Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars18
4.2 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 18 February 2014
In How to Develop Emotional Health Oliver James explains how bad parenting in children leads to adults having poor emotional health. He differentiates emotional health from mere happiness, as a state in which we cope with the demands of other people in a way that is healthy, instead of a hell is other people scenario that Sartre identified. Inasmuch James doesn't really put much forward as solutions to poor adult emotional health (apart from a few suggestions, but this only takes up a short amount of the total text) and instead concentrates on what parents can do for their children through how they approach the parenting process. He also talks about how being a success in life may not be everything and how emotional health and a loving upbringing can offer an alternative route. very good
0Comment|16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 February 2016
I read through a lot of this very quickly while sitting in bookshop waiting for my girlfriend to get out of work. The insights provided are useful and James obviously understands much about child development. As I went through I found many descriptions that could, in part at least, be applied to myself or people I know. Being emotionally flexible is healthy and James is clear about this. Understanding your past helps you to get on with the present; James is clear about this also.

The point where it all comes crashing down is when you've got to the end of the interesting anecdotes and are eagerly awaiting the advice that you so desperately need, namely, how to become more emotionally healthy, and the book stops.

It was with a growing sense of trepidation that I continued to read towards the end before leafing through a tiny section of practical tips and discovering that the advice given was shallow at best, and nothing more helpful than what a good friend could recommend. And I suppose it says something about myself that I found James's comments on early childhood and its significance faintly alarming to begin with.

I suppose one could say that dealing with people's mental illness via the proxy of a tiny book like this is a ridiculous concept, and they'd be right, but for a title such as the one given, I expected a lot more information in the practical vein.

Giving away too much useful information would have a negative impact on sales of these kinds of books, because the people reading them would get better. That is assuming that such a book could be written anyway.

My advice is to talk to friends if you can, talk to family if you can, CHALLENGE the negative assumptions you make, watch for a feeling of anxiety in your chest which will let you know when you're going wrong, and find a good therapist. I'm not so sure about books like these - maybe I'm a cynic.

Try to notice sadness and happiness and cultivate them both.

Keep trying.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 August 2014
Great insights, plain, clear & concise. Not wrapped in riddles, great price. Could do with more female theorist contributions. Happy
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 May 2014
enjoyed every word, helped me understand myself a bit more. Had I developed emotional health as a child and teenager, my life would have ended up very different.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 June 2014
This book was okay but I think it puts too much emphasis on your childhood in determining how your emotional health is today. I much more preferred Phillipa Berry's 'How To Stay Sane' in the same series of books by The School of Life.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 December 2014
Mr Oliver James is simply the best parenting author along with Penelope Leach, what they do for the humanity is just wonderful!
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 December 2014
What the hell... This might be a good read for people that are generally well but definitely this book won't give you any guidance on how to actually change your thinking if you are having any mental health issues. And then again, if you are perfectly fine and just need a boost of positive thinking - this book is simply a compilation of shallow 'how I struggled but now I am invincible' and really gives you no food for thought...
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 December 2014
A great read after "they fked you up " by the same author, no blame just understanding .
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 September 2015
I recommend this book to anyone who is struggling with their emotional health.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 June 2015
Great read - lots learn - well written.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)