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199 of 216 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "...It's My Heart That You Stole..." - Exile On Main St. by THE ROLLING STONES (2010 2CD Remaster)
Following an album like 1971's magnificent "Sticky Fingers" was always going to be a tall order, but The Stones did it with swagger and panache. "Exile On Main St" was released 12 May 1972 as a 2LP set on Rolling Stones Records COC 69100 in the UK and on COC 2-2900 in the USA. It reached the coveted number 1 spot on both sides of the pond - and like The Beatles "White...
Published on 16 May 2010 by Mark Barry

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56 of 60 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This version is a rip-off
although the music is great, this version is absurd. The remaster is compressed therefore the dynamics in the sound are gone. If you want it on cd, get the one issued by Virgin. 7 of the 10 bonus tracks have recently been overdubbed, thus making them sound like the present day Stones.

I bought the vinyl version of this album and the vinyl sounds great. The real...
Published on 23 May 2010 by F. Bunnik


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Only my opinion...., 20 Jun 2010
By 
Bernard J. Ryan "BJR" (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
No one likes the Stones more than I do, and I love some of the tracks on this album, - Shine a Light, etc, - but for some reason I have never thought of this album as their VERY best. I even think Goats Head Soup to be very underrated.
I actually think Sticky Fingers to have better songs on it, and think of it as the finer album.
Just my own personal opinion, that's all. But am I the only person in the world to actually think this?
I often think so. So be it, we must be able to have our own opinion, not just follow popular opinion.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Buy older versions, 16 Jun 2010
I have to agree with F. Bunnik. Although I haven't listened to the Exile Remaster, or should that be 'remix'!!!!, I have however listened to the other re-issues from sticky fingers onwards. So I'm not even gonna waste my time with it.

I bought the remasters box set and was very disappointed. I was shocked they let this out. I have the original CD's and some of the original vinyl's. In comparison, vinyl is best, followed by the original CD's then the remasters. The original CD's are a closer match to the records. The new versions are too hard to listen to, even at low levels. As F. Bunnik has mentioned, it's over compressed probably due to the levels being ramped up. This is done for a loudness 'wow' effect. It results in a uncomfortable listen and loss of dynamics.

Shame really. Especially when you see/hear how it's supposed to be done with the Beatles remasters. Get on ebay or down to a record store and get the albums on vinyl or the older CD's.

Rocking band though...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome album, but..., 10 May 2011
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I've owned Exile for years. It is a fantastic piece of work and deserves its classic status. I recently gave in to buying the remastered 2 disc edition after holding off for a while.

The packing is a tad disappointing: the booklet doesn't have a holder, so it just falls out. There's no reproduction of the infamous Exile postcards which is a big oversight. Also, the credits on the songs are bit revisionist, crediting certain musicians on songs that they didn't play on.

The sound is very good, although it's not that much different than the previous remaster from 1994.

The 10 track bonus disc is good stuff. "Plundered My Soul" is especially excellent, Jagger's additional vocals are splendid and it's heartening to hear Mick Taylor working on a Stones project again.

It seems that the Stones recent remaster series has been a bit of a missed opportunity, what with so many great songs, such as "Criss-Cross Man" and "Fast Talking, Slow Walking..." from the Goats Head Soup sessions, remaining in the vaults. Perhaps they wouldn't want to have to pay the likes of Mick Taylor any further royalties?

So, overall: a 5 star album, 3 star packaging. However, it must be said: if you don't own this album, buy it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Give preference to the Virgin releases, 19 Feb 2011
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The thing I want to stress in this review is that I advise everybody to buy the Virgin releases as long a they are available. These are the best masters the Stones albums of the seventies and later have ever had. I checked a few of these with cool-edit and these masters are using the complete dynamic range of the CD format without hitting saturation to often.

The older masters on CBS were clearly less good (although not suffering satuaration and clipping), while the new Universals are victim to the loudness war (check Wiki if you don't know what this is). I own the SE of Exile on Universal, and kept the Virgin next to it. The Universal SE is only in my collection for the bonus disc.

Star rating is for the album, minus one star due to the mastering.

(I posted similar reviews for more of the Virgin releases since I all own them, and for Universals "Exile"; I don't post it on the other Universals since I don't own them).
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Steel Kettle Drums on Stones album shock!, 22 May 2010
By 
Smitty Werbenjaegermanjensen (real name) (Thread rehab facility 37) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
OK then, most of the other reviews have given you, the dear reader, their version of the lowdown on this remastered, much vaunted sprawling epic from the Stones. You now know the "history" of the exile, the nature of Keiths temporary accomodation, the squalid undertones and the sort of hangers on they attracted like flies to roadkill.

Why write another review when everything that really needs to be said has already been discussed elsewhere? Basically it is to outline the sonic improvements that have made themselves apparent over a couple of days listening.

Once again the remastering done by the Marcusson team has managed to eek out extra subtle details that help bring the performance to life. It is like wiping a pane of glass that you thought was clean only to find that it is now really clean. The brass sounds, well, brassier. The acoustic guitar sounds zingier and more like a real acoustic guitar and so on. My ears say its OK if there is compression issues that can be seen on a computer screen if sounds this good.

The biggest surprise to these ears was the steel kettle drums mirroring the guitar buried hard to left that starts 57 seconds before the end of the majestic Loving Cup. I have had this album in various formats for three decades and it is an absolute delight to still find new sounds and textures therein.

The music and sound quality of this version is so good that I am willing to overlook the(once again!!! Tut, tut, tut, Universal. Sack your art crowd as they are a very weak link) less than deluxe quality of this deluxe edition. Tiny writing in a bland and unengaging fashion, unlike the hand scrawled originals. The Virgin Collectors version did it much better. This level of packaging design would give me grave concerns if I was going to fork out the ton for the mega issue.

The bonus tracks sit well as a separate cd and generally have a feel similar to the original album. Thanks for not tacking them onto the same disc as the main album! I had heard Mick and Keef had gone in and tweaked vocals and guitar lines on a couple of them. I was concerned that this would be a grating excercise and a pointless tampering with songs that surfaced on boot over the years. However this has been done so well that it is not sticking out like a sore thumb. Following the River is the exception IMHO, it is a bit overwrought and does nothing for me whatsoever. Look for Lisa Fischer and Cindy Mizelle in the song credits and you are there. It is, again, a pleasure to be served up some early 70's sounding Stones stuff. These bonus tracks are worth the extra couple of quid, easily.

In summary, it sounds better than ever before and is an essential purchase for anyone who likes the Stones and does not already own it. It is very highly recommended to anyone who already has it in any previous version.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let it steal your heart away, 4 Jun 2006
By 
D. Lowbrow (Bohemian Riviera) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Exile On Main Street (Audio CD)
When the Gods kick back with a few cold ones up on Mt Olympus, there comes a moment in the proceedings when they respectfully remove Bach's Cello Suites from the turntable and slap on Side One of Exile. There falls a hush, the needle hits, a brief crackle distorts the speakers, and now a tight, dirty guitar riff is answered by a son-of-a-b*tch of a snare snap. The riff repeats twice before a bunch of other instruments tumbles haphazardly in, falling one over the another, soon joined by a weary, post-coital voice drawling lazily along with the instrumental rabble ("I hear you talking when I'm on the street..."). Two lines later, without warning, a second voice starts screaming the top part harmony, hoarse, barely in tune. It sounds rubbish. It sounds divine. A stomping, barrelhouse piano kicks in, the tempo builds, and now, now they're on their feet: the divine hips are swiveling, the immortal booties shaking, the sweet ambrosia flowing ("I can't seem to stay in step, `cause she COMES every TIME that she PIR-OU-ETTES over MEEEE ..."). The par-taaaay is ON.

If Exile on Main St is good enough for the Deathless Ones, it's good enough for you. It's an impressionistic, abstract tone-poem that - by way of a bizarre misunderstanding - made it to the top of the pop charts. It's a nitty, gritty sewer of sleaze and filth bathed in the sweet summer sun of the French Riviera. It's a devastating portrait of cynicism, exhaustion, and despair that'll make you want to sing for pure joy that you're alive.

It's that good. Just you try it on.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars In from Exile, 17 May 2010
By 
Neil Mawer (Lincoln, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
First let me say of the four classic Stones albums, Exile was always my least favourite. On vinyl, even with a high end hi fi system, the sound was so muddy as to detract from the musical content.

So to the first disc, the remaster. Where the 90s master was clearer than the 70s vinyl, it was lightweight. This latest mastering is clearer still, but with that added bass weight. Infact for the first time you can follow the basslines! A huge improvement, and for those who can hear more hiss on some tracks, of course you can - clarity exposes those imperfect analogue tapes as well! My own view is it would have been better still if remixed like Mick has mentioned doing in the past. (compare the detail and weight of the newly mixed alternate Loving Cup from disc 2 with the original)

And so to disc 2, and yes 3 of the songs;Pass the Wine, Plunder My Soul and Follow the River are as good as anything on the original album. The 2 alternate takes are on because they surpass the originals. (Likewise the alternate All Down the Line is not on as its inferior to the original) The other outtakes are worthy of release, even the instrumental jam Title 5 is far more interesting than the Ventilator Blues/I Just want to see his Face jam/medley , which was the only weak spot of the original album.

In my view still a less coherent album than either Let it Bleed or Sticky Fingers, but one of the 4 essential Stones albums to own, and this is by some margin the best version of Exile to listen to
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39 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If narcotics made noise, this is what they�d sound like, 16 July 2002
By 
This review is from: Exile On Main Street (Audio CD)
The roughness of punk, melody of pop, attitude of rap, poetry of folk, humour of ska, poignancy of country and integrity of blues...oh, and a bit of gospel too.
What other band, of the stature The Stones were in 1972, would be brave enough to produce a record with so many rough edges? When you first listen to Exile you'd think this was a local band who need a bit more time to rehearse. As with so many good things in life though, this record grows on you. I've owned this record for over 15 years and still hear new things every time I listen to it. We all have albums we thought were great for the first few listens, but very quickly become sickly sweet. It's the warts-n-all roughness of this that makes it great. Eventually you will begin to hear the controlled musicianship, and this, mixed with top quality songwriting, means they pull it off brilliantly.
Few albums have a character uniquely their own. Most are carriers for singles with a 4/5 extra tracks to flesh them out, and too little thought is given to the overall result (please don't mention "concept" albums). Even given that The Stones' previous four albums were classics, and nearly ten years of superb singles went before it, this is still their masterpiece. It's quite simply the most together piece of rock'n'roll you'll ever hear.
Compared to Exile, much of what we hear today sounds bland, characterless and pointless. Not to mention tacky. Mind you, against this album, most of the popular music in 1972 probably sounded like that too.
If you're new to The Stones, this isn't the best place to start. More immediately accessible are Beggars Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers. This though, is the album that will change the way you look at, and listen to, pop music.
PS. For those of you who like the bar-room country style of Exile, you must get "The Band" by The Band. It's their first LP, and followed a period as Bob Dylan's backing group.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stone wall classic, 24 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. M. L. Hawes "Mitchmusic" - See all my reviews
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For a change I'll keep this brief.

Most people buying Rolling Stones records will probably buy Hot Licks or some other compilation in the hope that this will cover all the bases needed to gain an appreciation of this legendary band. Understandable, but of course as any buyer of a greatest hits will find, these compilations do not have the relevance of a complete work, an album created for a single release.

I don't confess to be a rock historian, but Exile looked like a suitable place to begin a trek into the Stones back catalogue and how right I was. In essence it has a real deep blues feel to it, with Jagger on tremendous form really showing off the true extent of his vocals whilst the band, in masterful form, back him up with some amazing playing.

The band often cite this album as not having any singles on it, but in a sense, that's the beauty of any true great work, it does not lend itself to the culling of a Greatest Hits, it works as a whole, a timepiece for the year of its release and is full of tracks that will worm your way into your psyche.

So, if you have the urge to develop your understanding of the Stones a bit more than endlessly playing Satisfaction or Brown Sugar, then this is a brilliant place to start.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still a great Album, 19 Oct 2013
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I bought this album first in 1972 and was underwhelmed because it wasn't a rehash of Sticky Fingers which I loved. By 1979 I had started to realise what a great and bold piece of work Exile was in its own right. I didn't find it easily accessible as an 18 year old, but time and experience began to bring home to me its qualities, which I still appreciate.

This is a genuinely great album, although for some, including me it might take a while to appreciate it.
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Exile on Main St (Blu-Ray Audio)
Exile on Main St (Blu-Ray Audio) by The Rolling Stones (Blu-ray - 2013)
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