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5.0 out of 5 stars A psychological analysis of God, 12 Aug 2013
By 
Dr. John Stanley (Ireland & UK) - See all my reviews
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Only Jung has ever dared to do such a thing for the God of the Old (and New) Testaments. Disturbing, amusing, brilliant and radical.
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Active Imagination & Jung, 3 July 2009
By 
M. G. de Paucar (Lancaster,UK) - See all my reviews
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Amazing book by Jung written late in life. Old Testament images connect very much to his experiences in Active Imagination earlier. Profund insight into the relationship between God and Man and the development of consciousness.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Have I gone mad?, 5 Oct 2013
By 
M. Lawton (TWells, UK) - See all my reviews
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What the hell is going on with the book cover? A cheese grater? Have I slipped into psychosis - a world where kitchen equipment is the highest form of symbolism? Jung grapples with the Answer to Job and the publishers think the question is 'Cheddar or Wensleydale, which is best'? What next, the Bible with an egg whisk on the front? Or maybe Moby Dick with a chip pan? Unbelievable.

However, in keeping with the culinary theme, this book sees Jung acting as slippery as a saucepan of eels. The Book of Job is, by turns, an actual event, a myth, a literary work that serves as a metaphor for a change in human consciousness that took place in antiquity or possibly all three. God is an external force that acts upon us, an omnipresent force that acts through us, or simply an archaic term used to describe functions of the Self. Or possibly all of these ... or none of them. His reasoning is all over the place. He's obviously steamed up about the text and its implications but if it's just a story what is there to get so het up about?

It's entertaining enough but I felt that his exploration into the nature of the Divine could've been better served if it hadn't been based on such a narrow basis as a single Biblical story. This, though, would miss the point for ultimately it seems that Jung, who was the son of a pastor, is arguing with himself about his own beliefs. His righteous indignation about the vindictive God depicted in the Book of Job is presumably a ploy designed to purge himself of the religious and cultural baggage he carried.

His book raises some important points but be warned that it will test your patience if you have a low tolerance to doctrine and theological debates or indeed, if you believe the Bible to be revealed Truth.
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