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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
These two discs feature live-in-the-studio recordings made by The Beatles for BBC Radio between 1962 and 1965.
Over half of these 56 songs are covers, many of which were never officially released, and it's a real treat to have this often-bootlegged material available and sounding very, very good. And the lavish 46-page booklet features complete recording information,...
Published on 26 Jun. 2005 by Docendo Discimus

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49 of 55 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where you once belonged
How strange that no one's reviewed this yet! This is the Beatles as a pretty good pub band.
After the White Album in late 68, Paul McCartney had the idea of recording an album with no overdubbing, no fancy studio tricks, just the Beatles playing live - something old, something new etc. It didn't work in January 1969 when they tried it, but it did work throughout...
Published on 15 Dec. 2001 by P. Bryant


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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, 26 Jun. 2005
By 
Docendo Discimus (Vita scholae) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
These two discs feature live-in-the-studio recordings made by The Beatles for BBC Radio between 1962 and 1965.
Over half of these 56 songs are covers, many of which were never officially released, and it's a real treat to have this often-bootlegged material available and sounding very, very good. And the lavish 46-page booklet features complete recording information, pictures, and essays by Derek Taylor and producer Kevin Howlett.
The Beatles do their best to live up to their happy-go-lucky images on a number of non-musical "soundbytes", and Paul McCartney gets to sing a couple of too-cute pop songs, but the majority of this material is simply magnificent. John Lennon sings a tough rock n' roll-rendition of Ray Charles' "I Got A Woman", McCartney rips loose on electrifying versions of "Lucilel" and "I Saw Her Standing There", and George Harrison does a credible Chuck Berry on "Roll Over Beethoven".
A couple of Arthur Alexander-covers are equally great, and Lennon performs a wonderfully tough, confident reading of "A Shot Of Rhythm & Blues" and tears through a great, punchy "Dizzy Miss Lizzy".
Their own songs sound magnificent as well. A driving "A Hard Day's Night", the clanging, circular guitar riff of "Ticket To Ride" ringing out...Well, you can check out the track list for youself.
This is a delightful 2hrs+ of music. The Beatles give it their all, and you can hear what a terrific little rock n' roll combo they were when they could actually hear each other play!
Very highly recommended.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not perfect collection, 25 Feb. 2005
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
For years bootlegs (LPs back then, the "Live at the Beeb" series) of the BBC-radioshows were in high demand: they covered every show the Fab Four ever performed for the BBC. They would never fit on a 2CD-set. So yes, one will miss a song or two on this collection, but there are some real gems (I'll be on my way, Clarabella, Lucille - to name but three). I think they could have put on more covers that were not released on their official albums, as some performances are clearly inferior.
The BBC itself did not archive these recordings, as far as I know, though there may be acetates. Luckily most of it was recorded by fans and survived that way. Naturally the audio quality of these recordings is far from perfect (compared to their first album, which in itself was almost 'live in the studio'), but most are listenable enough. Some are really bad (Keep your hands off my baby, for one, and a couple of TV performances), but I guess these are included for their uniqueness. I could have done without the chats, especially when they are edited over the music and you can't skip the track.
All in all it's a great set that shows the Beatles'influences and for me, I think some of their covers are so much better than the originals!
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars (Extended) Beatles Broadcasting Corporation 1, 11 Nov. 2013
By 
Quiverbow (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
First released in 1994, `Live at the BBC' has been both remastered and re-packaged, which gets rid of the unwieldy plastic double CD boxes that always managed to get cracked or lost the lugs for the discs. That re-packaging, which is far superior, has bought it in line with most other Beatles CDs (and I'm sure the remaining ones, `Anthology', and `Let It Be...Naked', will follow). The cover photo, which was digitally altered quite a lot (see original photo), is no longer the silly sepia toned one, but contemporary black and white. (The cut-and-paste rear photo of the booklet has been cleaned up to remove Ringo's 'ghost head'.) The remastering has made it all better, not sounding as 'tinny', though there is a limit to what you can do with 50 year old recordings made from a transistor radio. But it isn't an exact re-release as this remaster has 71 tracks as opposed to the 69 on the original and a bit of speech replaced with another. Despite asking the relevant people why (that's Apple, EMI and the BBC), no reply has been forthcoming. And the booklet, too, is slightly different in terms of photo layout and content.

By far the best of the post 1970 releases, this is a showcase for songs the group would never record and gives an idea as to what most of us missed. Of the 56 musical tracks, 28 were covers never issued by the group on their official 1960s releases, one is an oddity in `From Us To You', one has a different Beatle singing, and another (a Lennon-McCartney original) was only ever performed on this one occasion. Moreover, it's those 28 songs (and the other three mentioned) which make this collection worthwhile. That isn't to say the remainder aren't good, they are, but we all know those songs backwards even though they're audibly different here with, in many instances, George enjoying himself with his solos.

Whilst many of those 28 songs were performed just once, it's hard to place them in any order of preference, but the standout tracks, in my opinion, have to be the early protest song of `Soldier of Love', `Ooh! My Soul' (followed by an amusing snippet of speech), `I Just Don't Understand', `Lucille' with its stinging guitar solo, `Some Other Guy' (in front of an audience showing just how exciting they were live), and `Clarabella' simply for its obscurity value. For George fans, your boy gets to sing a half dozen of these covers and a further three elsewhere.

Highlights of the rest. `I'll Be On My Way' is the most unusual selection included, seeing as it's an original song; `Honey Don't' is sung by John, `A Hard Day's Night' has an extended ending to prove they "weren't playing the record" (not quite true as, weirdly, the piano break is brutally edited in from the record). A powerful live version of `Thank You Girl' is, I think, better than the studio recording, and whilst the quality of `Keep Your Hands off My Baby' isn't the best, Apple couldn't leave it out (it's also the earliest song here), and `Baby It's You' has a cute full ending. The two 'extra' tracks added to this remaster is a repeat of 'From Us To You' tagged on at the end complete with BBC announcer, and George reading out a letter asking why he hasn't been to the Isle of Wight - "I haven't got a passport".

The between song banter is interesting enough, and the early exchanges gives the impression of four lads having a good time, which is what endeared them to the public. Whilst girls fantasised about them and boys wanted to copy them, the mums and dads were swayed by the kind of chat heard here. They didn't take themselves too seriously and their northern vernacular was in marked contrast to the well intoned BBC voices usually heard; they sung a few songs those parents would know and came over as people who had a bit of a homey touch that appealed to many, not just the teenage element. My only gripe is why this isn't in chronological order.

If you already have this in the double jewel case, is it worth replacing? It has been remastered and the case is much better, and you do get those two 'extras', so if it was my decision, then yes (I did). If you don't have this, then get it. With technology as it is now and music on both radio and television 24 hours a day, those three guitars and drums still haven't been beaten. The ability to sing and play, it's called talent, seems to have been lost.

The Beatles also recorded a further 31 songs for the BBC so there's enough for a second volume one day.

Well, how coincidental is that? No sooner have I finished this review than a `Volume 2' appears.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beatles BBC: "B - - - - y Brilliant Compilation", 1 Dec. 2006
By 
Geoffrey Millar (Brunswick Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
When this collection was released, prior to the Anthology series, it was the first `new' Beatles material released for many years.

Many of the songs have been previously bootlegged, but this collection has many unfamiliar tunes, including some Chuck Berry numbers and contemporary beat tunes like `Some Other Guy' and `Hippy Hippy Shake'.

The banter with BBC presenters is delightful, as is reading the fan mail and various comments and in-jokes.

The set is just short of a revelation. It's full of energy, toughness, fun and sparkle. There are some great covers, as well as slightly different versions of the usual Beatles hits. It's interesting that they seem to have put just as much thought into the covers as their own material: these songs were never 'filler', but songs The Beatles knew and loved.

The packaging and liner notes are marvellous and each disc has about 30 tracks, so the set is great value.

The only drawback of this terrific album is the sound: glorious mono, with varying degrees of low, medium and hi `fi' due to the age of the tapes and BBC recording techniques. It's not even at the standard of the official Beatles mono LPs, but it's always listenable and you soon forget about the sound, anyway.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's THE BEATLES!!!, 17 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
What a lovely surprise to rediscover this collection in its new incarnation, with a bunch of newly added gems here and there, which make it quite different from the 1994 original edition.
The new remastering has undoubtedly bettered the sound, the tracklisting's been slightly altered by adding new dialogue snippets and removing some fade ins/fade outs from the tracks.
And the packaging has been restyled too, now , similarly to what Apple have done with "1" and the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"
Apart from the infamous Ringo ghost head, finally removed from the booklet back cover photo, please note that some liner notes have been more carefully re-written, with correct recording and transmission dates.
Highly recommended in this new edition, as well and, in times like ours, in a age of web streaming, mp3 and headphones, to be listened to the old way, from start to finish, like we all used to from our vintage radio in the past!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top rate material from the Fab Four, July 20, 2001, 11 Sept. 2012
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
The Beatles' only official live document, excluding the 1977 release of LIVE AT THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL (out of print, thankfully) which was never more of an interesting side note as the screaming fans almost made the band inaudible and the tape quality was simply not that exciting, stands as the long lost link in The Beatle's impeccable legacy as muscicans.

Twenty nine of these cuts have been previously unreleased, and while, sadly, there are still a few more cuts from these sessions left in the vaults, this by far and large presents the lion's share of the BBC sessions. What makes this package really first rate are the previously unavailable cuts which would have made a really good double album back in vinyl days. Had they released a double album of just good old fashion rock and roll covers it would stand proud against the rest of their legacy, and beating Dylan to the punch of having the first double album ever. Why a lot of these cuts never made it has always been beyond me. The songs here really shows The Beatles' roots and influences and how they assimilated them into their own sound in the very heights of Beatlemania, that time era of 1963-1965 where no one could get enough of them. While I've never been a fan of The Beatles doing Chuck Berry, they do a cut of his toward the last of Disc 2 (I think it is "Don't Go"), which is really good. Almost all of the cuts were good enough to be included on those first five albums, although the takes themselves may not have been. The sound is generally pristine though because of some of the tape quality it suffers a little on a few cuts but never sinks below listenable, as AMG points out. The rest of the cuts are from their official canon, with such early staples as "Hard Day's Night," "I Saw Her Standing There," "Can't Buy Me Love," and "Things We Said To Day" highlighting the show.

Another very interesting thing is it shows this band playing live, and you can just feel the rush and giddy excitement these boys had, and gives you an insight into why The Beatles have become such a major part of our culture. Very highly recommended as a look at the creative processes of The Beatles and just good solid rock and roll back in the early days before they would move onto lush psychedelic music of the last half of their career. This album has been a staple of my Beatles collection ever since I bought it back in 1998 or '99, and I haven't understood why Amazon did not include this until just recently.

Bottom line: Top rate stuff. Buy it today! This has been out since 1994 and you haven't got it already?????

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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Portrait of the Artists as Young Men, 1 April 2006
By 
craig black (edinburgh, scotland United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
When this album was first released in the mid-90's I'll admit I bought it largely as merely a companion to the original fabs lps of this period('62-'65 approx.),a collection-filler which I doubted I would find the desire to actually listen to very much-but I was wrong! Despite a few complaints(don't worry we will come to those in a moment)this album is, in its own way, just as good as the official Beatles releases from this period(Please Please Me thru to Help!)and should not be ignored.
Many of these tracks were live favorites during their early days playing the Star-Club, the Cavern and so on, but, by the height of Beatlemania, when all their scream-tastic audiences required of them was to turn up, look pretty and run through half-arsed, barely audible versions of the hits, these live-in-the-studio BBC sessions gave them their only chance to perform them, and the group's enthusiasm at being given this opportunity to be able to please themselves and be musicians again for a change, rather than simply "pop stars", is both obvious and highly infectious.
This is the Beatles at the height of their fame, "in the eye of the hurricane" as John Lennon later called it, relaxing and playing the music they'd loved as teenagers, without worrying about record sales or commercial appeal. Hearing tracks such as I Got A Woman, Lucille or the blueswailing I Got to Find My Baby(as good as anything similar The Stones were recording at the time), or to listen to them in the speech tracks, gently taking the piss out of "your pal" DJ Brain Matthews, is to hear the group when they really were just "four lads from Liverpool",before the appeal of fame wore off and the Studio became the only place they could really be themselves, free from the bullsht "celebrity" attracts.
I like to view Live at the BBC as almost a mirror image of 1968's White Album. Just as that record saw the group's three main songwriters working often individually on tracks that clearly displayed their influences at the time(Lennon-Yoko Ono and the avant garde, McCartney-Pet Sounds and The Who, Harrison-Indian music and Bob Dylan),the BBC album shows them doing the same thing 5 years before-each in turn taking a chance to front the band and attempt to emualate the heroes and inspirations of the day(Lennon-Arthur Alexander and Chess R'n'B, McCartney-Little Richard and Broadway musicals, Harrison-Carl Perkins and Sun rockabilly,prior to the point where they equalled then eventually outgrew these early influences and went on to the next chapter of their career.
As such this album is a fascinating insight into the Beatles at their rawest and most naive(musically speaking, that is).Its not a perfect collection-even to a Pavement fan like myself the sound quality on a few tracks, such as Keep Your Hands Off My Baby and Thats Alright, sounds not so much lo-fi as no-fi. The record is also too long-the alternate versions of Lennon-McCartney songs already available elsewhere are inferior to the originals and are unnecessary.
Despite these (very minor) grumbles however this remains a great album and essential listening to any of fan of the Beatles music of this period(if you're a newcomer try A Hard Day's Night or Past Master One first)and is highly recommened.
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49 of 55 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where you once belonged, 15 Dec. 2001
By 
P. Bryant (Nottingham, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
How strange that no one's reviewed this yet! This is the Beatles as a pretty good pub band.
After the White Album in late 68, Paul McCartney had the idea of recording an album with no overdubbing, no fancy studio tricks, just the Beatles playing live - something old, something new etc. It didn't work in January 1969 when they tried it, but it did work throughout 1963 and 1964, when they recorded this whole pile of stuff for the BBC, dashing down to London in the van after doing a one night stand in Bolton or Ilfracombe or some such place, a couple of hours kip, then - er - what are we going to do for Saturday Club, lads? What about Nothing Shakin but the Leaves on the Trees? Okay, Paul, why don't you do Clarabella? Okay - here we go, one two three, wham bang - Thanks Brian, and thanks to all at number 44 Mount Street, Clacton for the kind birthday wishes, and the bag of jellybabies. Here Mr Matthew, have a jellybaby. Oops, look at the time - gotta dash, playing in Glasgow tonight!
In 1963 the Beatles were constantly racing around Britain, and in 1964 racing around the world. They made famous hit records. But when they recorded their many appearances on teenage radio shows they mostly played their favourite old country and rhythm & blues numbers, things which they'd done at the Star Club or the Cavern, very straighforward, no frills (no time for frills anyway!). It's delightful, but I must be honest. I could live without about half of this double-cd. The other half has wonderful obscurities like "A Shot of Rhythm and Blues", or "Soldier of Love", or Paul whispering "Clarabella" (another Little Richard impersonation) or Paul warbling "The Honeymoon Song" (which he later made Mary Hopkin sing). All their early influences are here displayed (the usual suspects, Carl Perkins, Chuck Berry, Ray Charles), and after all, it is the Fabs. And if I was booking groups in 1963, I'd definately have had them back again. Very professional. very workmanlike. Hard to believe that psychedelia was just round the corner.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great re master of volume one Beatles live at the BBC, 13 Nov. 2013
By 
Marcia "marcia" (england) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
Is it worth re buying this album Live at the BBC originally issued in 1994? Well yes, yes definatly. This new issue is better on many levels and its easy to say that it is worth getting again.
The sound is better for a start. There is noticeably more body to the sound and it is not as tinny as the 94 issue. There is clear noise reduction and it all sounds brighter and sharper. The 94 issue is very good and if you are a casual fan of the Beatles it is still going to serve well. But anyone that is a serious fan really should consider re buying the album on the re master sound alone providing of course you liked the music content and historical aspect of this album.
Secondly this new release comes into line with the more recent official re mastered albums in terms of presentation. We now have the familiar card gatefold album cover with no plastic case or trays. I much prefer the art work with the front picture changing from the 94 sepia image that made it look as if it was historically from the Victorian period rather than the 1960s to a more accurate black and white image. In keeping with this there is good photo art work on the inside gatefold with black and white picture of the bbc broadcasting house. Then the booklet is great with nice presentation with good colour and black and white photos and track details. It is a really nice presentation.

The concept of the album was always great anyway, even back in 94. First of all the Beatles were so successful in the 1960s and they appeared in magazine interviews, TV appearances and Radio which all helped to raise their profile. Just the same as any other famous pop act that came after them or today. But there is not much that is available of the Beatles so this release helps us to be connected to the Beatles as people, the sixties and the atmosphere of the era with the group as a currently popular and modern pop group. It is a time capsule. We get bits of conversation and banter between DJs and the fab four which adds that human personality to the people behind the music. Its interesting to hear the opinions of the group at the time and there is good fun humour in the banter.

Of course that is where the other interest is. The music. The Beatles recorded so much during the sixties and they often performed some songs many times. And that was true on Radio as well. But thankfully the Beatles performed other songs on these Radio recordings that are mostly covers of already established songs. This gives this album is value and its potential. There are at least 28 songs that are recorded here that do not appear on the official album releases.
The other tracks offer us an alternative version with great live performance. And to add to that there is the fact that despite the reality that the BBC made these recordings for radio transmission on equipment that wasn't as good as studio quality it is actually better sound quality than the majority of alternative archive recordings of the Beatles. Bootleg material and other live recordings were usually poor. Lets face it the sound on these recordings is actually very good indeed and not that far off the studio album quality. And the live versions don't have thousands of screaming fans on them spoiling the music or over powering the recording levels.

This is a really great release and it is easily a good addition to the official album releases.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A really great live band, very entertaining listening, 18 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Live At The BBC (Audio CD)
I bought this album when it first came out in the 90's - the recordings being over 30 years old at that time - and I still really enjoy listening to it today.
These live recordings from the first half of the 60s show what an incredibly good live band they were. The choice of songs, their own and covers, is also very good.

The short speaking parts between some of the tracks are also very interesting and entertaining.

I highly recommend this to Beatles fans, and fans of good music in general.
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