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on 7 November 2013
I am fascinated with conversion stories, and this is perhaps the most extraordinary one I have read. Pearce is a well known biographer. This is beautifully written, very revealing of the grace of God, and I recommend it.
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on 9 September 2015
Those of us of a certain age and of a certain political persuasion will have had some run-ins with the far-right. Marching against the National Front in the 1970s and 1980s was an important part of your political education. Those of us who took an even more detailed interest in the people and personalities of the struggle will remember the name Joe Pearce. He was the leader of the Young National Front and the editor of Bulldog. One of the enemy.

I was a subscriber to Searchlight magazine for many years and rather enjoyed seeing the far-right fragment as bitterly as the far-left was capable of doing. It was also good to read of whistle-blowers and further startling revelations from deep inside the beast. Former fascist street warriors like Matthew Collins and Ray Hill properly turned the tables on their former comrades. Other names faded from view. One was Joe Pearce, who later resurfaced a biographer of GK Chesterton and had undergone a journey to the Catholic faith.

At this point some have thought that journey isn't a particularly long one. Indeed, Gerry Gable in Searchlight doesn't believe Pearce is for real. There's a piece where he describes the christian thinkers that Pearce has written about as notorious anti-semites. Frankly, this is bollocks.

Personally, I enjoyed most of the book. I wasn't impressed with how he referred to those protesting against the Front as "Marxists". The leadership of the Anti-Nazi League may have been, but most people who hated what he stood for were just ordinary decent youth.

One of the best tales was when Jake Burns of Stiff Little Fingers took Pearce for a beer and tried to talk a bit of common sense to him. By showing him a bit of human love, he lit something in a life consumed by bitterness and spite (why can't we take over, and try to put it right).

I'm a Catholic, but I can't claim to understand theology or the liturgy in the way Pearce does. Instead I do rather respect how he's chosen a path of life that boils down to the simplicity of the message.
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on 17 June 2014
Race with the Devil came along at just the right time for me. I found it deeply helpful. Pearce's journey from venom spewing neo-Nazi, to repentant Roman Catholic, is deeply powerful, and truly inspiring. Pearce has quickly become one of my favorite authors.
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on 14 March 2014
This is an important book. It give an insight into the sheer destructiveness of racial and political hatred. More importantly, it shows that individuals caught up in this evil can truly change. It is an antidote to cynicism.
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on 26 December 2013
Good book for anyone who loves true stories. It was recommended by a friend who was loved it. A good read.
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on 27 June 2014
I think this is a remarkable story, which is well written and well told. It is a story which has the ability to speak to many different people, those who find themselves in a similar position, as well as those who might just be curious as to how one man could change so much.
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on 10 January 2016
Without question a very fascinating conversion story! I only wish it had more that would explain to non-Catholics or non-Christians WHY the literature of the Christian writers he encountered had such an impact on him - he does explain it in some detail, but I don't think it's clear enough for non-Christians what exactly the draw was - he could put some more meat on those sections and give some more examples of the enlightening writing he encountered. In that way the book would serve better as an entrance for non-Christians to begin to explore Christian thinking and perhaps itself be a tool of conversion. I have given the autobiography only four stars as I think it's best suited for those already familiar with Christian thought and literature, but could need some more explaining for "outsiders".
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on 15 May 2015
Excellent and brutally honest story of the journey of someone at the height of racialist politics through to finding salvation in religion. He's neither glossed over or dismissed his former self and that's really refreshing in a biog.
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on 1 August 2014
What a wonderful story. Shows what can happen to an individual.
No one should ever be written off. Joseph Pearce proves that. And unless you are perfect there is plenty to learn in the book. I certainly have learnt a major lesson.
Everyone should read this book. That is EVERYONE.
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on 7 January 2015
VERY WELL WRITTEN; a VERY GOOD FEAD
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