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4.8 out of 5 stars128
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on 20 May 2015
Amazing. I'm a photographer who loves the versatility of a DSLR, it's lenses and options but am not a photographer who pores over images in post-production or tweaks every last setting on the camera. I need something that functions well, quickly and is easy to understand so when I have the time (and inclination) to amend settings and play about I can without poring over the manual but at other times I can just pick up and shoot and know I'm going to get a good result. This camera does that and more.

I upgraded from the D5100 which I thought I didn't really have any complaints about except auto focus speed in low light, this has blown me away. The AF speed is significantly improved on the D5100 and I while I had no complaints about image quality the improvement in the D5300 is noticeable. WiFi and GPS has proved more useful than I had thought and as I always have my phone with me then I don't need to worry about remembering a remote control.

The controls are well laid out and easy to master, the screen lovely and bright and clear. I have "tweaked" things far more in the D5300 just because the layout is much easier and the screen display much more intuitive, I can easily understand what the impact of a change I've made to aperture or shutter is on the exposure or image which I never really quite mastered on the D5100. If I don't like it it is simple to revert back. The preset dials and improved layout/larger screen are a joy to use.

The 18-140mm is a cracking lens for the kit and price. It has replaced my 18-55DX and 55-200DX which sat alongside my 70-300FX lens.. The AF speed of the 18-140 and the versatility of the lens is far better than the twin kit I got with the D5100. It fills the gap nicely and I often now will just go out with the 18-140 and leave the other lens at home as the loss of the range between 140 and 200 is nothing compared to the hassle of changing lenses. It is fast, surprisingly bright and for general use I can't fault it.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 11 June 2014
The D5300 is an update to the previous D5200 model, it 's not a revolution over the previous model but it is quite well featured in most respects, though for heavy flash users you might want to step up to the D7000/7100 which offer more functionality

It's a nice compact body, and a good introduction to photography.
A quick summary of the good and weaker areas

Pros:
+ Very good image quality from the 24mp CMOS sensor, no optical low pass filter makes for sharper images with a bit more resolution
+ Impressive 39 point AF system with 9 cross type sensors
+ Built-in Wi-Fi and GPS
+ 3.2" LCD screen with a meaty 1.04M dots very sharp and clear as well as articulated
+ 5fps is quite fast (buffer is about 8-9 shots Raw, about the same jpeg no so big but ok)
+ Good full HD movie mode with audio control and mic input, sharp and clear video (some moire at times though)
+ Has MLU (mirror lock up) useful for macro and longer focal lengths
+ Good Auto ISO settings you can set a min shutter speed, or let it work on focal length (ie increase speed to match focal length used or reduce it for wider angle lenses) You can even tune it to faster or slower speeds. Very nice
+ Built in AF assist light is useful though can be a bit harsh for people subjects

Cons:
- No depth of field preview
- Won't autofocus screw drive lenses (non AF-S)
- Limited flash capabilities, no Auto FP (High speed sync), no native support of wireless flash (CLS) with built in flash
- Live view and movie AF could be quicker, cannot see real preview of aperture set until the shot is fired
- No vertical grip option (shame really third party ones might turn up though with some compromises)

D5300 v D3300 (main differences)

D5300 has an articulated LCD (which is also higher res)
39 point AF system with 9 cross type sensors v the 11 AF points on the D3300 (one cross type sensor)
D5300 has wifi and GPS built in, the D3300 has neither

Image quality wise the cameras are near enough identical (both have no optical low pass filter)

Some field notes:

Battery life is about 550-600 shots, though using the movie and live view will drain it more. Worth picking up a spare

Image quality is very good but you really need something a bit better to take advantage of the full 24mp resolution, the kit lens is ok but not really up to the job by some margin. Jpegs are decent but RAW is the way to go for max details and for processing the best images at high ISO
Viewfinder is slightly higher magnification than the previous model (just a little but it's a good move) the view is a little bigger

GPS worked quite well but it can drain the battery a bit (though the battery life is quite good) it's ok accuracy wise but not as good as a car or hand held GPS (no GPS I've used in camera is dead on all the time) Still quite useful to have it
Wifi allows you to connect the camera to a smart phone or tablet, and you can control it remotely with an "app". It does have some basic functions available though it's not extensive, this might improve over time.

Handling is ok fairly comfy to hold though like the D3300 it lacks the dedicated buttons for WB and ISO, you can assign this to the FN button which improved things a bit. You can also access some quick settings on the rear LCD with the info button such as Raw/Jpeg settings, ISO, metering mode, and a fair few others. This does avoid a trip to the main menus which can slow you down operation wise.

AF system is the respected 39 point AF, using the D pad you can move between AF points making it quite easy and intuitive to use. I would prefer a larger viewfinder though, it's ok for a Pentamirror usable.

The optical low pass filter is gone just like other Nikon's this does give a tad more resolution (it's not a huge difference though) Image quality is very good, if you have the lenses that can take advantage of that the basic kit isn't really ideal here, but Nikon's affordable 35mm f1.8 G is a good one and can deliver nice sharp images, it's also very affordable and a must have lens for new users. (giving you a view of just over 50mm it's both fast and well worth picking one up)
Jpegs are quite good though you want to shoot raw for the best output possible, low light again it might be worth processing your own files for important shots. 24mp is a bit OTT for many users, you can of course though shoot jpegs and get good results from the camera, and you can reduce resolution to save some card/file space.

Some points to note, for users wanting to pick up older lenses (ie non AF-S or D type ones) the camera doesn't have a built in focus motor, this isn't a huge problem the majority of Nikon lenses have a built in motor in the lens, just something to watch out for. You can mount and use non AF-S/screw-drive lenses but you will have to manually focus (live view can help here)

Flash wise much like the D3300, you have to move up to the D7100 (or D7000) to enjoy Auto FP (high speed sync) this is useful for fill flash outside where you will exceed the camera's sync speed of 1/200 second. You can work around this with ND filters to cut the light down. CLS or wireless flash can't be controlled with the built in flash, but you can get radio triggers which can overcome this.

Nikon have designed it so that more advanced users who need these features move up to higher priced bodies (just decide if these areas are important to you when making your buying choice)
As a starter camera or something a bit more meaty to get your teeth into, this is a good camera in most respects. Image quality is very good, it's quite an easy camera to use and learn on. The articulated LCD is the main appeal if you are shooting videos or experimenting with photography with interesting angles (very low or high) it's a real plus to be able to move the LCD around as you wish.

Not a bad back up camera either just make sure it meets your needs.
Nikon didn't blow the barn doors off with this update, so if you have a D5200 and are happy with that, then stick with it. For new users this is a good camera which is a fun creative tool to use. Do look around though there are alternatives from other makers, each with their pros and cons.

Well worth looking at
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 13 June 2014
The D5300 is an update to the previous D5200 model, it 's not a revolution over the previous model but it is quite well featured in most respects, though for heavy flash users you might want to step up to the D7000/7100 which offer more functionality

It's a nice compact body, and a good introduction to photography.
A quick summary of the good and weaker areas

Pros:
+ Very good image quality from the 24mp CMOS sensor, no optical low pass filter makes for sharper images with a bit more resolution
+ Impressive 39 point AF system with 9 cross type sensors
+ Built-in Wi-Fi and GPS
+ 3.2" LCD screen with a meaty 1.04M dots very sharp and clear as well as articulated
+ 5fps is quite fast (buffer is about 8-9 shots Raw, about the same jpeg no so big but ok)
+ Good full HD movie mode with audio control and mic. input, sharp and clear video (some moire at times though)
+ Has MLU (mirror lock up) useful for macro and longer focal lengths
+ Good Auto ISO settings you can set a min shutter speed, or let it work on focal length (ie increase speed to match focal length used or reduce it for wider angle lenses) You can even tune it to faster or slower speeds. Very nice
+ Built in AF assist light is useful though can be a bit harsh for people subjects

Cons:
- No depth of field preview
- Won't autofocus screw drive lenses (non AF-S)
- Limited flash capabilities, no Auto FP (High speed sync), no native support of wireless flash (CLS) with built in flash
- Live view and movie AF could be quicker, cannot see real preview of aperture set until the shot is fired
- No vertical grip option (shame really third party ones might turn up though with some compromises)

D5300 v D3300 (main differences)

D5300 has an articulated LCD (which is also higher res)
39 point AF system with 9 cross type sensors v the 11 AF points on the D3300 (one cross type sensor)
D5300 has Wi-Fi and GPS built in, the D3300 has neither

Image quality wise the cameras are near enough identical (both have no optical low pass filter)

Some field notes:

Battery life is about 550-600 shots, though using the movie and live view will drain it more. Worth picking up a spare

Image quality is very good but you really need something a bit better to take advantage of the full 24mp resolution, the kit lens is ok but not really up to the job by some margin. Jpegs are decent but RAW is the way to go for max details and for processing the best images at high ISO
Viewfinder is slightly higher magnification than the previous model (just a little but it's a good move) the view is a little bigger

GPS worked quite well but it can drain the battery a bit (though the battery life is quite good) it's ok accuracy wise but not as good as a car or hand held GPS (no GPS I've used in camera is dead on all the time) Still quite useful to have it
Wifi allows you to connect the camera to a smart phone or tablet, and you can control it remotely with an "app". It does have some basic functions available though it's not extensive, this might improve over time.

Handling is ok fairly comfy to hold though like the D3300 it lacks the dedicated buttons for WB and ISO, you can assign this to the FN button which improved things a bit. You can also access some quick settings on the rear LCD with the info button such as Raw/Jpeg settings, ISO, metering mode, and a fair few others. This does avoid a trip to the main menus which can slow you down operation wise.

AF system is the respected 39 point AF, using the D pad you can move between AF points making it quite easy and intuitive to use. I would prefer a larger viewfinder though, it's ok for a Pentamirror usable.

The optical low pass filter is gone just like other Nikon's this does give a tad more resolution (it's not a huge difference though) Image quality is very good, if you have the lenses that can take advantage of that the basic kit isn't really ideal here, but Nikon's affordable 35mm f1.8 G is a good one and can deliver nice sharp images, it's also very affordable and a must have lens for new users. (giving you a view of just over 50mm it's both fast and well worth picking one up)
Jpegs are quite good though you want to shoot raw for the best output possible, low light again it might be worth processing your own files for important shots. 24mp is a bit OTT for many users, you can of course though shoot jpegs and get good results from the camera, and you can reduce resolution to save some card/file space.

Some points to note, for users wanting to pick up older lenses (ie non AF-S or D type ones) the camera doesn't have a built in focus motor, this isn't a huge problem the majority of Nikon lenses have a built in motor in the lens, just something to watch out for. You can mount and use non AF-S/screw-drive lenses but you will have to manually focus (live view can help here)

Flash wise much like the D3300, you have to move up to the D7100 (or D7000) to enjoy Auto FP (high speed sync) this is useful for fill flash outside where you will exceed the camera's sync speed of 1/200 second. You can work around this with ND filters to cut the light down. CLS or wireless flash can't be controlled with the built in flash, but you can get radio triggers which can overcome this.

Nikon have designed it so that more advanced users who need these features move up to higher priced bodies (just decide if these areas are important to you when making your buying choice)
As a starter camera or something a bit more meaty to get your teeth into, this is a good camera in most respects. Image quality is very good, it's quite an easy camera to use and learn on. The articulated LCD is the main appeal if you are shooting videos or experimenting with photography with interesting angles (very low or high) it's a real plus to be able to move the LCD around as you wish.

Not a bad back up camera either just make sure it meets your needs.
Nikon didn't blow the barn doors off with this update, so if you have a D5200 and are happy with that, then stick with it. For new users this is a good camera which is a fun creative tool to use. Do look around though there are alternatives from other makers, each with their pros and cons.

Well worth looking at
11 comment|23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Buying my new DSRL, has been one of the biggest decisions I have had to make so far this year.
I have been after a "good" camera for almost a decade and when my husband finally said "Buy it for your Birthday" I was very happy to start my search.
Like a child with a free pass in a toy store I began to search and compare many of the cameras available in the market, trying to decide where to spend my money, which model would be the right choice… At the end of the day one does not spend £500 on themselves every day (or at least me). So I needed to make sure I did not make a mistake.

My search turned out confusing, gave me many headaches and at one point I almost even gave up.
There's many articles on the web to help, "Which is the best camera for you?", "Best 2016 cameras"… the list is endless.
But even though I learned bits and pieces along the way, the more I read, the more confused I was.
After a lot of research and I mean reading article after article, product reviews, cameras specs… I made my choice: D5300.

This review is not technical, nor intended to help all those professional or enthusiast that could most surely teach me more than a few things.
This review is focused on all those customers who are after a good camera and do not know which one to choose.
Maybe my weeks search, and own experience, can help others make their choices a bit less daunting.

STEP 1 - Any brand or preference?
I looked at Fujifilm, Canon, Nikon and ended up searching for Nikon due to its track record of delivering solid cameras and lenses.

STEP 2 -What do you want your camera for? Any must haves?
From the start I knew I wanted a camera to take portraits of my children, beautiful pictures on our days out and that as a must have, it needed to have Wi-Fi.
So my 1st advice would be for you to think what do you want the camera for and what minimum specs or requirements you wish your camera to have. That will help narrow the search down.

STEP 3 and the most confusing: Compact / Bridge / DSRL
If you are looking for a basic camera which you can slip in your pocket or bag, take on a night out or take with the family on holiday, Nikon has an incredibly diverse array of simple-to-use compacts as all the Coolpix Range.
Prices can start from the £70 with a L30, and rise up to the £300 mark for a Nikon 1 J5, finding waterproof models on the way as Coolpix AW130.
The Nikon 1 J5 was my favourite compact camera, besides of the specs because it was on sale and seemed a good offer not to miss:
Nikon 1 J5 Compact System Camera - White (20.8 MP, 10 - 30 mm PD-Zoom Lens Kit, 4K Movie Shooting)

I have had compact cameras all my life, so I knew I was after something "more".
Besides I thought that for the price difference it was worth to carry on looking.

So I started looking at the Bridge cameras.
Bridge Cameras help you to get closer to the action, or in some cases, take manual control of your images without the need of changing lenses.
At first sounded like my ideal camera.
I had a look at Coolpix L340, Coolpix P610 and even new releases yet to be released as B500.
Why did I not go for a Bridge camera?
Two main reasons. Firstly because the 16MP was present and almost all the range, making me think that for once I was spending big money on a "good" camera I wanted more MP (although it would be very wrong to think that MP is everything)

And secondly because I learned the difference between RAW and JPEG format.
Raw format is the raw image, meaning more quality, more information in one image as the image does not get "compressed" into a JPEG format.
With a Raw image, you can work more with it, edit it more, giving you a wide angle of new possibilities.
I don’t edit all my pictures, but I wanted the quality of a raw format as well as the possibility to expand, learn more and do more with my pictures.

Once I knew I was after a DSRL model, that was the most simple choice for me.

I wanted to spend £500 to £600, including lenses, so the D5500 stopped me straight away and cameras as D7200 were out of my league.

As main options I had D3300, D5200 and my final choice D5300.
Neither the D3300 or the D5200 had Wi-Fi, so I made my final choice and started my D5300 journey.

Why do I like this camera and why do I think a beginner would benefit from having one too.

The D5300 is an DSRL entry level camera, it has many functions that I have discovered and many more I still have to learn.
1st thing I did was to buy the D5300 for Dummies (in case it helps, this is the link)
Nikon D5300 For Dummies

And my two lenses, one for portraits, 55-200 mm VR II on sale just over £100 mark
Nikon 20050 AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200 mm VR II Lens for Camera
and one for what I call, general photography, 18-55 mm VR II on sale for under £100
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Lens

I also must mention I bought the camera body and then the two lenses separately, because the lenses included in the kit are not VR (do not have vibration reduction).
We must all remember that Nikon bodies don't offer any form of in-camera image stabilisation.
The Nikon VR II range is a perfectly respectable introductory lens that will get out the door and snapping good photos in no time.
Compared to the previous versions, included in the camera with lens kit, the VR II is sharper and lighter.

VRII lenses have the vibration reduction technology which helps stabilise all images.
Just make sure you turn the image stabilisation off if you are shooting with a tripod as image stabilisation with tripod is not required and can affect the quality of the final picture.
The VR button is situated on the left side of the camera by the lens.

So, with camera and lens, I had more or less kept my budget, without all accessories ;)

Main points that me, a beginner likes about D5300
-D5300 can be set to auto mode
So I can experience the camera, play with it, learn with it, take shots with it and the camera adjust to the picture.
Handling and main settings are fairly easy once you simply navigate yourself through the menu.
The book I bought has also helped me set quite a few things up and understand my camera functions better.

At this point I must mention that the camera will auto-focus but you will need to "adjust/set" the lens mm manually.
Basically you manually set the "frame" of the picture, closer or further away by rotating the lens.
Once you have done that, the camera will auto-focus (at least on auto mode, it does)

-Size
It's large but compact at the same time.
I like how comfortable it is. For me it seems a good quality camera without the bulkiness of the more professional/expensive cameras.

-Raw and JPEG
I have set my camera to take pictures on both Raw and Jpeg format.
I have the raw format available on my SD card in case I ever want to edit, touch up or work with those pictures but I have the jpeg format so I can transfer those pictures straight to my Android phone.

-Wi-Fi
I have taken "photo-shoot" sessions of my girls on their Birthdays. On the same day, without having to turn my laptop or my All in One on, and without removing the SD card form my camera, I have transferred all pictures from the camera onto my phone.
Sharing instantly with friends and family, through apps as Whats….
The Nikon app is very easy to set up and work with and I love this instant access to my shots.

As I was buying my first DSRL the choice between Wi-Fi and not Wi-Fi was fairly easy.
Buying a better camera, with more functions (even if only a few) a newer model with Wi-Fi, for just over £100 was well worth the shot.

-Articulated LCD with a high resolution
I can move the screen to my picture needs, even been able to take family selfies easily with the help of a remote and tripod.
Now one of us is not missing while taking the picture and we can preview the shot on the screen before cutting someone's head off.
You can also take shots through your phone app without the need of a remote.

Of course the D5300 offers great video (which I have still not tried), GPS, and many more features which I have not mentioned.
But that is simply because I have not got to them as yet.
So far I have only been enjoying my new D5300 for two month's.

Must knows;

-Camera body is mainly made of high quality, shiny plastic. I love the look, my camera feels tough but "light".
-It arrived with an UK plug and a worldwide guarantee card.
You can call the number on the card (0800) or activate the Nikon guarantee online, which I recommend as you will receive a 2 year manufacturer guarantee instead of one.
If you the decide to take out an insurance plan for your camera (mechanical and accidental damage) the insurance will cost less.

What you must buy ASAP (in my opinion)

-A quality SD card
You must buy the SD card as it does not come with one.
I personally recommend ScanDisk, which at the moment is also on offer.
SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC UHS-U3 Memory Card

-A spare battery
I can shoot around 500 pictures, before I need to change my rechargeable battery.
Regardless of how long it lasts, I would recommend you all buy a spare battery.
The model required is: EN-EL14a
There are many batteries available, but in my opinion the original is always the best bet.
At the end of the day you have already spend a good amount of £… a few more will not make that much difference.
In case it helps, here's the original Nikon
Nikon EN-EL14a Lithium Ion Rechargeable Battery for Camera

-A lens cleaner
I bought this lenspens and it honestly works a treat if used with a blower
Lens are spotless with no effort whatsoever.
Lenspen New DSLR Pro Cleaning Kit for Camera

The blowers on sale seemed pricey, so I bought this kit:
K&F Concept® Professional Camera Lens Cleaning Kit for DSLR Cameras Canon Rebel EOS, Nikon, Olympus, Sony Alpha NEX, iPad,Samsung NX & Fuji DSLR 11 in 1 including Double Sided Lens Cleaning Pen /Empty Reusable Spray Bottle / Lens Brush / Air Blower /Cleaning Wipe/ Premium Microfibre Cleaning Cloths
I bought Option 1.
I use the blower to make sure my lens is spotless, the spray bottle to spray the room before I replace my lens and before I clean it.
The cloths I use to clean my daughter's glasses ;) I have just kept one just in case.

-A filter or a hood to protect your lens
The lens hood I bought the original Nikon HB-34 Bayonet Lens Hood
Nikon HB-34 Bayonet Lens Hood for AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED

And the UV filter I have bought this one, which is quite decent, but I have still not used it;
Polaroid Optics 52mm HD Multi Coated Glass 4 Piece Filter Set (UV, CPL, FLD, WARMING)

-A camera bag
I am not going to get started on those, as I actually bought around 5 camera bags before I chose the one that was best for my needs.
The camera bag is a very personal choice down to each of our tastes and preferences.
I personally bought this model, and my camera , my 2 lenses and my basic cleaning kit fit just fine;
Kattee Waterproof Vintage Retro PU Leather DSLR SLR Camera Case Bag Satchel (Small, Coffee)

As an overall I know I made the right choice with my D5300 and now I have a good camera which I can learn and progress with, without feeling stuck with the "that's it" feeling again that I have suffered with many compact cameras through the years.

I have mentioned over and over again the word "good" camera. The word good is in between brackets because I believe there are no bad cameras. There is a camera for each one of us... the hard bit is to find the right one for our needs.
I love the photography world, and with my very much loved D5300, I know I have made the correct choice.
I hope that makes sense ;)

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask just remember I'm an amateur.

I hope my review has been helpful to you, thanks for reading.
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on 30 July 2014
I admit I am not an expert, but of the several cameras I have used so far, this outshines the rest by some distance. For me, its simply the apparent quality of the photo that matters. I believe the quality here to be significantly better that say the D3200 - although that was also excellent (when used properly) and would be sufficient for most peoples needs. I attached my existing lens to this D5300 (Nikons: 18-70; 18-200; 35mm 1.8; 12-24 etc) and I was immediately (pleasantly) struck by the improvement in picture quality. I can only conclude that this is down to the sensor (along with the dropping of the optical low pass filter) in this camera - definitely a step up in sharpness and colour reproduction; especially a noticeable improvement with my Nikon 12-24 lens. If you can stretch to the D5300, I think it is worth it. I think it only can be the quality of your lens and your ability that will set the limits to your image clarity then. Absolutely 5 star. I don't really use the wi-fi or GPS so I can't comment on that.
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on 28 January 2015
I bought this Camera mainly for its video use as I currently own the Canon 600D, which although a decent camera it suffers from moire, aliasing, a less than perfect codec, and not so great ISO performance...and this is where the D5300 is MUCH better. I'm continued to be wowed by the quality this camera can produce. I feel like I should of bought a Nikon camera all along, but after hearing "Canon for video, Nikon for photo" I chose the Canon route, which I now feel was a big mistake. Seriously, the D5300 is probably the best crop sensor DSLR there is. The image quality is impressive! I couldn't be happier.
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on 14 February 2014
This is my first DSLR, my entry level, and I am not disappointed. Being a Nikon on its own is a major plus. High quality build and results, lots of lenses to choose from, great features, etc.

The Wi-Fi feature might not be what you find on your usual smartphone or table but it does what says on the tin - connects to smartphone or table, although via wi-fi only (setting connection needed) and enables you to browse camera gallery, download photos and even use your smartphone or tablet as a viewfinder! That is simply awesome! You can't adjust camera settings with the tablet but it is still very cool and useful for long distance photos, just like a live view remote. I use iPad and iPhone and it works wonderfully. I don't really use the GPS, so I cannot comment on it.

I purchased the standard kit, 18mm-55mm, and I have been playing with it on all sorts of conditions, but still getting used to the DSLR manual settings to get the best of this great camera. I have been visiting the Nikon site for more info and tips, and many forums and blogs - there is so much stuff out there you can learn from. Taking tips meant for a D5200 or even D3200 is good enough. The user interface on these is the same and so are most features.

I wish I could tell you more about this little monster but I am just a beginner as I said before. I have recently purchased the 35mm DX lenses for portraits and the extra background blur, and I'm loving it. Next I'll go for the zoom lenses to have a nice full kit around. I just need the time and the money to fund this little investment.

I wanted to purchase the red D5300 but the price put me off. In the end, I am actually happier with the classic black, as it looks so much smarter and it does not stand out. I don't really want to be waving this bad boy around when outside in the street, so I will also be using a regular messenger bad, with padding, to carry the necessary kit.

I have bought the extra EN-EL14a battery to carry around. I know from experience that this is probably your most valuable accessory to carry all the time - an extra fully charged battery. I strongly advise this to be your first purchase.

If you are purchasing one of these, I hope you will be as happy as I am. If you are not sure, do it like I did. Visit the shops, have a go in there, and study the various review websites and forums for real user experience sharing and reviews.

Enjoy!
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on 6 April 2015
Clearly this is a good camera. The myriad of good reviews proves this, the lack of bad ones speaks volumes.
So many people have done extensive reviews that I would only be mirroring, so I will stick to the basics and tell you why I like this camera.
The camera is a godsend where size and weight is concerned. My older D70 was a lot heavier and larger and was a pain to carry around all day. The D5300 is much easier to cart around with a larger lens attached.
GPS is an excellent addition. I use iPhoto on my Mac which instantly labels each photo with precise locations, this removes the need for my notebook and pencil.
Stick with Nikon optics and it's practically silent in use.
Articulated screen that can be hidden in use when needed.
Battery life excellent when used without the screen.
As an entry level camera, this is a bit above the norm. The improvements over the D3300 are worth having and the resolution is as much as you are ever likely to need.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 11 February 2016
Pro Photographer : I have all the pro kit that Nikon has to offer but these so called entry levels are fantastic not only for the money but for what they can do. Personally I would stick with the D5300 with GPS and Wi Fi instead of the newer D5500 without GPS, as there is arguably little change, especially if you do not need to use so many frames a second. I recommended this camera to my nephew last year and would recommend it to Colleges for students.

It has useful practical features that other more expensive cameras do not have (FX D750 now has). One very important feature being the tilting back screen that allows the camera to be stuck on a long pole with a cheap generic remote to take photo's above the crowds whilst other photographers fight to get the shot! Or for low shots! What else, high res images on 24MP sensor, ok so this is never going to be as similar resolution as an FX frame but who can tell with pro lenses attached. It will give excellent images and it is about the talent that is using the equipment not the equipment itself! A great picture is always a great picture and past photographers did not always have the sharpest of lenses to take their great pictures. Imagine that, some photographers in the past would be drooling over todays cameras and kit lenses. It has Wi Fi that allows sending images to a larger screen so that clients can view and to download direct to your computer and some limited control of the camera with iPhone.

Bare in mind that todays software can compensate for a lens or images inadequacies, that was not available even 2 decades ago. The camera is relatively cheap so scratches and dings do not need to be worried about.

We use this as a back up or when we need to get shots over obstacles so it comes highly recommended!
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on 12 June 2014
Like lot of other beginners into photography I was confused which DSLR to go for. It took me more than a month to get convinced that the Nikon D5300 was the best option at the time of purchase. I looked at all expert reviews (both Amazon and others) and pricing.

I ordered the camera with the standard 18-55mm Kit lens through Amazon prime, which was delivered the next day. The item was well packed. After charging the batteries I took the initial few trial shots (in auto mode) and I was impressed by the clarity of the images. Sharp and clear. The colours are bright and auto focus is fast.

Since then I am hooked to this camera. Although I am still learning, but I can say that its definitely holds the expectations and its all positive reviews out there. Now after 2 months of vigorous use I am starting to feel the need to get other lenses, but then Nikon gives a huge range to choose from.

At the time of purchase I was getting £60 cashback offer. I applied for the cashback on the Nikon website. After a week of submission only, I received a £ 60 pre-paid credit card valid at all shops & also in ATMs. So overall I please with the purchase and would definitely recommend.
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