accepted in society.

There should be more lesbian and gay scenes on terrestrial television, the subject still feels taboo by so much of the media.

If you want a caring, loving, inspiring love story, about genuine love and affection. This is for you
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 October 2014
Coming-of-age film featuring the most intense desire I have ever seen portrayed on film. And I'm not just talking about the sex scenes. The two leading ladies are exceptional and the director deserves huge credit for telling the raw, honest story while skilfully treading the difficult ground between art and pornography. It's a long film, perhaps a couple of scenes could have been edited out, but it managed to keep me fully absorbed throughout.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 24 July 2015
This is a very blue film in all senses and its very "French" - they smoke all the time, have a lot of sex and eat crepes and lounge about naked all the time - but its lovely (except the smoking). Obviously It had a lot of potential to be clichéd, but it wasn't at all because there's something very tactile about the way its filmed, you feel like you could taste, touch and smell everything on screen and the acting was so natural and believable - there was a real and tender chemistry between the leads. And Adele was just fascinating but annoyingly the only thing I really feel I learned about her in this film is that she really likes the colour blue and that it really can be a warm colour.. it is still definitely worth watching. It manages to be sweet and romantic and realistic despite all of the graphic sex - a lot of people have said that it seems pornographic but I don't think so, it was graphic but there was something so pure about it that it just seemed normal and touching - like its just what you would do if youre young and in love in a new relationship. Also the sex scenes described their love, their unique relationship - how completely they loved and wanted each other.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 1 April 2014
I watched this on projection thinking that it might struggle to hold my attention for three hours in French. What I found was this is an ideal way of viewing what is such a bright, colourful, always moving picture. And yet it is all close-up. Even the occasional street scenes have an intimacy to them.

It's young and intimate. Alive and vivid and real. The story is what so often is found in earnest soap-operas. Or what used to be dour kitchen-sink dramas. But not with this wonderful exposé of relationships between human beings. And not just the physical proximity of lovers but also between parents, work colleagues and with little children.

I loved the tapestry being woven. Art. Literature. Philosophy. Bolognaise. Clothes. Hair and Music. The music always inside the movie. Never tagged on. Truly stunning acting performances especially from the main female lead. But above all I was always interested in how the story would develop. We never have black and white, easy circumstantial 'evidence' to make you think what will happen next. Even when I was certain. So much is shown where words could not tread. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 31 July 2014
Beautifully constructed and acutely accurate portrayal of romance and heartbreak between two girls. Aside from the mesmerizing sex scenes which were obviously not placed in there to appease mainstream audiences, this story is probably the best example of modern gay romance of either hetro normative or LGBT cinema to be released in a very very long time.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 May 2014
Forget the hype about the lesbian love scenes in this film this is a truly remarkable, and very sad, film with great acting from all involved.

Was engrossed from the start and this never waivered.

A really clever film concerning relationships and the pressures that can be applied from without and within.

Buy and enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Nymphomaniac Volumes I & II Directors Cut [DVD] [Blu-ray]
Nymphomaniac Volumes I & II Directors Cut [DVD] [Blu-ray] by Charlotte Gainsbourg (Blu-ray - 2015)
£12.00


Nymphomaniac Vol I. & Vol II. (2 Disc Blu-ray)
Nymphomaniac Vol I. & Vol II. (2 Disc Blu-ray) by Charlotte Gainsbourg (Blu-ray - 2014)
£8.08
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.