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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yep, read this one too.
Nothing has surpassed the mistborn for me yet but his worldbuilding is so convincing and his storytelling is excellent. Good length, good characterisation, satisfying conclusion.
Published 5 months ago by J. Aitken

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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NO SWEARING IS BETTER THAN FAKE SWEARING
I needed to put on my thinking slippers before I reviewed this book. My thinking slippers (fluffy, pink, with a dusky-rose bow and memory foam sole) allow me clearer reasoning of complex feelings and issues. I often don them when deciding pizza versus curry, long skirt versus short, and whether or not I like a book.

I read Steelheart because someone said it was...
Published 8 months ago by S J Hollis


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yep, read this one too., 4 Feb 2014
By 
J. Aitken (uk) - See all my reviews
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Nothing has surpassed the mistborn for me yet but his worldbuilding is so convincing and his storytelling is excellent. Good length, good characterisation, satisfying conclusion.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Power currupts, epic power currupts epically, 1 Nov 2013
By 
K. G. A. Alavi (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This is the first of Brendon Sanderson's books I have read. I really enjoyed it. From what I read on the synopsis of this and his other books his style tends to be post-apocalyptic world. This one looks like a Superman gone bad theme. This interested me to read this from a fantasy writer's point of view rather than a comic writes point of view. The way Steelheart is described to look exactly like Superman does in the comics and cartoons, except with a black cloke instead of the Red one.

An event called the "Calamity" happened, casing normal people to gain super powers. These people are called Epics. As with the old adage of power corrupting. The Epics quickly establish themselves above normal people. The more powerful the Epic's ability the higher they are in the pecking order. Steelheart is arguably the most powerful epic of his time. He does not exactly have Superman's powers, but is very close. Superhuman strength, invulnerability, flight seemingly through gravity manipulation, turn non-living matter into steel and energy projections (blasts) from his hands. He is not really Superman gone bad; it is more if superman was never good.

The story starts with 8 year old David with his father in a bank trying to get a mortgage. With the appearance of the Epics, and property damage from their battles for supremacy the banks are even more dubious about lending money than they are today. Then an Epic enters to rob the bank and prove his dominance over the people of the city. Unfortunately for him the city already has an Epic who has claimed it. Steelheart. Quickly schooling the "little Epic" about his place in the pecking order of thing Steelheart is attacked by the military questioning his rule. The Epic see this opportunity to attack Steelheart. David's father shoots the Epic but in the process injures the seemingly invulnerable Steelheart. Enraged and wanting no wittiness to this event Steelheart kills David's father, everyone in the bank, destroys the bank itself and even the rescue workers. Only David escapes.

10 years later Epics have established themselves as the rulers. Governments have been destroyed, there is no police or military that is not under Epic control. The only resistance left are a group called the reckoners. Burning from his vengeance David has spent the last 10 years studying the Epics, their history their powers and their weakness. David is this worlds Batman, driven, intelligent, methodical and tactically gifted. For 10 years he has been planning analysing and cataloguing data in ultimately killing Steelheart. Knowing he will need resources to put his plan into motion he need to join the Reckoners, predicting their next hit. He now has to convince them to first take him in then also convince them to take on his quest to take down the most powerful Epic there is.

A great book, good story, great character development/revelations and extremely fast paced. Despite the pace I really enjoyed the way David analyse situations and "improvise" when he has to. The book is written from David's point of view, and you get revelations the same time he does. Really enjoyed this book looking forward to the next part.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Proper Fiction for Young Adults, 4 Oct 2013
In YA fiction I want strong characters, believable settings and a sensible plot. I don't want watered-down "hero's journey" stories full of stereotypical, childish characters and no real peril.

And I loved Steelheart.

I loved meeting characters who surprised me, visiting a city turned to steel where the sun never rises and riding a storycoaster with twist on top of twist. This is gutsy fiction where bad guys can be clever and good guys can die - and some characters are not what they seem. Superpowers do not automatically make heroes - or villains! And having finished, I'm tempted to reread in the same way everyone has to rewatch The Sixth Sense.

David is a young man with a serious grudge and a near-complete focus on killing Steelheart. He wants revenge and doesn't care what it costs him to get it. Until he meets the Prof, Megan and the other Reckoners. And on the way, he learns more about the world and himself than he ever expected.

When your only wish is to die for something, how can you bear to live?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 July 2014
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5.0 out of 5 stars 5 Stars, 13 July 2014
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Amazing story, love the idea of the epics and the young lad who devotes himself to bringing down steelheart. Really enjoyed the story and can't wait for the next instalment.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Really love the storm light archive books and Elantris, 3 July 2014
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M. J. Odell (UK) - See all my reviews
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Really love the storm light archive books and Elantris, so found Steel heart very different. But it is so well written and the story kept me hooked up to the end. So respect to BrandonSanderson for being such a diverse writer, a true storyteller which is rare. I particularly like the way that though you want him to continue with the story he forces you to stop and think take time to pick up the clues. Also his characterization in this is excellent I could actually picture Megan. Read it if you want to know about superheroes or if you are like me addicted to Brandon Sanderson
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting begining, 17 Jun 2014
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Brandon Sanderson doesn't let you down and his books are always engrossing reads. This isn't an exception and I only gave it four stars because I'm comparing it to some of his other books e.g. the Mistborn and way of kings trilogies which are some of the best books I've read. In my opinion Steelheart isn't quite as good as these as it lacks some of the depth and intrigue that some of his other books have however its still a classic action packed book which you won't want to put down!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Solid story, good fun to read., 8 Jun 2014
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There were some characters I kinda felt weren't fleshed out enough but it was well written and a well paced story with a satisfying end.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Super-Hero / Anti-Hero clashes, 8 Jun 2014
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Another example of how Sanderson can turn his hand to almost anything and make it amazing. I loved this story and I read it in one sitting. The character David is a loveable yet nerdy guy who has worked his whole life to attempt to find a way to defeat the Epic, Steelheart, who controls the city and who killed his father. He is a well-written character with a terrible lack of metaphor ability which makes him charming in some ways and ridiculously silly in a good way too.

The plot is exciting and eventful and the character's abilities and potential is endless so it's an enchanting read. The plot is fast-moving and there are a few twists which really make me want to read the next one as soon as I can!

Highly recommended and a wonderful read! My first superhero-like read, and certainly not a let-down!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Entertainment, 6 Jun 2014
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This book was my introduction to Brandon Sanderson, and I would strongly recommend it. The book is well-paced, well-planned with sufficient twists to the narrative to keep you uncertain as to precisely what's been happening until the final few pages. The writing style is crisp and evocative: I found it easy to imagine the steel-city of Newcago, stratified into tiers and presided over by Steelheart, an invulnerable epic with whom our protagonist, David, has his grievance.

The premise to the book was surprisingly engrossing, so much so that I read it entirely in two sittings. Epics, humans with supernatural abilities, surface within civilisation after the event known as Calamity, about which there is much speculation but as of yet no explanation. The Epics choose to subjugate society, although there is great disparity concerning their powers, so that only the most eminent emerge as dictators. Steelheart, one of such, features early in the novel: causing the death of the David's father in his power play that sees him become the despot of Newcago. David devotes the rest of his life to having his revenge.

It would be easy for a different writer to become stranded and inconsistent with the vast array of possibilities that come with a new flock of supernatural abilities, but Sanderson is quick to tabulate the lore, including colourful terminology that really makes the reader believe in the setting. There's a whole new economy set around the Epics, with plenty of hints for potential plot lines in future instalments. In addition, the narrative is deeper and more gratifying than a standard revenge set-up, with plenty of debate from the main characters, the Reckoners: a guerrilla group dedicated to the assassination of Epics, about the merits of Steelheart's rule, and how harmful the consequences would be to Newcago should he be removed.

Sadly, the manuscript has its caveats. The main character is confined to the peripherals of being believable. He repeatedly states that his entire life is devoted to death of Steelheart, yet these iterations are interspersed with banter about his poor command of metaphors, back-and-forth with the comedian of the team, and frequent endeavours, along with much worrying, to impress the girl. He is also socially apt, despite abjuring friendship in the orphanage in which he grew up, and not at all shy about opening up. This is all evident before his character is given chance to develop. Were it not for his saying so, there is little indication that this character is damaged; therefore, his vendetta feels like a contrivance to place him where he needs to be in order to advance the plot.

There is some discussion about the idea that 'power corrupts,' although it seems restricted to superficial forays. Nevertheless, it forms a firm foundation on which the entertainment value is delivered, and my only complaint is that the philosophical revelation David experiences at the novel's climax feels incongruous, as though it's trying to be more than the novel set out to be. Ultimately, however, despite the imperfections, Steelheart is sufficiently engrossing and well-thought-out, so as to leave you anxiously awaiting the sequel.
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