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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glam overdose
Some oddities, some surprises, some standard stuff that you will have a million times already - but together with the nice booklet this, makes a great collection.
Published 13 months ago by Peter Robertshaw

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A missed opportunity
An impressive undertaking on the part of the compiler and it's interesting to see the compiler's take on pre-Glam and post-Glam. Maybe a bit of a missed opportunity though? A five-disc Glam box in which only two discs are dedicated to "Glam Proper" while the remaining three are dedicated to putting the other two in perspective - both historically and musically - strikes...
Published 13 months ago by nigeyb


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A missed opportunity, 9 Nov 2013
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An impressive undertaking on the part of the compiler and it's interesting to see the compiler's take on pre-Glam and post-Glam. Maybe a bit of a missed opportunity though? A five-disc Glam box in which only two discs are dedicated to "Glam Proper" while the remaining three are dedicated to putting the other two in perspective - both historically and musically - strikes me as undercooking the concept.

As in all musical genres, some of the best Glam tracks were recorded by those who were has-beens or were-never-gonna-bes. I'd prefer at least one disc dedicated to the one-offs who tried to cash in on the craze, leaving behind a lone stellar 45 before shuffling off back into complete and total obscurity. Some of this so-called Junk Shop Glam has been issued on other compilations, most notably the three key RPM Glam Junk Shop compilations: Boobs ~ The Junkshop Glam Discotheque, Velvet Tinmine ~ 20 Junkshop Glam Ravers, and Glitterbest - 20 Pre Punk & Glam Terrace Stompers. Some of these artists, or perhaps those from local Glam scenes that exploded elsewhere in Europe, would have made for a more satisfying compilation, and a more accurate reflection of the genre.

I would have included Gary Glitter's "Rock n Roll Part 2" which was a seminal Glam record in terms of defining the Glam sound. Mike Leander and Glitter creating the sound through hours of painstaking manipulation of tape loops and drum patterns. It is interesting to note that the compiler does include The Human League's version of "Rock n Roll Part 2" (that neatly segues into Iggy's Nightclubbing) which is a virtual copy of the original, and this suggests that the compiler recognises the track's significance but understandably didn't want to get embroiled in Gary Glitter controversy. As others have noted we do get "Angel Face" by The Glitter Band which is a good example of the Glitter/Leander sound and a great track too.

There's a few tracks on disc one (the pre-Glam CD) I'd take serious issue with. Patti Smith "Piss Factory"? I like it a lot but it's not even slightly glam. "Burundi Black"? Malcolm McLaren used it as the basis of Bow Wow Wow's drum sound and also played it to Adam Ant. You can hear the clear influence in "Kings Of The Wild Frontier" and "Dog Eat Dog". Quite what its relationship is to 1970's Glam though is unclear. Unless the "Oh Yes We Can Love" compiler is suggesting that the Ants are also Glam and included it on that basis. Personally I think the compiler is rewriting history, if he is trying to suggest it was an influence on 1970s Glam.

Discs four and five, which focus on punk, new wave and indie from the late 1970s onwards seem to be stretching the point. By disc five I have the feeling the compiler is simply inclined to find modern tracks which contain the word "Glam".

So overall, an interesting and worthwhile boxset but also a missed opportunity in terms of creating the definitive compilation - the key tracks could be contained on just two CDs.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Glam is Janus-Faced : True Glam and Glitter Pop, 7 Feb 2014
By 
Stephen E. Andrews "Writer" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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For me, there have always been two versions of Glam : the Glitter Pop of The Sweet, Gary Glitter and every pop star who ever wore bright clothes and slap while signing universally-applicable pop songs, and True Glam, the serious, arty, wider-culture referencing. more subjective and individualistic (hence Rock, not pop) work of Alice Cooper, David Bowie, The Stooges, Roxy Music and Cockney Rebel. It is this latter category that this box set arguably tries to capture some of the spirit of in some of the more vintage, tangential tracks on disc one (such as Coward and Brel). True Glam is always riddled with content that stems from the Modern Art (not contemporary art) and high culture that came out of Europe since the days of the decadents and symbolists, the same modern art that fled to New York when Hitler came knocking at its doors. Just one example of this is Roxy Music - the Weimar cabaret stylings of 'Bittersweet', chanson Romanticism of 'A Song For Europe' and the US pop-culture image consciousness of '2HB' are a handful of illustrations of this.

Unfortunately, this box set, while representing beautifully how Glitter Pop's sartorial excess and handful of musical indicators -descending chord sequences and crunchy tribal guitars and drums - spread across all musical subgenres of Pop in the 70s, even into disco (when the fact is that much of the Pop here has next to nothing in common with True Glam -which takes the Rock music of the counterculture and tears it into metallic, multi-coloured spattered violence, celebration of artifice and disdain for peace 'n' love) loses out by ignoring some very important figures. In particular, the presence of some of the poppier stuff here, which has very little relevance to either Glam strand, is almost offensive when one considers how artists such as Alice Cooper and Japan are conspicuous by their absence.

In his book on Glam, Barney Hoskins (part of the compilation team responsible for this box set), dismisses the mega-selling, pioneering Glam act Alice Cooper, which is maybe why the band (and the later works by the solo artist of the same name) are not included. The fact is that Alice Cooper were wearing women's clothes and makeup - plus they were referencing European modern art and writing Dadaist songs while outraging hippies with their punk attitude - long before Bowie or The Stooges. The evidence is there on disc and in photographs. But then a lot of rock critics favour fashion over chronology - and Alice Cooper have long been denied the critical acclaim deserved as Glam pioneers. In an interview with the Spiders' drummer Mick Woodmansey, the sticksman revealed how Bowie took the Spiders to see Alice Cooper when they first played in the UK to show why they needed to Glam up - their sparkling garage rock and over-the-top garb sent the girls in the audience into a frenzy and the rest is history. The fact that Bowie called his band 'The Spiders' is, in fact, a homage to Alice Cooper, who originally recorded under that name.

Another case in point is Japan '- alongside Ultravox (represented correctly in the set by two tracks), Japan were the proto-New Romantic bridge between Glam and the Blitz kid explosion of the early 80s. In fact the whole synth-pop movement of that period, when lots of makeup was worn, clothes were full of arty references and a meshing of high aesthetic and campy populism came together more successfully than they did in the True Glam/Glitter Pop era (it was sometimes harder to divide the artrockers from the popsters in the 80s) is wilfully neglected in this set. Japan were not only commercially successful, they were incredible to look at and their music was sublime - true successors to Bowie and Roxy. And yet they are missing here. Why?

While many of the bands represented here are highly relevant - Suede, Magazine, Morrissey,Goldfrapp even Judas Priest (drummer Les Binks was in Fancy previously and 'Take on the World' is pretty glitter pop despite its metal-anthem intentions) - the inclusion of disco artists and the exclusion of Alice and Japan -not to mention Mansun, Eno's solo material,early Visage and Gary Glitter- does nothing but undermine the validity of this box set. Noel Coward is highly relevant, but so are Berlin Cabaret songs, so why none of them? A bit of Utte Lempe and Nico would have provided equally relevant context.

So for now, as much fun as this box set is - and it is fun - it lacks authenticity because of some questionable selections and shocking exclusions (Cooper and Japan in particular are seminal True Glam). There is still room for a True Glam box set that puts the pop aside, puts the sartorial thing more into the shade and focuses on the spirit of the music - Anti-peace and love, Eurocentric, Modernist, Romantic, Existential and Post-Modern. It's also high time that the term Glam Rock was reserved for rock music
and Glitter Pop adopted as a label for the other stuff.

Still, it's the best thing of its kind to date, but two definitive box sets are needed -one for True Glam and one for Glitter Pop. Shame that True Glam, with its great meshing of Punk, Prog, Psychedelic and Electronic leanings continues to be lumped in with Glitter Pop under the overly-broad heading that is 'Glam Rock'
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don`t recommend it to be brought If you are a True ..., 24 Oct 2014
This should not be entitled as GLAM- There are very few Glam artists on Here, No Glitter Band or Gary Glitter- This is not Glam but an insult to all who have followed or Grown up With the Glam Rock/Glitter era of the 70`s. Don`t recommend it to be brought If you are a True GLAM ROCK FAN. YUK! selection of songs.!!!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glam overdose, 17 Nov 2013
By 
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Some oddities, some surprises, some standard stuff that you will have a million times already - but together with the nice booklet this, makes a great collection.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Poor Representation of Glam, 2 Nov 2013
Having grown up listening to Glam Rock and being an avid fan ever since I have long been waiting for a definitive compilation and I have to say this is definitely NOT it! I am not really sure who this album is aimed at but it certainly is not fans of Glam Rock because most fans will already have the small portion of standard glam classics on offer here (only 2 and a bit of the 5 sides are actually Glam Rock songs). The rest of the collection is made up of Rock'n Roll, Blues, New Wave & Punk, Heavy Metal, 60's Garage, Britpop, New Romantic, Indie, Goth & Disco. I assume whoever compiled this was hoping the more genres of music included the more music fans are likely to buy it. And whilst I appreciate the roots of Glam Rock are in Rock n Roll (you only have to listen to Gary Glitter, well you could if he wasn't airbrushed from history here!, Mud, Alvin Stardust, Suzi Quatro or The Rubettes to realise this) I find it difficult to comprehend the inclusion of the likes of Howlin Wolfe, The Fall, Boney M, Patti Smith, Judas Priest or The Sisters of Mercy. Indeed, I would suggest Goth was the complete opposite of Glam. Whilst Glam was all about fun, glitter & dressing flamboyantly, Goth is all about doom, gloom and death! By Side 5 I think the compilers have given up all together and just picked songs or artists with the word "Glam" in the title. This to me is a wasted opportunity. Ignoring the inclusion of artists such as Angel, Geordie, Alex Harvey, Mungo Jerry, Slik, Blackfoot Sue, Iron Virgin, Nick Gilder & the Heavy Metal Kids is a travesty and if this is supposed to be a history of Glam where are the examples of Bubblegum music that was the precursor to Glam and where are the bands that headed the Glam Rock explosion of the late 80's which was directly influenced by 70s Glam yet has been virtually ignored here. This box set could have included rare recordings by the original artists or lesser known cover versions of Glam Classics and there is still plenty of great obscure glam vinyl out there (some of which has made it onto compilations such as Blitzing the Ballroom, Velvet Tinmine and Killed by Glam) still yet to make it onto CD.
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5.0 out of 5 stars oh yes we can, 6 Jan 2014
By 
Mr. James S. Edmondson (u.k.) - See all my reviews
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subtle reference to bowie who is on this but with an obscure track I don't know. rest of it is great though.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars another numb-nut getting paid for knowing nothing, 3 Feb 2014
The trouble is with this box set is not the music - 80% of which is of course, great. No - its with the dummy or dummies behind it doing the compiling. I mean, honestly, where do they get these people? how do they get the job? do they actually get paid for doing things like this?

trying to be clever including people like noel coward and anthony newley (the latter presumably because of his influence on bowie) is really pretty desperate and also very, very contrived. of course - he/they have to of course also include howling wolf cos its where bolan lifted a bit of 'jeepster' etc. But so what? does that mean howling wolf is one of the forefathers of glam rock? did howling wolf dress up in stacked boots and lip gloss whilst trawling through the mississippi delta? ho hum

Then theres the otheres. Nazareth? judas priest? what the hell do they have to do with the movement? at the other end of the spectrum, barry blue? the bay city rollers?? kenny??? do me a favour please

And the we come up to modern times and now theyre really getting desperate. Morrissey? goldfrapp?the fall??? words fail me.

By far the most inexcusable act in this mockery of an album however is THE EXCLUSION OF GARY GLITTER!!!!!! gary was the epitome of glam rock and made some CLASSIC records and to ostacize him from it like he didnt even exist is truly, truly PATHETIC - and by the way, to all you holier-than-thou sun readers who will no doubt defend this action let me ask you this - how come jerry lee lewis isnt ostracized for maryying his 13 year old cousin? or bill wyman for having a go at the 13 year old mandy smith? and how about ANY of your idols from the 70's who ALL laid into 12/13/14 year old groupies in america in the 70's (thats right ALL)
- Remember all glitter did (supposedly) was get found looking at CP (and of course, none of you have have you?)- not nice maybe but a hell of a lot less than what 99% of his rock compatriots did. Real nice how theyve all turned their back on him aint it? Get your heads out of the gutter press and smell the truth

anyway - back to this comp - i cant tell you how sick and tired i am of these 'compilations' devised by these record company minnows who know NOTHING about the bands or eras concerned and care even less. Save your money - you should already own everything that matters from this genre anyway. Dont give any more money to these charlatans. And gary....youre still the leader mate
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Glam! Yes, Great!, 29 Oct 2013
By 
G. Hooper (London) - See all my reviews
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Ok, let's start with the Gary Glitter 'thing'.

Other reviewers suggest Glitter's absence from what is actually an excellent collection chronicling the singular world of glam rock, somehow entirely invalidates the 80-odd other tracks here. I very strongly disagree.

The reasons why Glitter is absent are both understandable and right given the very serious nature of his crimes. And by the way, the compilers do include Angel Face by the Glitter Band, thus giving an entirely respectable nod to early 70's glam - the very same territory occupied by the (solo artist) Gary Glitter.

So, what about the rest of this generous collection? Well, the first thing to say is it's about time someone did a decent and comprehensive retrospective of one of the most vibrant, joyous and, yes, sometimes slightly daft, indeed camp, musical genres. This is unquestionably the best collection of glam rock out there and I suspect it won't be bettered for many years to come.

What makes this set so good is the way the evolution of glam rock is explored and probed. The very first track is 'Mad Dogs and Englishmen' by NoŽl Coward and, yes, I know at this point you're thinking what I was thinking when I first saw this was the suggested, or perhaps more accurately, implied 'start' of glam rock - crazy! But, somehow, when you listen to Coward's clipped and stylised tones, followed by the remaining CD's in this collection, right up to modern day artists like Morrissey and Goldfrapp, then beginning with an arch English playwright, actor and singer, isn't crazy at all. It actually seems right.

It was a brave step by the people who put this box set together to commence with a song that is really associated with music hall, for I suspect they knew some would just turn away right there. But I am happy to tell you, here is one reviewer who urges you to stick with this collection for it will reward you handsomely. The compilers take you through a truly magical voyage of crunching chords and distinctive double drumming that is unmistakably all 'glam'.

It is simply not possible to comment on all the tracks here but I can say this; there is such variety one will certainly never get bored with this collection. It's also worth noting that although some artists in the collection are not perhaps labelled 'glam', their rightful inclusion demonstrates that, for all the sniffiness that is sometimes thrown at it, serious and highly influential musicians like Bowie, Mick Ronson, Lou Reed and Elton John were all proud to write and perform 'real' glam rock.

So, if you want to explore a brilliant musical style that remains, in my view, as relevant as any other out there, then buy this box set. Oh and yes, almost all of the songs on this 5-disc set will bring a big, wide smile to your face. Enjoy.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The ugly truth about glam, 29 Oct 2013
By 
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Yes, omitting Gary Glitter was a serious oversight.
However, that being said, many critics of this box set on the history of glam are avoiding the truth about glam
Sure, there were some great highly listenable classic albums, like Ziggy Stardust, Electric Warrior, and Desolation Boulevard
But, other than these and a few others, in a more minor way, the rest of glam was overly simplistic, repetitive, and only listenable in small doses
This box set reviews a broad history of glam, it's roots, and it's evolution, and it does a good job, and makes a fairly good case that some early Chuck Berry and Little Richard influenced glam in a significant way
Anyone who wants to enjoy the best of glam should listen to the aforementioned albums by Bowie, T-Rex, and Sweet, and look up a very limited few, but reasonable, works which fit this genre
The aim of this box set is to provide a thorough history, and other than missing Gary Glitter, it does a fairly good job in this respect
The only suggestion is that people be in the mood when they listen to the 5 discs, and for heavens sakes, listen in small doses, as too much sugar can get nauseating and lead to cavities!
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oh yes we can moan!, 2 Nov 2013
By 
H. Turnbull - See all my reviews
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First of all I would like to say that this box set makes a decent fist of covering what was a fairly diverse genre and all sorts of artists that went with it. And with a collection such as this, there was always going to be those disappointed that certain tracks or artists were ommitted. Even the compilers of this set in the accompanying book stated that, in putting all these tracks together, they looked forward to the debate it would inspire. And I for one would have loved for Rock & Roll part 2 to have been included but lets be brutally honest with ourselves here - we knew that no way was this (or any other GG track) going to be included and we all know why! So lets just get over it and feast on everything else thats here (and there is plenty of it!). This should in no way ruin the party for everybody else that appears here and there are some great memories here. The box set itself is of good quality - it is in exactly the same format/style that the 10cc Tenology box was put together for those interested in that sort of thing. The music is by and large great but I don't like every single track that is on there - but thats my personal taste! So four stars I think is fair and it would be churlish to give it a miserly 1 or 2 stars just because one track (or artist) is 'ommitted'. Oh yes, we can get over it!
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