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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine movie...and it's possible to enjoy Altman's Philip Marlowe as much as Chandler's Philip Marlowe
Terry Lennox has a problem. He's in trouble and needs help getting out of the country. Who else can he go to than one of his best friends, Philip Marlowe? All he asks is that Marlowe drive him down to Tijuana...right now. Marlowe, a private eye who probably has few good friends other than Lennox, does it. When Marlowe gets back hours later, he's picked up by the cops,...
Published on 5 Jun 2007 by C. O. DeRiemer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray could have used additional Q.C.
A great Robert Altman movie, currently unavailable on Blu-ray in the U.S. Arrow has done a spectacular job with the packaging - the booklet is stuffed with essays, interviews, etc. But the movie visuals are seriously flawed. In the scene where Marlowe arrives at the party and a group of people are singing and playing the piano, a white splotch of missing picture...
Published 5 months ago by Taylor B. Jessen


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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Long Goodbye, 30 Dec 2013
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This review is from: The Long Goodbye [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Bought as a present which was much appreciated. I would definitely reccommend this to people who like edgy detective films.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Long Goofbye, 18 Sep 2011
I havent read the book, i therefore cant compare the two, the film itself stands alone as a great film. Elliott Gould is wonderfully cast and plays the part of marlowe with terrific cool as the film follows his path with suspense maintained till the very end.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Long Goodbye, 12 Aug 2011
There are spoilers in this post, specifically at the end of paragraph three.

The Long Goodbye, Robert Altman's adaptation of Raymond Chandler's final published novel in the Phillip Marlowe Mysteries series. Phillip Marlowe, the troubled, chain smoking, excessive drinking private dick is played by Elliot Gould (Friends, M*A*S*H).

Robert Altman has taken Phillip Marlowe from his 1950's setting of the Raymond Chandler novels, and placed him in the 1970's living amongst a group of hippie birds who spend the entire film topless and baked. Marlowe's fish out of water nature is shown through his old car, references to old movie stars (albeit, Jimmy Stewart) and his interest in jazz. The music is the most interesting feature of the entire film, the music composed by John Williams (Star Wars and Indiana Jones) and performed by Jack Sheldon.

The plot follows the disappearance of Marlowe's best friend Terry Lennox, the death of Terry Lennox's wife, a rich Malibu beach community couple, a lifestyle hospital, the L.A. police and L.A. gangsters who Lennox owes $250,000. However, none of the aforementioned are neatly woven, and the story is never as complex and interesting as Chandler's novels are. This is the greatest shame of this spirited adaptation. The female half of the Malibu beach community couple is Eileen Wade, who gives Marlowe his biggest breakthrough in his case with little to no detective interrogation, panache or wit which the Phillip Marlowe of the novel series uses in obtaining information from witnesses, suspects and police. For example, Eileen Wade gives up the information that "Yeah, Roger Killed (Terry Lennox's) wife" and "Yeah, Terry Lennox is alive".

Elliot Gould's performance is entertaining and offers a different take on Chandler's anti-hero, and Altman's movie is anaesthetically pleasing, but the major let down, which ruins the entire adaptation is the lack of an exciting & challenging plot and witty screenplay.
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9 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Special features, anyone?, 14 July 2004
By A Customer
I'm sorry, did we offend someone? We don't have the empire anymore, but does that mean we should we be treated like you scraped us from the bottom of your shoe? Yes, you, America, who has released this disc on the R2 public without the special features bestowed so benevolently upon the US disc. Why? If you've got 'em, flaunt 'em.
Altman's film is something of a divertissment, but is better than the rubbish around today. Quite bizarre. The picture strobes a bit when people move. As I've already kvetched, we have been deprived of the opportunity to hear the cinemaphotographer discuss his work.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Did not meet expectations, 20 Nov 2009
I enjoy films and books in equal measure and recognise that it is seldom possible for a film to faithfully follow all the twists and turns of a well crafted novel. Quite often I forget that I've read the book and become totally immersed in the film version, thus doubling my enjoyment of the story.

Consequently, I can forgive `The Long Goodbye' for not adhering to the original story but to be subjected to under strength individual performances, long, meaningless scenes that add little to the flow of the story and stilted, mumbling dialogue is, in my view, totally unforgivable.

For great swathes of the film, I got the impression that little actual dialogue was written for the actors to memorise. Instead, I had the distinct impression that Robert Altman screamed from the sidelines, "Talk tough Elliott, mumble more. No, no it doesn't matter what you say - if you get stuck, light another Marlborough" "Sterling, sweetie, just remember you are Ernest Hemingway, act tough and keep drinking, and mumble more than Elliott - you are the man". Everyone else played roles that they had obviously learned for other movies and Nina van Pallandt's effort was so wooden that I half expected her nose to grow as she lied her way through the storyline.

And, what were those half-naked girls all about. Was it the only way the film could ensure an 18 certificate to excite the interest of the cinema going public. I would have given it an 18 for the endless repetition of the `specially written' theme song that was murdered by a succession of singers and musicians - or for the scene where Arnie gets his kit off.

Having said this, I will keep the film in my collection and watch it again. With all those famous names involved there must be something to admire and I obviously missed it on first viewing.
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7 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very poor adaption of a great classic, 8 Jan 2011
Marlowe as written by Chandler was the hero in a foul world. But although I liked Gould' performance, this adaption by Altman is a fouling of the name of Marlowe. Changing the polt is fine. But changing the character so much as to be nothing like that written is pointless. Why use the story and the character if you want to throw it out the window. This is a very long, rambling, tedious movie. I was quite disapointed. I think only obsessed fans of Altman would enjoy this movie. The rambling dialoge, rather than the tight, taut dialogue by Chandler, follows Alman's usual pattern of filming his actors seemingly improvise his lines. It might make for realism, but also for tedium. Don't waste your money on it. Gould isn't too bad, and he does a great audio book of The Long Goodbye, but this movie is a boring.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Better Luck Next Time, Mr. Chandler, 11 Dec 2011
By 
Stephanie De Pue (Wilmington, NC USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Robert Altman's THE LONG GOODBYE was released in 1973. It's based on Raymond Chandler's penultimate novel of the same name The Long Good-bye; is generally considered a film noir classic. It follows Chandler's convoluted plot, kinda sorta, and is, of course, filmed in color: there's a school that says that movies based in Los Angeles, as this one is, may succeed as films noir despite being filmed in color.

Chandler's book was adapted for the screen by Leigh Brackett, who also did the honors for the 1946 Warner Brothers' Humphrey Bogart adaptation of the author's The Big Sleep [1946] [DVD]. Here, the action is moved from Chandler's L.A. of the 1940's to the city's 1979's, mean, drug-addled. After the murders committed by Charlie Manson's crew, and the motorcycling Hell's Angels at the Rolling Stones" Altamont concert. The city has begun to awake from its long dream of drugs, sex, and rock and roll. The film's cinematography, by the talented Hungarian refugee Vilmos Zsigmond, who also did Altman's Mccabe and Mrs. Miller [DVD] [1971] captures the look of the city frozen at that time. Harsh sun, bleached colors, threatening pastels. And Altman's camera moves constantly. The many times honored John T. Williams did the sound track, and a witty one it is, too. That theme song pops up all over the place, from supermarket Musack to Mexican, party singalong to piano jazz.

The story concerns Philip Marlowe's decision to help a friend. Marlowe, here played by Elliott Gould,Ocean's Thirteen [DVD] [2007] helps Terry Lennox (played by Jim Bouton) to get to Mexico. Lennox will be accused of killing his wife and stealing a large sum of mob money. For his trouble, Marlowe is beaten up, and jailed for several days. Then, what is apparently another job takes him to a guarded, ritzy Malibu beach community, that is, in fact, the site of the murder of Lennox's wife. The gatekeeper does movie star impersonations, nobody is actually the person he/she presents to the world, and several residents have taken screen star type names. His clients on this job are Sterling Hayden,(Doctor Strangelove (Collectors Edition) [DVD] [2002]) as an alcoholic, Hemingwayesque famous writer, Roger Wade, born Billy Joe Smith. And Nina Van Pallandt, former model, and mistress to that most famous of 1970's hoaxers, author Clifford Irving (he counterfeited a Howard Hughes autobiography). She plays Wade's downtrodden wife Eileen.

Altman was an offbeat kind of guy, and his casting of this movie is, too. Most of the lead parts are played by non-actors: Van Pallandt; Jim Bouton, former New York Yankees star pitcher as Lennox, born Lenny Potts; Mark Rydell, producer-director, as psychotic gangster-gambler Marty Augustine. Henry Gibson,stand-up comic from Rowan and Martin's television show LAUGH IN as the oily Dr.Verringer. Arnold Schwarzenegger, bodybuilder then, in an unbilled, hardly speaking part. These people evidently do as they were directed to do, and deliver their lines, as does David Carradine in a bit, unbilled part as Marlowe's jail roommate. But the leads, Elliott Gould and Sterling Hayden, must have been encouraged to improvise. They talk constantly, and, in the Altman way, frequently at cross-purposes, to deliver what must surely have been the least disciplined performances of their careers.

Frankly, to watch the film again after a hiatus of several years, you can't help noticing that it's virtually two hours long. And that these self-indulgent, undisciplined performances are annoying and tedious, two things a movie of a Raymond Chandler novel should never be. Well, many Chandler books have been filmed more than once, so, with regrets, here's hoping Chandler has better luck next time.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Review of DVD, 5 May 2009
By 
E. Jones "ed stream" (Shropshire UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Before you purchase this film remember that it was produced in 1973. The film techniques reflect that age so be tolerant!
If you have read Ray Chandler 'Marlowe' books you will have your own 'image' of him so this could be a disappointment - it was not for me as Elliott Gould portrays that laconic style I think we all believe exists with Marlowe. However be prepared to see a very different story! NOT true to the book, with a very different outcome and different scenes along the way. Probably best to read the book first, wait a while then watch the DVD, for a different story experience!
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3 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Should be the 'Long Goneandforgotten'., 29 May 2013
I can't speak for the man, but I don't believe Raymond Chandler would have been pleased with this characterisation of his novel. It can't be compared directly to the book, and as a film in it's own right it is barely passable, but if you liked the book you will be disappointed with this interpretation. I am a fan of Elliot Gould, but his best work this most defintely isn't. I am a big fan of Chandler, and this left me out in the cold.
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1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the long goodbye (dvd), 3 April 2009
Arrived within stated time. It was well packaged. It was in excellent condition. It's okay with me.
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The Long Goodbye [Blu-ray]
The Long Goodbye [Blu-ray] by Robert Altman (Blu-ray - 2013)
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