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2.9 out of 5 stars
Le Week-End [DVD]
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 November 2014
Nick and Meg are a British couple celebrating their 30th wedding anniversary with a weekend getaway in Paris.

As they travel around the city, they revisit the highs and lows of their relationship, fight about their faults, and continue to run out of restaurants without paying the bill.

They meet up with an old colleague of Nick's and attend a dinner party at his house, leading to some painful truths being spoken aloud......

Imagine films like Saturday Night, Sunday Morning, or Up The Junction, and take the characters from those films, forward it thirty years, and you have Nick and Meg. Its a kitchen sink drama, but in the middle class, and this is the films point of interest.

Broadbent and Duncan are effortless as the twenty something's trapped in their ageing bodies, and sometimes it's really heart wrenching when Meg is being Abhorrent toward Nick and their relationship.

But the relationship is just so real. Its as if you are watching an actual married couple on screen, and just when you think things are looking up for the couple, we have Jeff Goldblum appearing as an old colleague of Nicks, sparking something up again.

Its a wonderful little film, with some great performances, and the scene at the dinner table is both heart warming, and crushing.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on 9 April 2014
I was very nearly put off by the reviews here, but decided to buy anyway as often indi films that get poor reviews turn out to be excellent. This was a superbly acted gem of a film, touching but not one shred of sentimentality; instead we are treated to an intimate journey along with a couple to Paris for the weekend. Yes there is pain, regret, dissatisfaction, but there is also hope, love, loyalty, fun & truth. I thought the touching way that their love shines through was charming & poignant. It was easy to believe in the characters, loved the dinner party scene, Jim Broadbent' s speech is brilliantly done. This is not for those who like their love scenes wrapped up with candy kisses a la Hollywood, but for those who like simple, beautifully observed moments in ordinary life's, you will not regret seeing this. British cinema at its best.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 18 April 2014
I was so looking forward to 'Le Week-End'; a film which transports a late middle aged husband and wife back to the Paris of their youth to celebrate their thirtieth wedding anniversary and see what has changed. I was expecting to be able to delight in the Parisian setting and reflect on a philosophical dimension to a film exploring the passage of time. However, there was little to appeal in this film which focuses on a nauseatingly middle class and self-centred wife, her unfortunate husband and their uniniteresting trip. If we are supposed to be charmed as they re-live their youthful recklessness by leaving a restaurant without paying, well, frankly I wasn't!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 10 November 2014
I am intrigued by the way this film has divided opinion almost equally straight down the five ratings. It just goes to show how reactions to the same film can be totally different. For me, it's a bit of a curate's egg. There is some delightful comedy in it, for example when the 50s something couple are seeking a restaurant in which to have dinner, and there are some exchanges between them that touch perceptively on the strains of married life, especially after 30 years. But there is something basically unsatisfactory about it ; it does not quite ring true, the tone veers disconcertingly from one mood to another and the way it simply stops (after the pair have absconded from the luxury hotel where they have racked up a hefty bill) leaves this viewer, at least, unsatisfied. Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan, good pros both, are always worth watching but, overall, I don't see this as a classic to be returned to. Just about worth three stars, I think.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A train, where we observe people, and finally to an older couple, the woman reading, the man acting anxious, touching his pockets to make sure the Euros and their travel plans are all set. Our introduction to Lindsay Duncan as Meg Burrows and Jim Broadbent as Nick Burrows. They are on their way to Paris for an anniversary weekend.

We find out soon enough that in this 30 year marriage, all is not well. They end up at an hotel where they once stayed 30 years ago, and Meg refuses to stay. Off they go in a taxi looking at the sights of Paris and end up in a very expensive hotel suite. This is a weekend to rev up their marriage, and it sounds like they need something. Nick mentions that Meg has not been available for love making for 5-10 years. Meg is cruel and downright nasty to him. They do have some fun, but it is not until an old college friend of Nick's runs into them. Morgan played by Jeff Goldblum is a well to do artist living with his new, pregnant wife. He invites them for dinner.

Now, things go downhill and then uphill again. Nick and Meg have things to say, and they do. This is a fine film of an older marriage, and the actors are superb. Usually Jim Broadbent plays a feeble older man. In this film he is in fine form, a welcome nuance. Lindsay Duncan is a joy. I have watched her in the new TV series, 'The Honorable Woman', a small part, but she is recognizable and unforgettable. Jeff Goldblum is perfect in this part. All in all, a film many married when revel in.

Recommended. prisrob 09-12-14
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 March 2015
This follows older couple, Meg and Nick on an anniversary break to Paris. It worked well enough at first showing them travelling by Eurostar, fussing over who has the Euros or the passports. Then as an English middle-class couple indulging in the French fantasy it was well observed. We see them spending an age choosing a restaurant for lunch, dismissing anything too modern or touristy, ooh-ing and ahh-ing over ever every mouthful of food.
Everything it not perfect, they have the irritations any couple with their long-standing relationship carry around, they also have money worries and an indolent grown up son back at home, but this all adds to the feeling of following a real-ish couple not always pulling together.
Where it goes down is the increasing lack of empathy I felt for them as the film went on. Splurging on the plastic to treat yourself to a nicer hotel is fine and taking time to think about the good and bad things in your life is healthy, but they came across in the end like spoilt kids feeling short changed by life not living up to their expectations. And doing a runner from restaurants is not big or clever - it will always come out of the already under paid staff wages.
It was well shot and acted overall but limited by the plot and character development.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 3 December 2014
This is one of the poorest films that I have ever watched. It made pathetic attempts to be profound but failed miserably. I would not recommend it to anyone, having just wasted my time watching it in the hope that it would get slightly better, at least. The very weak story line at the beginning of the film got gradually weaker, so the sudden end was not so much a shock as a gradual prolonged death.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 April 2015
Oh dear. This film sounded such a good premise I was really looking forward to it. Sadly after a quite promising beginning it descended in a mess of tedious, self-centre, middle class angst and I was rather glad when it ended.

So the two stars - Jim Broadbent was totally believable and his character a rather charming buffoon. Second star - there are some great (but not enough) shots of Paris. There were some charming flashes of the couple trying to re-discover their carefree youth but these moments were few and far between.

The film culminates in a stifling intellectual dinner party that left be totally froid I'm afraid. As a set piece it ain't no Osage County. I couldn't but compare with Shirley Valentine which addresses similar issues of growing old and unfulfilled ambition. I wish I had watched that instead.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 17 July 2014
Kureshi still confusing his self importance as talent and coming up with the usual jumble of throw as many things together and people might not notice lack of coherent characters or plot.
Although the average day of an average couple may will go through all sorts of mood swings that doesn't make it worth watching.
Jim Broadbent is his usual reliable self but even he must have wondered if they were making it up as they go along, Lindsay Duncan has to struggle with a character who claims that she is not bipolar but tripolar while Jeff Goldbum has barely 10 minutes screen time but his seems to be the only genuine character.
The slight saving grace is the homage to Bande a Part (Tarantino named his film company after it), but little that happens through the first hour leads up to the ending.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 February 2015
What a disappointment this film is. You would think that with such an esteemed cast it would but a winner but sadly no. The acting is ok but the story and characters are so unbelievable it really isn't worth seeing. The female character is downright evil towards her partner that it is impossible to think he stays with her at all. They spend money as if there is no tomorrow and then are surprised that they cannot pay the bill for the hotel.
To crown it all the ending is nonsense: we are in deep sh.. so let's dance, really how likely is that?
On top of it all it also really sad to see the two lead actors rant and rave about the script. Are they that desparate for work?
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