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232 of 258 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My review - by Morrissey
Train, heave on to Euston. Awaiting the launch of my Autobiography, Penguin Books have incarcerated me in a tawdry penthouse flat at 6 Grosvenor Square. The harsh London light through the floor-to-ceiling windows peels my eyeballs, my feet wince at the coarse touch of the cashmere and angora carpet, and as I numb the pain with a third Grey Goose, my mind drifts back to...
Published 18 months ago by Rough Diamond

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115 of 133 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I couldn't put it down. But for all the wrong reasons..
There is a moment in his autobiography where Morrissey complains about the disappointment of his lunches with surviving members of the New York Dolls. They aren't at all interested in him, don't want to talk about the things that fascinate him about the Dolls and are just not the people that existed in his mind; a perfect allegory for this hugely disappointing and...
Published 17 months ago by Amazon Customer


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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deliciously vicious., 26 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Can't remember the last time I enjoyed a book this much. So entertaining you'll enjoy it even if you hate Stephen Patrick Morrissey.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Charming Man, 28 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
The wonderful thing about this beautiful, beguiling memoir is that, rather than simply presenting readers with a dull catalogue of 'facts' about his life, Morrissey provides a gloriously subjective analysis of his loves, hates and achievements in a prose style rich in arch, melodramatic elegance.
The first 50 pages in particular are a testament to Morrissey's stylistic prowess; his brutal schooldays are evoked with a kind of grim disbelief and his musings upon the Manchester of his youth are alive with sadness, beauty, humour and desperation.
For those expecting a measured, reasoned writing style which accords with such tiresome literary conventions as paragraphs, chapters and general coherence, you may find Morrissey's voice somewhat exhausting. In fact,exhaustion is a danger even for the seasoned Morrissey acolyte, for the lack of lip service paid to formal conventions do indeed wear the reader down, in ways which, I'm sure, are entirely intentional.
Of course, Morrissey's narcissistic inability to see things from other people's points of view is wonderfully present here, although perhaps 50 pages devoted to the infamous lawsuit between him and Mike Joyce is slightly unnecessary.
The most obvious absurdity here is the baffling recourse to Americanised spelling, which, for a cultural icon so irredeemably English as Morrissey, is simply unnerving. This is no doubt an editorial over-sight, but is certainly is a fairly ironic one.
Buy this book in order to revel in the outpourings of a truly original artist; it will provide you with a presumably much-needed respite from the lifeless, flabby witterings with which the majority of celeb autobiography is so tarnished.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful read about a uniquely talented man, 11 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Speedy delivery thanks. A wonderful read about a uniquely talented man.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great writer with a great story to tell, 14 Nov. 2013
By 
Sam Holliday "saminblack" (Bath) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Just finished this last night and have to say it was a brilliant read.
I have always thought of Morrissey as great British eccentric admired only be we foible-understanding fellow Brits, but it is revealing how, just like a prophet is never regarded in his home town, he seems to be far more appreciated abroad than he is at home.
Like the best autobiographies you learn far more about the subject than just what he is famous for and the amazing description of his Manchester school life in the early 70s for instance looks like it could have been taken from a Dickens novel.
The Smiths/solo career stories are also great as is his bewildering array of encounters with the rich and powerful (The last of the famous international playboys?) most of which leave him cold and unimpressed.
It's a great story full of insight, witty one-liners and the occasional barefaced bitching but above all it is a beautifully told tale and the man has a lyricism and charm in his writing he so often shows in his music.
It meanders a bit (hey, I can talk as this post shows!!) but like everything he has ever done you can love it or hate it but you will have to grudgingly admit it is original. A true British icon I think - and a top book to tell Santa about.
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6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Morrissey reveals a little and does it perfectly, 17 Oct. 2013
By 
Monica (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Spent all last night reading this classic, and yes it is. I have never downloaded a book before as well as buying a physical copy. Morrissey does not disappoint and in fact I found the whole book inspirational. More to follow.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Morrissey - Autobiography., 11 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
I have read so many negative reviews of , Morrisseys , Autobiography, and i want to give anyone considering buying this book another viewpoint. First of all the critics seem unhappy with the following - That this was written by Morrissey in the first place and so rather strangely sounds like, Morrissey, with his views and outlook on life. The critics seem unhappy with the books layout eg begins with, Morrisseys, upbringing in, Manchester, and lingers there for an awful long time, he then spends less time on the Smiths, and then a bit more on his Solo career. Lastly the critics are not happy that, Morrissey, demanded that this book be published on the, " Penguin Classics " label. Well although i am not finished the book yet i believe that i can answer all of the above and encourage you to buy and read this book. Yes not surprisingly this book sounds like, Morrissey, but despite what the critics say, he is not, spiteful or cruel, but , honest and open, displaying great love and affection for those who can show it honestly. What most people seem unable to grasp is that, Morrisseys, upbringing in, Manchester, was and is, The Smiths, his experiences and viewpoints of life around him all contribute to the, sound and outlook, of, The Smiths. So you are not being " cheated " out of more useless , Smiths, information. In fact i can now re-listen to my, Smiths, records/cds and gain more from them than ever before. As for the " Classics" title, well i honestly believe that, Morrissey, is using this book as a sign of respect for the Penguin series and anyway why waste time - this book will become a modern Classic.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars IT TAKES "GOOTS" TO BE GENTLE AND KIND, 29 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Morrissey's biography might have been made first available, as good study books are, properly stitched in hardback with an index; rather than suffering the big print-run obsequies with which Penguin favour the works of Homer, in their "Classic" series. The Folio Society, one day will give our hero the cemetery gates and the Robert Graves treatment. Larder Dah Da.

NME familiars have just declared that "The Queen Is Dead" is the greatest album of all time. Lou Reed died yesterday. Such news pales behind the revelation that Johnny Marr's favourite band was Pentangle. Earnestly supported by an early incarnation of the perverse John Peel; and by a Melody Maker that still dreamed of a return of "big bands"; with "Light Flight" Pentangle had just one hit. From the song's chorus: "Ba - da - pa do da; da - ba - pa do da da"; Morrissey himself doubtless, learned how to spurn the source of inspiration and fill in for words that he'd never know. We can check out this group now on a computer; and hear that irritating song; and observe that The Smiths might have learned that Pentangle had something more to teach about the rapacious record industry alongside their intricate guitar chords and the circle of fifths. "Transatlantic withheld royalty payments from the Pentangle albums... their manager, made it clear that their contract with him included a clause that they could not sue him "for anything under any circumstances"". It is a side of the record business that John Peel never mentioned once in the many years I courted him for direction. Peel should never more be associated with the early success of The Smiths. Morrissey came across the disingenuous presenter "two times, and both in motorway service stations but he shyly has nothing to say on both occasions". It is revealed that Peel never saw the band once live or attended their fabled radio broadcasts. John Walters is given the credit.

Beyond the many palpable record label injustices, "Biography" makes clear, that manager Geoff Travis held back release of "The Queen is Dead" for nine months to establish that "Hatful of Hollow", enhanced as it was with underpant blue, (Pantone 284) was not to be regarded as an album under contract. The contributions of drummer and bass player deserve the heartfelt praise that Morrissey favours them with throughout the book; but only a judge, beyond the pale, could decree that they deserve the same royalties as Morrissey and Marr. This is judgment that, in selling Van Gogh, the forebears of Daler-Rowney were entitled to benefit because they were instrumental in furnishing the artist with canvas. The damage done to Morrissey by this injustice; and the pain of legal wrangles, is never far away. Yet, Morrissey can bleat about how the world treats him; he can harp on that Rough Trade Records spared promotion back in the beginning; but only Morrissey could besmirch his own canvas with "Kill Uncle". If he'd not been so tasteless, misguided or appalling at this critical time in his solo career he could have met the future demands of Mike Joyce out of petty cash. In fairness Morrissey does apologise for spawning this monstrosity; he can "forgive" Mike Joyce but Morrissey is incapable of crediting Joyce with listening to the words. The drummer turned out to be a shop-lifter after all.

"They're writing songs of love but not for me". Morrissey describes himself, at the close of his often hilarious opus as one who presents himself "everywhere by way of apology". The feeling of being left out has often been celebrated but, until Morrissey's lyrics, and to a fault in "Autobiography", never so earnestly defended. Emily Dickinson, another "funny Valentine", advised that truth, always a little hard to grasp, should be presented "slant". More profligate, Morrissey prefers telling it "like it is". He reveals a confidence given him personally by the mother of Lesley Ann Downey: Emlyn Williams who wrote "Beyond Belief", an important book for Morrissey, about The Moors Murderers, asked for a sample of the murdered girl's knickers. While for a moment this is riveting, the truth is, and this is made clear in the best writing in the book; the basis of Morrissey's art is REVENGE disguised as truth-telling and "love". This change of heart towards Emlyn Williams makes him feel guilty; but what is disturbing is not that he likes this feeling, but offers it up like a sacrifice, as entertainment.

Along with Rolling Stone magazine; Sarah Ferguson; The Algonquin Hotel cockroaches and Johnny Depp; Sandie Shaw's mean slice of toast is castigated. Siouxsie is, at length, dismissed with entertaining relish: "she might stare you out as you lay dying on a zebra crossing". Morrissey raises his game for the section on Julie Burchill "pitifully late-middle-aged legs (no chance of a Rich Tea biscuit)"; and Marc Bolan is reminded, where he is looking down with Stacey Grove from Heaven that he declared "Oooh no!" when our nubile biographer summoned the effrontery to ask for an autograph. However, perhaps on legal advice from Penguin "the failed Manchester musician under an assumed name" is not named.

The final words of the actual text of Morrissey's proud work of art are:

"A wintry Chicago street scene in December 2011....As I board the tour bus, a fired encore is still ringing in my ears, and then suddenly a separated female voice calls out to me - full of cracked now-or-never embarrassment above the still Illinois winter atmosphere of midnight, and it was dark, and I looked the other way".

In "Broken Time", one of the first books to be written about his lover dying of "Aids", the author's last words are: "this calamity that is all mine". We speak in rhyme at moments of passion, and moments of departure and death. I wonder if even the poet knew how much of himself he has given away, still ill, as he kissed his own remarkable work, goodbye once more, over and over: "still Illinois".
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Morrissey proves himself to be just as vacuous and self-absorbed as his detractors always said he was, 30 Jan. 2014
By 
Craigganmore (Chepstow, Wales) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
I've loved Morrissey for as long as I have loved music; from Strangeways, Here I Come to Years of Refusal I have bought the albums and placed the burden on myself to love the music, making excuses to friends for Steven's outlandish comments. But this books has opened my eyes. This book paints himself as someone, after all the attempts at poetry that, without the musical wit of Alain Whyte or Johnny Marr, would sit alongside so many teenage bedroom poets, who is basically an ignoramus. No education and no interest in engaging in the world outside of his profession and he just seems completely redolent of self-pity. Having excused him for so long it feels a slight betrayal to find, in his own, words Steven confirming himself to be the man that so many people said he was and I have argued against for so long. I've learnt my lesson well now though and I will never, ever buy a Morrissey album again for as long as I live.

Anybody know if Alain Whyte has released anything recently? That might be worth listening to...
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars unbelievably good, 31 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
Not sure what I expected, but you can't put this book down. Morrissey starts by evoking the 70's with heartwrenching realism, and from there it just gets better. Two days on from finishing it I still can't believe he managed this tour de force. People who say this needs an editor just don't get it - who could presume to control the mighty wit of the man? There isn't a word out of place - I found myself laughing out loud at so many of his anecdotes- and how often does that happen once you've passed your teens? His description of Julie Burchill in her lair is fabulously funny - and not just a bit catty - but does Morrissey care? He does not.

To those who are disappointed not to be told how he wrote 'Girlfriend in a Coma' - sorry, but he probably doesn't know himself. Such a thing as a 'Smiths by Numbers Guide' - could never exist.

What's that phrase I'm looking for? Genius does what it must, talent does what it can.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A guide to Smithdom and beyond, 7 Nov. 2013
By 
P. F. Clayden "pclayden" (Dizzy London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
I've loved Morrissey and The Smiths since 1983 and this majestic missive has re-kindled the fire and the pleasure of listening to the albums and singles again.

Fair play to Morrissey - he has used the book to hopefully cathartic effect. Rather then re-write history he has returned to areas already quite well covered. I think that the trial bit is harrowing - the guy who produced such great music betrayed by the hideous UK legal system and, disgustingly, deprived of future Smiths Royalties!

Hopefully Royalties from this successful book will make up some of the shortfall!

It reads fantastically well with an adrenaline rush of pure passion. No use of the horrible "C" word although must have been tempting. The book seems to be full of them.

Hopefully the future will see many more great songs from Morrissey.
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