Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

7
3.1 out of 5 stars
Chelsea Bird
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:£4.99
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2014
Synopsis

Chelsea Bird follows young art student Harriet Bennett as she traverses life through London in the swinging sixties. We are privy to her observations about life, love, sex, drugs and rock and roll.

Review

This is going to sound terribly blunt but I did not like this book. The storyline was weak (to the point of non existence), the protagonist was annoying, a flibbertigibbet and in no way strong enough to carry the narrative without the reader getting distracted on more than one occasion.

The only real saving factor is that you could argue its validity as a social text highlighting the attitudes of both men and women in arguably the most society changing decade of the 20th century. Other than that it was just kind of boring.

However, this is all just one person’s opinion. Give it a read yourself and let me know what you think

Chelsea Bird by Virginia Ironside is available now.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This debut novel was first published in 1964. Subtitled, “confessions of a sixties chick,” it is a tongue in cheek look at sixties London, seen through the eyes of eighteen year old art student Harriet Bennett. Harriet has a boyfriend, Tom Robertson, who works in television and orders meals for both of them without consulting her about her choices and a friend, Ann Hopkins, who is a fellow student and who bores her silly. Harriet is, mostly, bored. She loathes college, but is concerned when she might be thrown out for not attending; she skips from party to bar seeing the same old people and enduring the casual sexism of the men around her. Wisely wishing to sing, “From Me to You,” when visiting her aunt and uncle, we are aware that it is still the early sixties and Tom is more a fan of jazz and classical music than the ‘pops’ he disparages. Her own likes are dismissed by Tom and his friend Nick and the music she wants to listen to, the food she wants to eat, and her own opinions, are relegated because of her age and her gender.

You really get a sense of sixties London in this novel. Times are changing and everyone is going to great lengths to be ‘In.’ It is smart to be young and to have an accent – preferably a cockney or Northern one (their music may be sneered at, but the Beatles influence in clothes, accent, etc, is already being felt). People are pretentious and concerned about clothes and image. Harriet wonders about which brand of cigarettes to buy which will impress her fellow students and friends. She craves romance, but this book also finds her illusions dampened by the reality of feeling used , the discomfort of single beds and the appearance of drugs. Harriet is a young woman feeling her way in a changing world and trying to find her place in it and we aware of both her journey and her basic good sense. Overall, this was an interesting and evocative novel and one which I enjoyed very much. Lastly, I received a copy of this book from the publishers, via NetGalley, for review.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 December 2014
Written when she was just 19, this novella (just 119 pages) has been republished and is very much a quintessential novel of the 1960s. Harriet, aged 18, lives in London as an art student in the early 60s, and is cool, hip etc as you would expect. The language is fully redolent of the era. The characters are rather shallow and not particularly likeable, and I do wonder, as I was just too old to remember the 60s, whether the reality was that, in fact, the decade was filled with similarly trivial and unpleasant people. It certainly did not provide me with a sense of nostalgia or a regret at times now lost irretrievably
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 10 October 2014
I lived in Chelsea during the so-called swinging sixties and hoped I would be able to identify in some small way with this book. I didn't. It was all about people trying to impress others and trying to pull. Written from the perspective of Harriet who is a lackadaisical student at Pimlico school of art it was endlessly depressing with no humour. Nothing ever seems to happen. Wouldn't recommend.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 4 March 2014
A good reminder of what the sixties were really like. Well written with an authentic flavour of the area and the period.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 15 September 2014
Ok...enjoyed it
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 30 August 2011
Fantastic read for all those born in the aftermath of WW2, reminiscent of the youth in the 1960s. Took me right back to the carefree days of being 18 again. Lovely
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Yes! I Can Manage, Thank You!
Yes! I Can Manage, Thank You! by Virginia Ironside
£5.49


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.