Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulously brilliant, 30 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Wither (Kindle Edition)
Through the grimacing tales and fantastic literacy skills, David Anderson displays unique themes that excellently portray his morally questionable characters. Although the stories can be rather unsettling I would defiantly recommend reading it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dark but delicious short stories!, 16 April 2014
By 
T. Dar (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Wither (Kindle Edition)
I bought this after having read 'The Wanderer' by David Anderson. I thought the author of such a superb book would produce some decent short stories in this collection - and I wasn't wrong!

Anderson doesn't fail to impress. His mastery of darkness, despair and deviancy is at once terrifyingly impressive and ever so slightly worrying. Still. it makes for some truly incredible stories.

I recommend this to anyone who is a fan of stories focussing on the darker aspects of human nature. A word of warning though, 'The Girl at the top of the stairs' is quite possibly the scariest thing I've ever read!!!

Not for the faint of heart - but a very impressive read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Dark but Enjoyable Read, 13 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Wither (Kindle Edition)
Wither is a collection of dark and disturbing tales from David Anderson, author of the equally impressive The Wanderer. The tales within are not for the fainthearted, but if you can get past the more unpleasant aspects of the stories you will find some accomplished writing.

We start with The Cry, a tale about a brutish headteacher who is tormented by an inexplicable scream after a falling out with his new neighbour. Goddard isn't the most friendly of men and I must admit to enjoying his eventual descent into madness.

The second tale, The Girl at the Top of the Stairs, follows a young family and how they deal with their son's insistence that there is an ominous figure lurking on the landing of their house. Of course they are dismissive at first, but as things become more weird, culminating in their son's disappearance, they are forced to give more credence to his claims.

The Window is a story about an impending calamity which will end the world as we know it. Bailie and her boyfriend Jamie just want to spend their last few days together in peace but outside factors won't allow them to do so. The name of the story comes from the fact that civilisation's descent into lawlessness is documented using the view from the couple's window.

Harsh Lessons deals with a mentally unstable teacher who takes his students' discipline measures into his own hands. Sick of being tormented by the kids he teaches, he resolves to get his own back on them in drastic fashion. I think this was my personal favourite of all the stories in this collection despite some rather shocking scenes (i.e. the one with McDermott in the car park!).

Wither is probably the most shocking of the stories within this collection. A heavy metal singer finds himself under the spell of a terrible hex that forces upon him an insatiable appetite for sex. Finding he can't attract women like he used to, he is forced to scrape the very bottom of the barrel in order to get what he needs. There are some pretty horrific scenes in this tale, and it is definitely not one for the easily offended - it even comes with a disclaimer on the title page!

The Cellar, whilst not bad, was my least favourite in this collection. It follows a young girl who has been held captive for many arduous years by an abusive captor. When he suddenly dies she is forced to leave her long time prison, but she does so with mixed feeling. This story acts as a kind of prequel to Anderson's novel, The Wanderer, so if you haven't read that you might not fully understand the ending of this short story. If, however, you have read The Wanderer and want to catch up with one of the main characters again then this one might be worth checking out.

Since I downloaded this collection, Anderson seems to have added another short story to the collection called Beattie Drove Home. I have not read this strangely titled effort as of this review, but I will attempt to download the updated file as soon as possible.

Most of the stories in Wither can be read in one sitting (I think Harsh Lessons and Wither are the longest) and they flew by for me. There are some uncomfortable moments and some scenes can be quite shocking but I often found myself compelled to read on. A cliche, but this book is quite the page turner and I'd definitely recommend it to horror fans. If, however, you enjoy happy endings, I would suggest you avoid this work as, usually, things don't end well for the story's protagonists (quite often they deserve what is coming to them, mind you!). I have read both of David Anderson's books now and I must say I have enjoyed them both. If you are a fan of dark and twisted short stories then you could do worse than download Wither - just be prepared to grimace and squirm on occasion!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Wither
Wither by David Anderson
£0.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews