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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended - classic Brit horror!
Put simply this is a true British horror gem.
'The Mummy' formed part of a classic monster 'trilogy' along with 'The Curse of Frankenstein' (utterly recommended...GO BUY!) and 'Dracula' - all of which featured the archetypal pairing of Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. Here Christopher Lee plays Kharis - an Egyptian priest who, through his wrongdoings, becomes...
Published on 20 Jan 2005 by lukenors_

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars lacking that special ingredient.
the mummy films have never been hammer's most successful franchise, even though this one has peter cushing and christopher lee in it.

the plot is rather vague and too little happens until about the last 25 minutes, then suddenly the film picks up.

to be fair, there are some good scenes. it somehow feels reassuring to see christopher lee have some...
Published on 7 Aug 2006 by Mr. A. E. Ward Davies


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3.0 out of 5 stars lacking that special ingredient., 7 Aug 2006
By 
Mr. A. E. Ward Davies (Canterbury , England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mummy [VHS] [1959] (VHS Tape)
the mummy films have never been hammer's most successful franchise, even though this one has peter cushing and christopher lee in it.

the plot is rather vague and too little happens until about the last 25 minutes, then suddenly the film picks up.

to be fair, there are some good scenes. it somehow feels reassuring to see christopher lee have some dialogue before he becomes mummified; the music is better than i thought; peter cushing is his usual dependable self.

however, despite the fact that the 1932 version by universal has its shortcomings, that film had boris karloff to help make it a success. karloff gives THE definitive portrayal of the mummy/high priest. he easily made it his own, but christopher lee is perfectly alright.

it seemed an age before the film was made available on video and then d.v.d, but it was worth the wait.

i wouldn't place this in the "hammer classics" category, but it's still good.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mummy dearest, 13 Feb 2006
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mummy [DVD] (DVD)
There are been many mummy's over the years; they change their names. Some with one arm, some with two. Some talk some do not. Some are wet, some are dry. Some use Tanna leaves some do not. They all like cute young girls.

However by far the one the version that all others are gagged by is this one.

The tomb of Im-ho-tep is found. In the tomb is a box that you can not resist opening even when you are warned by a curse. Yep it has the Scroll of Thoth. Long before Viagra this scroll can bring the dead to life. So what ever you do don't mouth the words. Oops too late. Frank Whemple (David Manners) could not read silently and you know who went for a little walk.

10 years later Ardath Bey (Boris Karloff), who could use a little moister lotion, shows the English archeologists where to dig up Im-ho-tep's girl, Princess Anckesen-Amon. Then the fun begins.

Personaly I do not think Helen Grosvenor/Princess Anckesen-Amon (Zita Johann) looks a bit Egyptian. Then again nether does Im-ho-tep.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good, 20 Aug 2013
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excellent. this is a good story, great actors. fine sets and rich colour photography. and unlike modern stuff the sound quality is good - no blaring incidental music which spoils many films nowadays,
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hammer's The Mummy UK Blu ray review, 25 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) (Blu-ray)
After previously presenting Blu ray special editions of both The Curse Of Frankenstien and The Horror Of Dracula, Lionsgate continue their impressive Hammer releases with this beautifully presented extras stacked release of Hammers 1959 take on The Mummy, the studio's third stab at re-inventing the Universal monster movies albeit in blinding technicolour and with as much grue as the libral 1950s censors would allow.
Less violent in tone and execusion, The Mummy was indeed a slight change in style compared to the two previous Hammer outings with the first act feeling more like a mini epic Saturday afternoon mantinee feature complete with exotic(but obviously studio bound)locations and adventure storyline. Once back in Blighty the film transends back to the refind gothic approach associated with Hammer including some very creepey moments and effective conclusion.
Not a verbatum rehash of the Universal movie, Hammer script writer Jimmy Sangster combined elements from five mummy films including the revenge aspect from the The Mummys Hand and the forbidden love aspect from the 1933 original version. The narrative was then moved from the contempory locations of the Universal versions and back to Hammer's 19th century period settings to present a different take on a similar story.
Solidly directed by the ever reliable and incredibly prolific Hammer favourite Terence Fisher who had over the last three years previously helmed two of Hammer's Frankenstein pictures, The Horror Of Dracula and the studio's take on the Sherlock Mystery The Hound Of The Baskervilles. As to be expected from Fisher the directional duties are handled incredibily well and although this isnt the fastest paced movie from Hammer it never drags or outstays its welcome and also includes some interesting camera angles and uses of lighting such as the tomb which is bathed in green and red light making it look for all the world like an Italian horror film from the likes of Bava or Argento years before they used colour in this way. As was always the case with Hammer productions the sets look as well produced and as sumptuous as you would expect from this studio. For the Egyptian set segments it was reported that Hammer brought in an Egyptologist to ensure everything looked as authentic as possible and although it all looks a little clean and clinical and all quite obviously photographed in a set with a suprisingly dust free tomb and crisp white clothing of the funeral precession these scenes look especially good(and far stronger than Hammer's later The Mummy's Shroud) considering the relatively low budgets these films were graced with. Of course back in the famialr territory of England its a return to the more classical approach associated with Hammer with their usual great attention to detail on the Victorian interiors as well as one of the bleakest bogs in English horror history which is used throughout the second act and plays a massive part in the film finale.
True to form the cast are excellent. Again the late great Peter cushing is the main star attraction and is perfect as ever utilising his trademark cultured charm, impeccable professionalism and habit of making use of onset props. A special note must go Christopher Lee back in the role of the title monster for Hammer after a brief stint as a normal man in The Hounds Of The Baskervilles also along side Peter cushing. Lee brings much more to the mummy character than just his sheer physical presence and dogged determination and despite being hidden under heavy make-up manages to convey so much emotion with his eyes alone in one stand out scene you kind of wish he had been given more to do other than a relatively brief flashback sequence.
Of course this would'nt be a Hammer production without a rip roaring score and Franz Reizenstein's rather lavish sounding choral arrangement sets the tone of the film right from the opening credits lending the low budget origins an epic sweep and grand scale.
the Mummy is an impressive Hammer production and one that is as good as anything the studio produced combining all the aspects that make these classics so enjoyable including a well written story, solid direction, quality cast and above all else that wonderful Hammer atmosphere which fans already know is absolutly priceless.

Lionsgate had come under a little criticism over their previous Hammer releases with complaints over The Curse Of Frankenstien's transfer and the aspect ratio of The Horror Of Dracula. I was actually rather pleased with both of these discs but this release of The Mummy should keep over critical fans happy as not only have Lionsgate offered the option of watching the film in its original theatrical widescreen ratio of 1.66:1 or an alternative open gate version framed at 1.37:1 but it also looks phenomenally strong here with a wonderful AVC encoded 1080p transfer. After viewing The Mummy in both ratios I found personally that the widescreen version to be more balanced, focusing the onscreen action better than the fullframe alternative. Both ratios share the same high quality transfer which features a richly detailed and textured image perfectly capturing the feel of a vintage picture. Close ups are excellent whether it be faces, clothing or the bandaged swathed visage of the mummy and Hammer's intricate locations and interior shots are handled very well in HD. The warm 1950s techniclours are also well represented here from the sandy Egyptian exteriors, the mahogany furnished Victorian studies and the red and green gel lighting in the tomb sequences. Black levels and shadow detail are also excellent and the print is in great condotion. It looks to have been cleaned up remarkably well and DNR doesent appear to have been used with the image retaining its naturally filmic presentation with a healthy but unobtrusive amount of film grain present and correct. Some softness does occasionally rear its head but on the whole fans should have no qualms with what is a remarkably handsome transfer which is a huge improvement over the blurry and over matted SD DVDs.

Lionsgate have provided the original monaural soundtrack via an uncompressed two channel LPCM mix. The presentaion is mostly good with the music soundtrack getting a full blooded boost that is immediatly noticable over the credits sequence and beyond. Dialogue is clear enough but can sound a little clipped in the higher registers and foley effects are fine if slightly lacking in weight and presence although gunshots feature a healthy crack with a reasonably hefty low end punch. A decent, uncomplicated lossless soundtrack.

As lavish as the AV restoration is it is also apparent that Lionsgate have put alot of effort into the supplementary features too and as with their previous Hammer releases the extras for The Mummy are just as extensive including a scholarly audio commentary with Hammer experts Marcus Hearn and Jonathan Rigby, two brand new and excellently produced documentaries featuring interviews Sangster and Carreras, an episode of The World Of Hammer narrated as always by Oliver Reed this time detaling the work of Peter Cushing and to round things off is a whole second movie in the form of the 1952 thriller Stolen Face again directed by Terence fisher. Without these extras this Blu ray release would have been an extremely worthwhile addition to any Hammer fans collection but with these included now becomes an essential acquisition and comes with my highest recommendation.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wraps off!, 1 Nov 2013
This review is from: The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) (Blu-ray)
Great release and many thanks for including the superior 4:3 version. (Not a fan of cropping away picture information to justify 16:9 framing). Top drawer Hammer.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fully restored blu-ray gem...., 25 Oct 2013
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R. Shore (Belfast, Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) (Blu-ray)
Having pretty much given on any hope of any decent restoration of the main Hammer catalog titles being done properly, I was prepared to give this one a miss. Thankfully I didn't and it's easily up there with Quatermass and the Pit and Dracula as the best restoration done for a Hammer film. More importantly we get something here which has been sadly lacking on the other non- widescreen titles. An academy version to watch. I've always wondered why when we have been subjected to 1:66:1 and 1:78:1 versions why we haven't had a 4/3 version for people used to TV showings all these years bearing in mind that most of the films were shot full frame anyway. No aspect ratio problems, no audio problems, no colour problems. Why couldn't we have had this all along.....
This blu-ray is simply breathtaking. Nearly makes up for the travesty that was Curse of Frankenstein........
As a footnote I watched both the academy version of The Mummy and the Widescreen version. Preferred the Academy aspect ratio.It won hands down.
Bottom line: Did the people doing this restoration actually listen to people for once something they seemed to have failed to do up until now.

Roger Shore
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You've been around to Molly Grady's again..., 15 April 2009
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This review is from: The Mummy [DVD] (DVD)
Following Hammer's initial success with the The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and Horror of Dracula (1958), Universal, the spiritual home of the classic horror film, afforded Hammer the opportunity to overhaul their entire back-catalogue of monster movies in the same vein. In response, between 1959 and 1962 Hammer made several horror films, that, whilst not exactly remakes of Universal's movies, owed something to them in one way or another. The first of these, The Mummy (1959), is one of the very few Hammer movies that is directly inspired by the Universal canon, and, unlike their strikingly original versions of the Frankenstein and Dracula myths (which bore almost no resemblance at all to the Universal versions), it is almost entirely made up of elements and motifs from the earlier series. Despite an unusually good cast for a Hammer film (Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee are joined by Felix Aylmer, Raymond Huntley, and French actress Yvonne Furneaux), and some typically late-1950s' Hammer boldness in terms of upping the ante with the sex and violence of the story, the film remains a mere pastiche of incidents and plotlines from the Universal series (the Mummy's name, the reason for his rampage, and the notion of him finding a re-incarnation of his ancient love are all taken from the older films). Whilst the film's catalogue of back-breakings and tongue-slicings might have seemed gruesome when it was first released, when viewed today it lacks the freshness of the best of the early Hammer horrors. The tone is uneven, with the middle portion of the film devoted to an unnecessarily lengthy flashback to ancient Egypt (which fails to convince, despite the relatively exotic good looks of Lee and Furneaux), whilst the comic relief is perhaps a little broader than is usual, even for Hammer. Director Terence Fisher has trouble keeping up the pace of the story, and the film really only springs to life during the athletic brawls between Cushing and Lee; even the Mummy's eventual destruction by a load of gun-toting villagers is something of an anti-climactic damp squib (and is yet another Universal device). Furthermore, the performances seem a little stifled; despite several longing looks in Furneaux's direction, Lee can't really do much with the silent, impersonal Mummy (and his awkward, unsteady walk is actually quite comical), whilst Cushing is somewhat bland and boring as an archaeologist marked for death; only in his one scene opposite religious fanatic George Pastell does he seem genuinely interested in what is going on around him.
The most telling thing about Hammer's version of The Mummy is the current certificate of this DVD release; whilst the old `X'-ratings of most Hammer horrors have been down-graded to `15' or even `12' as the decades have gone by, The Mummy is one of the very few that today sport the lowly `PG' tag.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable trip through ancient history., 8 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Mummy [DVD] (DVD)
This is an excellent film. good story, great acting from some of England`s finest actors. Plus a little bit of ancient history thrown in.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love old horror movies., 22 Mar 2013
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The mummy , I was terrified of this movie when I was a kid .This is one of the best mummy movies full of old characters like Peter Cushing and Christopher lee ,these two characters together make fantastic horror movies (cheesy I now) but its true .if like me you like the old horror movies this is a must for your collection .
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Horror, 27 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Mummy [DVD] (DVD)
Good film, but the versienummer with Boris Karlov is stll the best verdien of this type of mummy old movies.
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The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD)
The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) by Jack Asher (Blu-ray - 2013)
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